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SnakeEyes

SnakeEyes

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SnakeEyes's Latest Activity

  1. SnakeEyes

    BSN Student w/ a Million Q's.

    If you can get ER and/or ICU experience and attain your CEN & CCRN certs you would be very marketable anywhere. The USAF & USN flight nurses I knew transported the sickest, most complicated & unstable patients. IMO: Flight nurses and CRNAs were the brightest and most proficient nurses I have ever worked with.
  2. SnakeEyes

    VA Nurse Salary

    You have to check the locality pay scale because every city is different. For example RNII in San Diego,CA will make more than an RNII in Corpus Christi, TX--cost of living, union, and nursing market considerations. Title 38: Nurses--http://www.va.gov/ohrm/pay/
  3. SnakeEyes

    VA NNEI program and Post-9/11 MGIB use

    Right, our VA just put out that there was money available for NNEI but didn't mention VANEEP. I'll have to find out if that program is being funded anymore.
  4. SnakeEyes

    VA NNEI program and Post-9/11 MGIB use

    Thanks for the reply. I was also thinking about using the GI bill for the 1st year of MSN but try to negotiate to have the paid time off the 1st year that NNEI affords but not take their tuition payments.
  5. SnakeEyes

    VA RN grading and pay. Was there a mistake?

    The boarding process was the most nerve-racking aspect of the hiring process for me. You won't even see the boarding document until several months later when they tell you it's been filed in your record. And even then it only tells you the result and who was on the board. I analyzed the 9 dimensions of nursing and pulled everything from my master resume and also scoured every eval I ever had as a nurse to address the specific areas. I wanted to show my experience and all the subspecialty codes I had attained. As a former military, nurse I also wanted to show my leadership experience and preceptor roles I had been involved with to show that they weren't just getting a worker but a leader who could make the VA better (I know...cheesy but you have to show what you are bringing to the table.) I'm glad to say that what they offered me was pretty fair and that if they had low-balled me I would have appealed and probably have taken my services to another federal agency. It seems that you should have at least been made an RNII.
  6. Are there any VA Nurses (vets) that have looked into using NNEI for their MSN and also using their post- 9/11 GI Bill at the same time? I wouldn't need both for tuition as this would be overkill anyways. I am only interested in drawing the Monthly Housing Allowance (MHA/BAH) portion of my remaining post-9/11 entitlement while using NNEI to pay for my program. I just want to draw the MHA because otherwise it will be going to waste as I don't plan on getting another graduate degree after this. (I only have about 13 months of post-9/11 left)
  7. SnakeEyes

    Current State of Navy Nursing Recruiting

    Ok, you should only speak to an officer recruiter, specifically a medical programs officer. If we replaced all our ER nurses we would have to hire a ton of civilians and they would also have to be able to deploy to everywhere we deploy at anytime, meet our physical fitness standards, etc...and that will never happen. There are many areas of nursing where our staff is complimented with civilian staff but replacing a whole specialty is not likely unless we started closing down our Medical Treatment Facilities.
  8. SnakeEyes

    Current State of Navy Nursing Recruiting

    I would keep in contact with your local Navy Medical Recruiter because they can give you an up-to-date listing of the Nurse Corps needs. Historically, there has been a need for ER, ICU, L&D, and Mental Health nurses. I understand all the service are being particularly selective about any nurses they recruit. Additionally, certain specialties (mostly advanced practice) receive ISP bonuses. Mental Health nurses have received this bonus, too. If you are serious about the Navy, I recommend you get your experience and also get certified. That way you would be eligible for ISP after you get commissioned.
  9. SnakeEyes

    Current State of Navy Nursing Recruiting

    Hang in there. I did 21 years and know from experience that it's "peaks and valleys" as far as recruiting goes. The Navy can be overmanned for a few years and then it will be undermanned. I've seen it with civilian nursing, too. The economy has a lot to do with it but sometimes you'll have droves of retirements one year and things will open up.
  10. SnakeEyes

    Current State of Navy Nursing Recruiting

    I think it depends on what's best for you. I think most RNs should start in med-surg and branch out form there. But when I was in school a good portion of my classmates knew they wanted critical care and did externships in ICU. They were all brought on after graduation. I know of a couple people who did 2 years of med-surg and then APRN. It all worked out for them. It depends on your needs. If you are determined to join the Navy then, yeah, see what they have need of. Once you get in you can apply for different programs or move into different areas the Navy has needs in. Just a word of caution: military medicine is a whole different world than civilian medicine and you may or may not like that.
  11. SnakeEyes

