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fridayannelpn1974

fridayannelpn1974

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  1. fridayannelpn1974

    Difficult Interview Questions

    These are very difficult questions, that I was (after 36yrs of being a nurse) never asked. To expect anyone to come up with answers to these vague questions - in an interview- is ridiculous- and unfair. I would ask the interviewer to give me the questions in writing and allow me a few minutes to collect my thoughts and put the answers on paper, as to make sure that I was able to answer them with the most correct representation of my feelings. The first question of this kind (vague) I would ask her to go to her next question and let me think about my answer to the previous. If all the questions are like this , that is when I would ask to have the questions given to me and allow me to review them prior to anwsering them. Any nurse manager, DON etc. should respect your request. No one wants a nurse who blurts out BS answers because they are nervous. It's OK to say you would like time to review the questions. If this is not acceptable to the interviewer, I would consider going someplace else to work. Most people, looking to hire new employees, will be impressed with, not only your unwillingness to answer these vague questions "on the fly", but also your savvy in asking to review the questions. If they view this as a weakness in not being able to answer these questions IMMEDIATLY-- Oh well -- Do you reallly want to work for this kind of person?????? Good Luck
  2. fridayannelpn1974

    work while on narcotics?

    Hi, I worked for many years while taking narcotics -Vicodin and then Morphine to be specific. When you have intense pain, morphine or any other drug does not make you "high' or impared if the dose is equavilent to the amount of pain you are having. I drive and worked until I was disabled by the social securiy disablility adm. Now I don't have to worry about the work issue. If I had to quit when I began having pain, I would not have been able to support myself or get SSD at that time. I would have been homeless. I always disclosed the drugs I was taking and when asked to "pee" for my job I just listed the drug I was taking and provided a MD RX and the positive test result was not given to my employeer. This was in Arizona. No one at work was aware that I was taking pain medication. I worked as a nurse for 36 yrs. and I never did anything at work based on whether I would get sued or not. I just gave my patients the best care I could. I have been deposed by lawyers several times (when I worked as a wound nurse), and never once did I not defend my position,( &that of my facitlity) sucessfully. If you work with good ethics and keep knowledable in the field, most nurses have nothing to fear. I must say that I am grateful to be out of the nursing field as it seems to have become a totally money oriented professsion, and the compassionate part of it seems not to be taught in our nursing schools any more. I have several friends who are older nurses who are finding it hard to stay in the nursing profession with the "new" nurse mentation. They can hire 2-3 nurses at starting wages as opposed to having to pay seasoned nurses with 25-30 yrs experience who '"command" a higher wage. This is so wrong. The years of experience are so valuable. Anyway don't work in extreme pain and end up with an MI or a CVA due to the pain. Your life is more valuable than that.
  3. fridayannelpn1974

    Warning to New Grads

    After 36yrs in this business, many of those years in LTC, if you have found a facility that staffs adequatly- Thank your lucky stars!! My guess is that at least 90% or more are seriously understaffed. Most of the time the thing that interfers with patient care is the enormous amount of documentation that we are required by the state AND the extra documentation that the facility requires. This extra documentation is directly preportional to the amount of B.S. law suits that have been filed by families in denial or with guilt issues. Thank goodness the "Kennedy Terminal Ulcer" (for example) has been identified. Many facilities and their staff in the past were subject to law suits r/t these ulcers -that are TOTALLY unpreventable. Where I work now, even though we are understaffed, at least as I said before, the shift before me cleans up their problems before I get there. The day shift doesn't afford them the same courtousy, so they are constantly cleaning up the day shifts messes. Fortunatly the 3-11 nurses are both strong nurses. One of the day shift nurses is a new grad and a tad bit lazy and the other nurse is just plain lazy or stupid. I haven't figured out which. Probably a combination of both.
  4. fridayannelpn1974

    Warning to New Grads

    If it is any help, I work in a facility where I have resposibility for 52 long term care patients on the 11-7 shift. If you think long term care means there is never any drama - think again. Any given night one or more of them go "BAD", and I have to deal with falls and pts. who can't breathe etc. Fortunatly I have a great 3-11 crew who never leave me hanging out to dry by not taking care of the patients that are unstable on their shift. I only have to deal with problems that come up on my shift. There are too many nurses, in long term care, that ignore the changes in patients and just pass it off to the next nurse. NOT GOOD! I HATE LAZY NURSES! And there are many of them out there. When a nurse fails to act on a change of condition of a patient, the concequences can be deadly. Sure, they get away with it because they can always say," I didn't see any change in the patient". BS!
  5. fridayannelpn1974

    Is It Possible An LPN Can Make More Then An RN?

