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elizabethgrad09

elizabethgrad09

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elizabethgrad09 has 7 years experience.

elizabethgrad09's Latest Activity

  1. elizabethgrad09

    CURRENT info regarding the use of Suboxone while nursing?

    Buprenorphine is on the standard urine drug screen that we use in our psych hospital. We have patients in our hospital who detox from opiates using a subutex taper, starting at a maximum of 16mg the first day (depends on how much they were taking), with a reduction of 2-4mg each day until they are done.
  2. elizabethgrad09

    Waste of Insulin

    In my psych hospital, insulin vials are kept in a refrigerator and are withdrawn through a pyxis. Whenever a new vial of insulin is opened, the nurse is supposed to place a label on it with the date that it was opened. These labels are in the refrigerator with the insulin and the label states that the bottle should be discarded after 28 days. Most of the time people remember to put the label on the bottle after opening it.
  3. elizabethgrad09

    Teamwork: What is Going to Make or Break Nursing

    I work in a psychiatric/behavioral health hospital, and one of the primary reasons that I keep working there is because there is fairly good teamwork. It depends on who you are working with, though. Some nurses are great teammates, and if a code is called (or even if they just hear a disturbance), they will be there to assist in a flash. However, there are other nurses who seem to be completely focused on getting their own tasks done, and rarely help others. Some of the latter will even make negative comments about nurses who fall behind, stating things like "That person is not a good nurse! They are not very efficient." It appears to me that they think "getting out on time" is the most important thing and the mark of a good nurse. Well, fortunately, being a psych nurse helps you realize that other people's approval is not important. Yes, I try to be efficient and to "get out on time", but I am not going to make that my primary goal/idol. If I need to stay a little longer to meet a patient's need and to be the kind of nurse that I want to be, then I will do it. I believe in the golden rule (Matthew 7:12) "Treat people the same way you want them to treat you", so I try to be a good teammate to everyone, regardless.
  4. elizabethgrad09

    Free CNA training still available?

    Another Phoenix area CNA school to consider is Star Canyon School of Nursing at 8900 N. Central Ave, Suite 104A (just South of Dunlap). Their phone number is 602-943-1337. A member of my church got his training there and recommended it to me. I was there yesterday with a young friend who wants to become a CNA. It is a small no-frills place, cost is $895.
  5. elizabethgrad09

    Any other autistic nurses out there?

    Whichone: my first job after graduation was in a nursing home where the majority of the other nurses were mean also. I had a very difficult time, and ended up being let go. But, three months later, I got a new job as a psych nurse, and I love it. One of the best things is that the people I work with are mostly great - good team players, supportive of new nurses. There ARE non-toxic and even supportive environments out there, so I encourage you to seek out a better environment for your talents - you deserve it! I don't make as much money in my new job as I did at the nursing home, but who cares? I no longer have to dread going to work because my supervisor would pick on me. I now have a supportive supervisor and co-workers, and that has made all the difference.
  6. elizabethgrad09

    Any other autistic nurses out there?

    Thank you to everyone for your replies. I especially thank the person who posted the "Autism Spectrum Criteria" from the DSM-V; that was very interesting and helpful. I'm glad that I'm not the only nurse with some of these characteristics, and I agree that many of these things can be overcome/compensated for as well as finding the right niche that minimizes your weaknesses/maximizes your strengths. My proprioceptor issues make me a little clumsy at times, but I can still give insulin injections, etc. with no problems. When I said that I can not do progressive relaxation, I did not mean that I cannot tense/relax any of my muscles, but there are certain muscles (more internal ones) that I am unable to do that with. Anyway, I agree with those that said that human diversity is vast and should be appreciated.
  7. elizabethgrad09

    Any other autistic nurses out there?