    Current State of Navy Nursing Recruiting

    You will be expected to do different things like overseeing the administration of the enlisted personnel, heading CSR, training, managing equipment and budgets, scheduling, etc. The surgeons will train the surg techs in the specific procedures of the different cases. The nurse would be overall in charge of a service. The only reason you would ever scrub a case is if the enemy somehow takes out all the surg techs. Believe me, the surgeons do not want nurses to scrub in with them. They know the scrub techs know what they are doing (unless you were a First Assist or civilian peri-op nurse with experience). You might see if your medical recruiter can get you in to talk with one of the senior Navy preoperative nurses in your area for a sit-down. BTW: I am a retired Nurse Corps Officer
  12. SnakeEyes

    Current State of Navy Nursing Recruiting

    Keep in mind that Navy OR nurses DO NOT EVER SCRUB--they only circulate. The surgical techs are responsible for scrubbing the cases with the surgeons. Our surgical techs are enlisted medical personnel (Hospital Corpsmen). You may want to check out the Army or Air Force if you are interested in scrubbing cases. It's ridiculous but that's how the Navy does it. And Navy preoperative nurses get the Incentive Special Pay (ISP)...a specialty bonus.
  13. SnakeEyes

    Current State of Navy Nursing Recruiting

    ^This is actually a law the USAF, USA, and USN follow. CNAs, LVNs, and ASN/ADN-prepared RNs unfortunately do not count. Nurses in the military are bachelor's prepared commissioned officers. To even apply for a commissioning as a nurse in the military services you must complete an approved BSN program and pass NCLEX. You must also be a U.S. citizen, pass physical examinations, pass security background investigations, and be highly recommended to serve as a commissioned officer (as you will be appointed by the POTUS). It's not just a matter of wearing a uniform as a nurse. You will almost immediately be placed in a position of leadership and be expected to lead enlisted men and women and (later on) nurses junior to you. You are expected to be a role model, take care of them, and teach them about nursing, professionalism, life, etc.
  14. SnakeEyes

    Current State of Navy Nursing Recruiting

    FYI: The Navy will assign you a subspecialty code for any additional training you have i.e. the type of RN you are. For example, if you are a med-surg nurse, you will have a 1910 subspecialty code. 1960 is critical care. 1945 is ER nursing. 1950 is OR nursing. After the subspecialty code you will be assigned a letter code specifying how much experience or what type of training you have attained e.g. less than 1 year, 3-5 years, board certification, masters, or doctorate education. I believe the "K" code is for board certification, so a board certified med-surg nurse would be a "1910K". There is a listing that your recruiters can show you. Everyone gets classified this way--it's how the Navy organizes its separate nursing communities. It's also how your are assigned to work areas within the Navy and how you are deployed. Each community has their own subspecialty leader who advises and represents that community.
  15. SnakeEyes

    Advice on military and graduate degree

    If you are a drilling reservists and something bad comes up, and your subspecialty code is needed-- they may grab you. Med school students are different because they aren't licensed yet. I had RN friends who were in the middle of graduate programs when they were mobilized to support the Iraqi Invasion and later in Afghanistan.
  16. SnakeEyes

    Current State of Navy Nursing Recruiting

    Historically Navy recruiting has been allocated with annual goals (known individually as billets) for certain programs. The main programs for nurse accessions are: MECP (a commissioning program for prior enlisted personnel who are in the process of completing their BSNs), ROTC, Nurse Candidate Program and Direct Accession. (The Army has all these programs, too, they're just named other things). I highly doubt they have moved exclusively to NCP as the only source. Please speak directly to an officer medical programs recruiter as other recruiters may give you incomplete info. They are not as numerous as regular recruiters and usually handle recruiting Dentists, MDs, P.A.s, and RNs specifically and may be singly responsible for a large geographic area. It is very competitive right now as the Navy is overmanned in most areas. The last manning report I saw (Dec 2014) did not look very favorable. All subspecialties were overmanned even ER and Critical care (which had been undermanned for many years). Your recruiter should be able to pull this report and tell you the areas you should concentrate on if you want to come in. The best way is probably to get your medsurg down and then go Advanced Practice. Good luck. The Navy Nurse Corps always needs Mustangs.