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NurseStephRN

NurseStephRN

Telemetry, IMCU, s/p Open Heart surgery
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NurseStephRN has 3 years experience and specializes in Telemetry, IMCU, s/p Open Heart surgery.

NurseStephRN's Latest Activity

  1. NurseStephRN

    Nurses at Disney

    Have you ever looked into cruise ship nursing?? I'm seriously considering it later on!
  2. NurseStephRN

    Comfy insoles

    I'm currently shopping for an AMAZING pair of insoles for my wonderful shoes (Timberland Pro Renova). The only problem with these shoes is the insoles! They have completely fallen apart and bother a lot. As we all know, 12 hours on our feet can be rough if you don't have good footwear. Anyone have a recommendation for insoles? Thanks :)
  3. NurseStephRN

    How do you handle the smells?

    i order a bottle of peppermint spirits from pharmacy to put in the room. i take a piece of 2x2 gauze, unwrap it and dunk it in the bottle, leaving the gauze to act as a fragrance diffuser. works like a charm. we also set out a bag of coffee on the window sill. we usually pour the coffee on a filter and let it sit.
  4. We've also done that on my unit. Pre-op we have started them on Aranesp and PO Iron supplements.
  5. NurseStephRN

    Hospitals in FL

    I have some friends that work there and say there are pros and cons. Pros: Since it is a teaching hospital, there are a lot of interesting medical cases and opportunities for learning. Also, there are always physicians and residents available. Cons: You have to pay for your garage parking (but you get some sort of discount or something), it is in a SCARY neighborhood, and since it is such a large campus nurses usually have to wait a long time for pharmacy to send meds, etc. These are just a few things I have been told from buddies that work there. There are a union hospital, I don't know if that is a pro or con for you. I was a patient there a few times and didn't have positive experiences so in that respect, I wouldn't recommend it.
  6. NurseStephRN

    What HAVE you said to patients???

    This is a hospital, not a hotel. I don't have a special donut-shaped pillow for your dad to sit on.
  7. NurseStephRN

    The CRAZIEST "Baseline" You've Ever Heard

    i've totally seen that! i took care of a patient that was having major hypoglycemic symptoms when the accucheck read in the 300s.
  8. NurseStephRN

    The CRAZIEST "Baseline" You've Ever Heard

    We had a guy in VTACH, rate 170s, sitting up in bed talking to us. vital signs otherwise stable, patient had no complaints... I think 5 nurses running in to check on him all at once kind of freaked him out, but he was OK! His AICD finally fired when his HR reached 185!
  9. NurseStephRN

    Beta Blockers

    Depends. I've had an electrophysiologist write a parameter to hold the beta blocker for HR I also think about the dosage of the beta blocker. Some of my open heart patients have orders for 12.5 mg Lopressor, which most of the time doesn't lower their BP too much (or their heart rate). Now, if it the order was 100 mg Lopressor and their HR was 63, I'd probably hold the medication until their HR perked up a bit.
  10. NurseStephRN

    Unit secretary turned tele tech

    all the telemetry units (except ICU) at my hospital have monitor techs. our secretaries are secretaries only and the monitor tech is responsible only for the ekg monitoring. they take an intensive course on ekg readings, etc. and have check-up competencies every year or so. they are BLS certified also. as the RN we check in every 4 hours and get updates, but if something changes it would be sooner than that. we are a small unit of 20 patients so we are always close to our monitor techs who know much more about ekg than some of the nurses i work with. a little scary... i know. my monitor techs have even gotten in deep discussions with cardiologists and electrophysiologists about a patient's rhythm! lol. if there's a code, of course the nurses/mds are responsible for running it, but the monitor tech is expected to be proficient in all kinds of ekg reading and can recognize lethal rhythms.
  11. NurseStephRN

    To experienced nurses...

    That's exactly the path I'm taking. I've regretted thinking that med school was going to take "sooo long that I'll be old when I finally finish!" I'm taking my sciences, etc and hoping to get into an MD program in the future or take the PA route.
  12. NurseStephRN

    Is your hospital green?

    My hospital is moving in that direction. They gave us all reusable water bottles to eliminate all the disposable cup use, our W-2 forms and pay stubs (if you get direct deposit) are available electronically, and have set up recycling stations. We are also encouraged to decrease printing of lab results, etc as they are available via electronic charting. Our cafeteria has also switched over to green materials. SCD sleeves, pulse ox stickies and other medical materials are not reusable at all, nor are we encouraged to reuse them. We are encouraged to bring into our patient's rooms only the materials we need, instead of leaving stuff in the rooms that will eventually get thrown out when the patient is discharged.
  13. NurseStephRN

    Dr's orders, will I ever learn to read their handwriting?!

    we do this in real life. after being called over and over for order clarifications, the docs/PA/NP will get tired of it and most of them start to make an effort to write legibly. some of them go so far as to hunt you down and go over the orders with you to make sure you understand it all. we like those docs :)
  14. NurseStephRN

    vancomycin in end of life?

    I would have asked that friend/family member where they got their medical training and went about my business taking care of the patient as per the orders.
  15. NurseStephRN

    do you always monitor BP b/f giving HTN medications

    I work in a cardiac unit in a hospital and always take a BP before giving a HTN med. If it is low or falls within the parameters for holding I'll hold the med, but check the patient's BP in a few hours to see if I could give the med.
  16. NurseStephRN

    Anybody wanna take a stab at this quesiton

    higher molar mass = higher boiling point :)