    I bump into things sometimes. I hold things with too much/too little pressure at times which means I drop or break things occasionally (like in microbiology when I broke a specimen slide). Also, when I went to the gym recently and a person was showing me how to use a machine, she said, "you should feel that stretch at [such and such a place]" and sometimes I cannot feel where it is stretching. You know that "progressive relaxation" exercise where you are supposed to tense up and then relax parts of your body? I cannot do that. As I replied elsewhere, these issues were one of the things that steered me toward psych nursing where I do not have to (at least in my facility) insert IVs or foleys.
  8. elizabethgrad09

    Any other autistic nurses out there?

    I agree that the proprioception issue makes it more difficult for me to do some skills. That is one reason that I went into psych nursing. The assessment is a little different in psych also. Of course I still assess for medical issues as well as psych issues. So far I have been successful. I think psych nursing is a good fit for me.
  9. elizabethgrad09

    Any other autistic nurses out there?

    Interesting. I am also a psych nurse now, and I like it a lot. It fits me a lot better than the nursing home that was my first job.
  10. elizabethgrad09

    Any other autistic nurses out there?

    No, I admit that I used that title to make it more attention-getting. I thought the title "Any other nurses who have some characteristics of autism?" would not draw as much interest.
  11. elizabethgrad09

    Any other autistic nurses out there?

    I went to an autism conference recently put on by a friend who has Asperger's, and I related very strongly to some of the things that the presenters were saying about people with autism. I don't have all of the characteristics they talked about, but some of the ones I do have are: difficulty picking up social cues such as body language, difficulty scanning the environment in order to find something, and difficulty knowing where my body is in space (problem with proprioceptors). Does anyone relate to this?
  12. elizabethgrad09

    Best Psych/CD nursing facilities in AZ

    Aurora Behavioral Health is hiring.
  13. elizabethgrad09

    fairly new grad in private-duty nursing, question about orientation

    ]Thanks, everyone, for your replies, they were very helpful and I now understand much better how different agencies handle a private duty situation. It sounds like my one shift of training was about average for the industry, and that the Mom often fills in if more is needed. Elektra6, that is great that you got a seminar plus 30 hours of training, congratulations to you and your agency! By the way, my agency pays $8/hr for orientation, I don't know if that is standard. I can certainly see and agree that the relationship with the Mom (family) is key. I was very honest with her after my one training shift. I told her that I was eager to learn, wanted to do things exactly how she wanted them done, and wanted her to feel very comfortable. She said that she liked my attitude, but was still leery, and I completely respect that. When I talked to the DON at the agency the next day, she suggested an additional day of training on a different case, which I think is for the best. Again, thanks to everyone for your feedback, it is so valuable to a newbie.
  14. As a new grad BSN, I worked for six months in a SNF in 2010 before being terminated (long story that I could elaborate on but is not really the point of this post). I have been looking for a new job for about 2 months, have had several interviews with hospice agencies (which I would really like to get into), but no job offers; I don't have as much experience as they would like. I signed up for a home health agency that a friend recommended and went for my first day of training the other day. The child had a trach, a vent, and a feeding tube. My only previous experience with a vent and trach was one of my clinical days in nursing school over a year ago. After one 8 hour training session I was supposed to work independently on children with vents/trachs, but I did not feel comfortable being on my own after just one day. I asked for another training day and they are going to set me up with one. My question is, what kind of training is reasonable in this situation? I felt after one day that I was getting it, but needed more time. For example, I did not yet know where everything was in the home, as well as the documentation requirements of the agency (I studied the forms ahead of time but I feel like I need more practice), and wanted more practice with the new equipment. Is having just one day of training when you have not done this kind of work before the norm? One problem that contributes to this is that I find that adjusting to new environments takes me longer than other people (i.e. I am kind of a slow starter) and do not know what to do about it. I have overcome this in the past in other (non-nursing) jobs and been an excellent worker, but so far my nursing career has not gotten off to a very good start and I am discouraged. Any feedback and advice would be appreciated. Thanks.
  15. elizabethgrad09

    Drug Testing for NS

    Yes, a drug test was required for my nursing program.
  16. elizabethgrad09

    Critical thinking/scenario practice

    Thanks, Uptonogood RN. I thought of reviewing pathophysiology, but had not thought of your idea of mapping the info to previous patients; I like it!
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