    WOW- I normally don't make personal comments BUT, you need to get your head out of your a--. LPN's are not technicians!!! We ARE NURSES! Rn's may have taken freshman comp. social studies etc. but the Rn's who graduated when I did with Associate Degrees, ONLY took 2 semesters more than the LPNs and most of the classes were team management and the such. We took the same medication courses, the same IV courses, etc. We didn't split unitl the last 2 terms, which as I said were Not clinical nursing classes. I have also been back to school and done my Freshman comp classes etc. I have a diploma as a private investigator, and I have been the head chef in a fine dining restaraunt, and make all of my own clothes. Life experiences make a lot of difference in how we treat others - including patients. Education is only worth WHAT YOU DO WITH IT! It alone doesn't get you a bigger wage. You should see what happens in the corporate world. There have been many instances where I was (as an Lpn) put into the position of being the on" call nurse" for my LTC facililty. Only the nurses, with a MAJOR attitude- I call it - (RNitis- inflammation of self worth) had a problem with this. Thankfully my DON straighten them out on the realities. In this situation I worked under the authority and direct supervision of the DON. With this direct supervision, I did indeed have the authority to direct Rn's. Just like you, I REALLY AM able to think and make decisions based on fact and my guess is that I am as good or better at it as you are! I bet you will be looking for many jobs in you nursing career - hopeing to show yourself in a higher light. In my town your reputation follows you so getting a new resume won't help! Nurses with your attitude don't last long here. I'm glad you don't have a problem working with LPNs- I just wonder if they are saying the same thing about you? I BET NOT! By the way, with all the other skills I possess, I keep coming back to nursing, because it is the MOST important thing I do. I hope you feel the same way. My starting wage as an LPN in 1974 was $3.37 an hour and I was tickled pink to get it as minimum wage was $1.55. I now make $24.35 an hour as an Lpn. This will go up to $25.10 in March. I think I have earned this wage. When I first became a nurse, we (as nurses) were not given gloves. Only the MD's were given gloves. I was one of the nurses who got Hepatitis B, because there was no vaccination for it. Now all of you get the vaccine. Thank God I am not a carrier or my nursing carreer would have been over long ago. To sum things up - YES it is possible and in many cases, JUSTIFIABLE, that Lpns make more than RN's. GET A GRIP! XOXOXOXOXOXO THANKS FOR LISTENING!
  6. fridayannelpn1974

    Is It Possible An LPN Can Make More Then An RN?

    When I applied for the job I currently have, I was shown a list of nursing wages that included Lpns and Rns. I am an LPN. Because I had worked for the nurse who hired me at another facility, she started me at the top wage for Rns. & said that she wished she could pay me more. I have been a nurse for 35yrs and have had experience in MANY areas of nursing. I can also handle 52 patients (LTC). I mean meds, tx. care plans - all of it. AND I am not afraid to get my hands "dirty". The town I live in is not a small town but is still small enough that your reputation follows you. I am not speaking of ALL RNs but there are a lot of them floating around this town from facility to facility that don't want to come out from behind the desk. My sister has her BSN and is head of labor and delivery in a large hospital. She can't do what I do -and I can't do what she does. She would never apply to a LTC facility and expect to be paid what I am paid. I would never apply to L&D and expect to get paid what she does. When you USE the extra education - IN YOUR JOB - you should get paid ACCORDINGLY. If the extra education is uneccesary for the performance of the job, why SHOULD you get paid more? I have run into nurses for many years who have, what I call, RNitis. I had a charge nurse once who was upset with me for going over her head to the ADON to get permission to 911 a pt. out (of a LTC ) with a massive GI bleed. She told me " I think I know when I have time to call the MD before calling 911." The MD had previously assured me that if I thought someone need to go 911 - don't wait to call. Sometimes it takes 15-30min. before we get a return call from an MD. The very same nurse, less than 2 wks later gave a pt. 40mg of MSo4 IV push instead of 4mg. Thank god the pts. dgt was there and called for help. The MD was in the facility and gave the pt. Narcan and transfered her to the hospital. The Rn even had to get a bigger sryinge to give this dose, since it exceeded the 1cc. syringe normally used. Needless to say no one has seen her since that day! I have seen many kinds of these things over the years. I have run into many really bad Rns, that I wonder how they ever got a license, and some really great Rns that I LOVED working with. I have run into a lot of really bad Lpns, & a lot of Lpns I would put up against any Rn. Just because you have different initials after your name, doesn't make you a better nurse. I am so tired of hearing people say " Oh! are you a nurse or just an LPN. There is a lot of snobbery from Rns towards Lpns. It's usually from the younger Rns who haven't had an LPN bail their a-- out yet. And the reverse is also true. There are a lot of LPNs who are jealous of the prestige given to RNs. When I went to nursing school, we were required to take a course called Vocational Relations. I don't see this in any of the current nursing cirriculums. Maybe ALL nurses should have to go to sensitivity training. WE ARE OUR OWN WORST ENEMIES! How do we stop this? Any suggestions?
  7. fridayannelpn1974

