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Bobbkat

Bobbkat

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  1. Bobbkat

    Homebirth safer then hospital birth????

    I'm back and forth about homebirth. On one hand, with a well trained, well prepared midwife an appropriate candidate should be fine at home. On the other hand, I was an 'appropriate candidate' but the you-know-what hit the fan so quick with my first childs birth that there wouldn't have been time for a transfer to a hospital, she would have been dead. She spent as week in the NICU as it was. I went from through the door to triage to crash c/s to baby in NICU in under an hour. Besides my own personal birth experience, I'm a NICU nurse and we have had some seriously neurologically devastated babies in the unit because they were homebirth gone very, very wrong. I will say, in each case that I can recall the midwife recommended transfer for hospital care and a probably c/section, but the mothers refused for HOURS before coming into the hospital, and the babies will pay the price forever. It makes me very, very sad. We've had some babies from hospital birthing Moms that have had come in this way too, because of refusal of a c/section. I don't know.....I've seen the research about mortality rates in other countries, and I know that the 'bad' outcomes are few and far between if treated appropriately.....but I just can't imagine life without my oldest daughter......and the babies we've had in the unit...I just don't know if it's all worth it or not. Can you tell I'm conflicted about this?? I personally like the happy medium of a low intervention, midwife attended birth center attached to a hospital.
  2. Bobbkat

    Is There Truth To This?

    As was previously stated, Yale (it's the only hospital I can speak for) greatly prefers BSNs. Does it mean that ADN's never, ever get hired? Of course not. But if all other things are equal, a BSN will be hired over an ADN or a diploma nurse. I won't get into a commentary over whether it is right or wrong. It's just how it is.
  3. Bobbkat

    NEW GRADS:Yale is willing to give you a shot..

    My unit hires new grads, but I'm sure the positions are really, really competetive. It's too bad we don't hire more, because we are so short staffed right now.
  4. Bobbkat

    Mixing Breast Milk with Formula

    I mix them together all the time, and have never heard of it changing the composition of the breast milk itself. I only mix it for nipple feedings if I know the entire volume will be consumed in one way or another, but that's just so I don't waste it, not because of any kind of chemical change. It all mixes together in the tummy anyways...
  5. Bobbkat

    Pregnancy and job offers as a new grad

    It is absolutely discrimination and against the law. Title VII of the civil rights act of 1964 states that pregnancy based employment discrimination is illegal, and that pregnancy must be regarded by employers as any other temporary illness. It is letter (k), if you scroll down the page. http://www.eeoc.gov/laws/statutes/titlevii.cfm
  6. Bobbkat

    Pregnancy and job offers as a new grad

    It is absolutely illegal to not hire someone because of their pregnancy. A number of people have admitted that they would break the law and discriminate against you if they were given the option of being in charge of hiring a pregnant nurse. I believe this is reason enough to NOT disclose the pregnancy until after you are hired.
  7. Bobbkat

    Pregnancy and job offers as a new grad

    There is no reason to mention a pregnancy during an interview, and it is illegal for an employer to ask you about it. If you were qualifed for the position prior to the disclosure of your pregnancy, being pregnant shouldn't change that. If a job is offered, accept, then depending on how far along you are, speak with your manager about the pregnancy. You may run into a tangle with maternity leave off (a company has no obligation to give you FMLA time if you haven't been with them for a year), but many companys will give you 6-8 weeks off for medical leave after birth. There is no garuntee thogh. We have had many nurses take maternity leave with less than a year on my unit. It's never been a problem. Of course, unless you are interviewing on my unit, you might find things very different where you work.
  8. Bobbkat

    Funny things lay-people say...

    Working in the Neonatal ICU: from outside the hospital people that hear what type of unit I work in : Awww, how sweet! You just go to work to rock and hold sweet babies!! (perhaps they misunderstand what 'ICU' means??) From a parent at work once: I should go to nursing school. You all have great jobs, you just get to sit around all the time. (I happened to be spending most of the hour she was there sitting next to a very critical patient doing a lot of charting.)
  9. Bobbkat

    Its not what you know, it's who you know

    May I ask why you say this? I know many people (myself included, as stated above) that have relied on networking to get into a hospital job, and I don't find them to have 'low performance' at all.
  10. Bobbkat

    Being a Teacher/Nurse

    I have a BS in Edu and a BSN, currently licensed and working as a nurse. I let my teacher cert lapse. I am exhausted just thinking about doing both jobs! But, theoretically, since you asked, is it possible? I don't see why not. As long as you have no family commitments and a very open social schedule, it could work.
  11. Bobbkat

    Its not what you know, it's who you know

    It's networking, and it in NO WAY means that the person is unqualified. Example? I graduated with my BSN, great GPA, great clinical recs, passed NCLEX first try with 75 questions, good to go for a job, right? Except there were so few places that would even consider hiring new grads, let alone postings that encouraged new grads to apply, that there were hundreds of applications for each position. I was very qualified, but couldn't get anyone to look at my app. After about 150 rejections (literally), I begged every person I knew in a healthcare facility back home (I had to relocate post graduation) to tell me if they had any connection to a facility in my new area. Long story short, I found someone to put in a good word for me, and finally my resume was looked at, I landed and interview, and am now working as a RN on the unit. Don't get me wrong, the recommendation got them to look at my resume, but I am the reason I got the job. Competition is FIERCE for jobs, or at least it was a year ago. Grades and recommendations aren't enough when you are lost in a sea of jobless new grads all clammoring for the same few positions. It's no different than someone getting a job as a CNA just to get their foot in the door at a facility. You have to use whatever you can in this economy.
  12. Bobbkat

    Bitter dried up nurses that need to RETIRE

    Wait, aren't you the guy that started all the crap a few months ago about how it's immoral for women to seek employment when they know they are pregnant? :icon_roll Know what gets under my skin? People that like to stir up crap just to create drama, and then try to justify it as 'discussion'.
  13. Bobbkat

    First man 'functionally cured' of HIV

    Hee hee. My husband works in R & D for a big pharma company. I'm picturing him as an evil mustache twisting villian. My vision also includes a black body suit and a cape, for some reason. Sorry for the totally off topic additional comment. Back to the AIDs discussion....
  14. Bobbkat

    Current Method of Gavage Syringe Warming

    We warm them in a plastic ziploc bag placed in a warm water bath in one of those pink patient water pitchers.
  15. Bobbkat

    New grad nurses- what did you do to get hired?

    I applied and applied and applied, and called HR and tried every angle I could think of, getting nowhere. Then I contacted every person I knew working in a hospital back home (I had to relocate to a state after school, so I had no experience with the hospitals here) and asked them over and over again whether they knew ANYONE who had any contacts in a hospital in my new state. A nurse I knew was working with a new attending that had just come from a hospital in my area. The doctor agreed to call the nurse manager on the unit I was interested in and put in a good word for me. Next thing I knew, my application went through HR, I was offered and interview, and then offered a position. Long story short, networking was key for me. There is no shame in using whatever contacts you can for an edge. I had great GPA, great references, all that, but it was getting me no where since every one I was competing with also seemed to have great grades and references.
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