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RNYC

RNYC

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RNYC's Latest Activity

  1. RNYC

    Going straight for my RN

    Another FYI --> RN definitely opens doors, and the pay is higher. Job prospects are a little sunnier these days but, the curriculum is apparently much much more demanding than LPN curriculum. I know several LPNs that began the RN then stopped, not interested in the hassle. Some others I know failed, while others went on to the PhD level through ADN, BSN, Masters etc! Everyone is different of course...but expect a challenge.
  2. RNYC

    Going straight for my RN

    Anatomy and Physio is helpful, but you will need to just be a sponge. You will want some basic skills like how to take vital signs, change dressings, and med calc.
  3. RNYC

    Going straight for my RN

    Go for the RN...loans are easier to pay off when you have a 70k in income. LPN just prolongs the inevitable if you want the RN. BTW the whole bit about LPNs being "so far ahead" when they begin RN program? Not buying it. BSN programs offer hundreds of clinical hours and we arent sitting around.
  4. 50s isnt even old in this country and the average age of an RN is what 47 or 48 last time I checked! Being in your 50s is only slightly above the avg age of an RN. That being said - there must be many nurses in their 60s/70s/80s...I suspect with the way things are they won't stop working until themselves critically ill etc.
  5. When the economy even modestly improves, alot of the more seasoned nurses will simply push the eject button they really dont want to be working....I know more than a few. Things are changing...with the increase in new nurses, there will be less of a shortage even if things do improve. Right now there is NO shortage....not buying the media stories at all. However, all these disillusioned new nurses are the ex factor...if they leave, source new careers, and never come back imagine that? The hospitals will really be in deep trouble. Not to mention when the economy roars, nursing isnt such a great deal financially compared to some other "bubble" economy jobs. All the "the pay is great in nursing" goes out the window etc
  6. i saw something that didnt rub me the right way today...a high school student in scrubs, with a stethoscope around their neck...being trained as an LPN as a high school student (??!!!). They were literally standing around on the floor doing nothing at all, doing "clinical hours". If we include this scenario in the overflow of "nurses" then its smoke and mirrors.
  7. RNYC

    "Nursing School combating CA nursing shortage"

    Most hospitals arent hiring any new grads, regardless of ADN/BSN. If they do hire, they clearly say "BSN preferred"...your story is anecdotal call any HR person at any major teaching hospital in a metro area and they will confirm. I cant say the same for rural areas like Iowa etc....part of the BSN preferred is the need for masters prepared nurses. BSN can start a masters and be commited to working for a hospital as a general or specialized practitioner. RN-MSN also exists, but it is of course a longer path...much longer.
  8. RNYC

    "Nursing School combating CA nursing shortage"

    I didnt say they would all be fine...but any advantage helps. Having a nursing degree from a CC doesnt seem to be desireable to hospitals. Sorry if this reality is hard to accept.
  9. RNYC

    "Nursing School combating CA nursing shortage"

    BSNs for the most part will be ok, I can't say the same for the LVN/ADNs as fresh grads...I know at least 20 of these looking for 1-2 yrs now
  10. ugh depressing
  11. RNYC

    Don't know if nursing is right for me.

    Nursing school, especially in the accelerated BSN format, is very very time consuming. I am not sure if the material is necessarily hard to comprehend for most, but the volume is shocking. Not sure about LPN programs.
  12. RNYC

    Nursing Graduates No Longer In High Demand

    Yes ok then, I understand where your coming from. Many of my friends are APRNs so I just have a different perspective. To me a CRNA or a NP is quite the gig : )
  13. RNYC

    Nursing Graduates No Longer In High Demand

    My two only included converting existing ADNs to BSN programs...never said anything about dissolving programs etc. Truth is the current situation will end when the baby boomers themselves become critically ill...otherwise they will continue to work as nurses and work in general...some are retired but not many I know. The economy has effected us all but we will need as many nursing programs as possible in about 10 years.
  14. RNYC

    Nursing Graduates No Longer In High Demand

    I was not commenting on things retrospectively - everything you said makes sense. I was saying going forward, BSN should be and defacto already is (in some areas) the entry level. Of course experienced ADNs get jobs first, thats very obvious. If you do not find nursing to be a prestigious profession, then I'm sorry - I disagree. To the outside world nurses are very well respected.
  15. RNYC

    Nursing Graduates No Longer In High Demand

    The only thing that throws a bit of a monkeywrench in peoples plans to go into nursing for the wrong reasons in 2 yrs is waiting lists and lottery systems at community colleges. I know of one CC in california with a 2-4 year (!!!!) waitlist to begin a 2 yr program. I believe its simply time to require the BSN because it will maintain the integrity of nursing as a university educated, professional white collar program. Yes we clean up poop and wear scrubs, but people's lives hang in the balance when we underperform...or when our hearts aren't in it.
  16. RNYC

    Nursing Graduates No Longer In High Demand

    Wow...I admire you. Most ADNs become super defensive (as displayed by previous poster)...but as a BSN I have to say I dont see one slight difference in the functionality of ADN vs. BSN nurses. Where I do see slight (SLIGHT!) differences is in communication skills. This is refined through further education, as well as nursing research skills. Evidence based practice is here, and here to stay....simply going about the job because 'thats the way it was taught to me in nursing school'...those days are over. For anyone that chooses to deride or demean my posting...Florence Nightingale was the first researcher for nursing. If you debase me your insulting her too...simply put ADN programs don't include evidence based practice courses which is fine, but as people do the RN-BSN they get that class which puts things into perspective. Nursing is an ever involving art...almost as psychological as it is physical.