    Having another nurse check insulin doses & other med Qs

    OMG, I hope there are not very many nurses out there that really can't draw up ( for example 8 units of insulin -in an insulin syringe marked off in 100 units per cc.) That's 8 little lines. DUH! It makes me worry about what else they are responsible for if they can't do a simple computation like that. Maybe I'm wrong about what I said before, and the nurses that are graduating today REALLY DO NEED their insulin double checked by another nurse. It scares the h*** out of me. I have been a patient many times over the past few years, and it's stuff like this that puts me into a total panic when I am a patient. Good luck John Q. Public.
  8. fridayannelpn1974

    Having another nurse check insulin doses & other med Qs

    To ChicagoPeds- Your reply was kind of disjointed, so I don't know exactly what you were trying to say. I just want you to know that the patient ratio in vogue today of 1:4 or 1:5 in the hospitals is a peice of cake . When I worked in hospitals, years ago we were assigned 10-14 pts. Beleive me the acuity was just as high. No wonder other nurses think you are goofy, because you are one of the new breed of nurses that can't handle any more than 4 or 5 pts. OMG! No wonder insurance rates have gone thru the roof. As you get more experienced you will realize you can handle more than 5 patients. Best wishes to you - I really don't eat my young! I hope you do well in your career.
  9. fridayannelpn1974

    Having another nurse check insulin doses & other med Qs

    YES, it is MY license and it has been queaky clean for 35years.I graduated as an LPN at the age of 19. I am now 56yo. Since I see you have been a nurse for all of 3 yrs. contact me (in another 32 yrs. if I am still alive), and tell me if you have done as well. I take care of 52 LTC patients and do most of the FSBS and SS insulin coverage. I have kept my license clean by ALWAYS protecting my pt's. best interest. My pts. frequently tell me that they are happy when they know I am on duty, and that they feel safe when I am here. This is THE greatest compliment a nurse can receive. I'm not saying I've never made a mistake - any nurse who says she has never made a mistake, is either, a liar, or too stupid to know she made one. This is supposed to be a vent site for nurses, NOT A PERSONAL ATTACK SITE, on other nurses. Most of us are talking about issues, Not maligning other nurses!!!! By the way, I have never considered myself a "super- nurse", but I am a d*** good one, and proud of it.
  10. fridayannelpn1974

    Having another nurse check insulin doses & other med Qs

    Canoehead was right there about WHY insulin used to be double checked as an absolute! I too remember the complicated mess insulin dosing was. There were times when the MD would order 13 units of U40, and the only insulin available was U60. This meant that the nurse had to figure out how many units of U60 equaled 13 units of U40. When I first started nursing in 1974 the only way we had in our facility to measure "blood sugar" was by the CNA obtaining a urine sample. In a test tube we put the required number of drops of urine, along with the correct number of drops of water, and a tablet. You had to time the test and compare the color of the mixture with colors listed on the bottle of tablets. You were doing well if you came within 50 points of their blood sugar. And to make things worse you couldn't hold the test tube because the mixture got very hot. Hot enough to burn you. With the multiple dosing of insulin it really did need the double check. Wlith U100 as a standard, even patients at home can figure out what to give.Pardon my language, but, it would be a **** poor nurse who couldn't figure out how to give the correct dose with U100.
  11. fridayannelpn1974

    Tasers being used on mentally ill patients.

    The Florence Nightingale era is gone! Wake up Nurses!
  12. fridayannelpn1974

    Tasers being used on mentally ill patients.

    Over the years I have seen all kinds of patients injure nursing personnel or other patients. Before "mainstreaming" became popular, I worked in a facility with 90 mentally retarded patients. Now they are called Developmentally Disabled. If not for the fast action of my co-worker, one of the pts. would have taken my head off with a 1"x6"x 3foot piece of shelving he took from his room. Another pt. was taken off Depo (it's concidered a chemical restraint) and he got sexually aroused by another pt. and bit her earlobe off. Another pt. kicked a tech in the groin with his pointed cowboy boot - really bad outcome on that one. I have seen elderly patients severly injure staff. I isn't just mental patient's who have the capacity for violence. NO NURSE SHOULD HAVE TO RISK INJURY OR DEATH TO CARE FOR THESE KIND OF PATIENTS. Resident's rights have gone way too far. What about health care workers rights? I guarantee if you went off like this at the driver's license bureau the police would be there in minutes. If the taser is indicated - Use it as many times as needed. H-m-m? Why is the phrase "Spare the rod and spoil the child" coming to mind?
  13. fridayannelpn1974

    "I'll Tell The Nurse" (vent)

    I find it amazing that patients wait until 2am in the morning to complain about all kinds of things, like their TV, roommate, diet, patient account, provider, toenails, hairdo, missing clothes, stolen teddy bear, wheelchair, family, medication, appointments, overbed light, telephone, cable connection and everything else I can't do ANY THING ABOUT on the midnight shift. The ONLY thing worse is when the family calls me a 2am. wanting to know about the SAME things. GIVE ME A BREAK. There is nothing I can do about any of these things in the middle of the night. I can''t even relay the message to my superviser because I get off at 7am and they don't come in till 8am. and when I do accidentally run into them they REALLY DON'T want to hear any complaints or concerns from me. I'm the non-exsistant midnight nurse who keeps them from having to come in and work that ungodly shift. Can I say job security? All I can do is pass it on to the day nurse, or write it on the 24 hr. report sheet,and hope she/he gives a damn. Usually NOT! So I get to hear them ***** about it again the next night. You know the phrase -" The Buck Stops Here" - Well it doesn't exsist in nursing. The buck just keeps going around, and ends up being blamed, back on the nurse who has no ability to affect change and hopeing the pt. or the family just gets tired of complaining. For example the recent case in the news, where the patient killed her 100yo. roommate. The family requested a room change and nothing was done about it. I recommed room changes all the time due to conflicts between patients and NOTHING is done about it. The admistration, DON, etc. dont' have to deal with these patients for 8 hours at a time so they don't get how important it is for an elderly patient to have a decent roommate. I can't imagine having to leave my home and live with someone I totally can't stand. NEVER MIND A SOCIAL WOKER WHO IS DOESN'T GIVE A DAMN. -She's too busy - you know - Over worked! Thanks for listening.
  14. fridayannelpn1974

    MRSA Strain Linked to High Death Rates

    To Tampa Tech, I don't know what VRSA is, but it looks like it is problably just a different name for VRE. You are right about a lot on my plate. Even one of my doctors told me "You're in pretty good shape, for the shape you're in". WOW was he right. I can still work, garden, sew, etc. but I have to take medication to do so. This all started with a surgeon who slipped (during a stomach stapeling) in the 80's and ruptured my spleen. They took out my spleen and then I developed peritonitis.Without a spleen I am prone to many infections. I ended up in the hospital for 4 months with a total of 4 surgeries and 5 days on a vent for a paralysed diaphragm due to the infection. They had to creat new pyloric and cardiac sphincters and reroute to the stapeled off part of my stomach. G-tube for 6 months. I have to admit, the experience made me a much more compassionate nurse. My internal medicine doctor during all of this, told me that I was a perfect example of "Murphy's Law". If anything can go wrong - IT DID! Anyway I am still here and enjoying life as best I can. I also do the best I can for all my patients, because I know personally what they have gone thru. Some nurses are so "professional" that they can't see the forest for the trees. But, they certainly impress the administration. gag! Thanks, for careing,
  15. fridayannelpn1974

    MRSA Strain Linked to High Death Rates

    I have had MRSA for years and continue to have a chronic wound in an old surgical site in my abdomen. Unfortunatly I am allergic to Vancomycin. I have trouble with a lot of ABX since the original surgery was on my stomach. I can take them for awhile and then I start throwing up every dose. I am still a functioning nurse and wear a dressing to cover my draining wound. No patient has come down with MRSA R/T my taking care of them. I do not have to do major dressing changes on my shift. I work midnights. I got MRSA years ago in 1980.When I first became a nurse, only the doctors got gloves. I also got hepatitis B - before there was a vaccination for it. A lot of us did. I got it in 1976. Fortunatly, I am not a carrier. The only good side of all of this is that when I get admitted to a hospital for anything, I get a private room. I have had this for so many years that I am not worried about dying from the strain that I have. I just worry about patients that are admitted with the new strains and the nursing homes act like it is just another infection. The nurses have become so complacent to these infections that they treat all of them the same. (in LTC) Don't get me started about C-Diff. That's a whole nother ball of wax. To sum things up, I have tried to get my PCP to do a current culture or send me to an infection specialist, but she want's me to go to a surgeon instead. No surgeon wants to tackle an infected wound. Unfortunatly I am currently hooked up with a University system.I have seen 6, either residents or MD's in the last year. I am looking for a doctor who isn't afraid of my condition! (I promise not to sue you!) Respectfully submitted.
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