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adammRN

adammRN

DNP/PMHNP student
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adammRN has 11 years experience and specializes in DNP/PMHNP student.

adammRN's Latest Activity

  1. adammRN

    The economics of PA vs. NP

    No need to be sorry Katie! You should write a letter to the AACN and tell them that their idea for the DNP is stupid and worthless because you don't need the DNP to do what you do as an MSN. Also, tell them the extra clinical time is worthless and just because every other clinical practice based discipline is doctoral level doesn't mean we should make our professional require more of nurses! Either way, your mentality will hold our profession back. Regressive, not progressive. That is the way we make the world better! Here; https://www.aacnnursing.org/Portals/42/Publications/DNPEssentials.pdf That way you don't have to strain yourself looking for what you don't know!
  2. adammRN

    The economics of PA vs. NP

    No need to be sorry. So just so I get you, your argument is; no one needs to go to school since they can figure out how to do it on their own?
  3. adammRN

    last year of FNP school but want PMHNP

    I don't know if you know, but you can't just up and transfer grad schools. A student in my cohort (from another city) didn't realize this. She got stuck and found out the hard way she can't just transfer her credits. Schools will only take a few courses at most if that. Since your program doesn't offer psych - 100% you need to complete it, and find a post grad cert later. I wouldn't worry too much of the cost, there are tons of cheap programs.
  4. adammRN

    The economics of PA vs. NP

    PhD***... DNP are supposed to be integrating research to practice and facilitate change/nursing leadership, not conducting research experiments. My cohort picked DNP because we wanna be terminally educated providers. None of us wanted to be "in research." DNP is meant to be clinically focused and needs a more beefy clinical/scientific curriculum.
  5. adammRN

    UMSL DNP

    Yeah, let me know if you have any questions. Sorry I can't precept you haha. I still have friends and family in the StL area. I wish I had done HPSP for medical school. Too late now!! I'm very happy though. Being a provider either way made my life so much better.
  6. adammRN

    UMSL DNP

    I joined the military out of college and ended up in big city in Texas. For privacy reasons, I don't wanna say where. It's a private brick and mortar, hybrid program (meaning we have class days on campus, but most of the time we are in clinic or are expected to get lectures online and do readings). Hybrids are perfect, as you shouldn't be in lecture for hours and more focused on clinic anyway. This also allows for you to coordinate with your preceptors schedule. I would say the biggest issues for any program are clinical placements and capstone project logistics. Class work is easy compared to what we did as undergrads. I would expect UMSL to have the clinic rotations arranged for you already as they are a big state school and most of the time these types do. Yr 1 was mostly theory, and the 3 Ps. Yr 2 you start your capstone and clinic. Year 3 you take your final diagnoses classes, finish your project and prep for boards and graduation. If you can, find a small private practice for your capstone. Avoid government orgs at all costs. What is the program structure there? I graduate this December! It was 3 years Spring, Summer, fall. The summers make up what would be the 4th traditional year of a doctorate. We did a lot of writing and heavy group projects year 1 and 2.
  7. adammRN

    UMSL DNP

    Hey WOW!! I never thought I'd see the day someone here goes to my alma mater. I did my BSN there 05-09. It was a great program all of us passed NCLEX, though like any we had our torturous professors that used scare tactics... I know the faculty are probably all gone... but it was a good school.
  8. adammRN

    What can a nurse do with an MBA?

    Ditto that... PA always have to have a MD. NP can be completely independent. I know they get more clinic time but... Alotta nurses here under the impression the DNP as a worthless piece of paper, funny cuz there are a lot more offensive degrees. And I remember looking into the MBA and realized it was such.
  9. The real issue is public health literacy... Nothing to do with md/nurse but if you need an example, just look at the current pandemic.
  10. I have to echo this. It was a nightmare for a lot of students at my school as well. I'm at a hybrid DNP program (please at least do hybrid) and even though school of medicine, pharmacy etc... had clinical spots... we still had to find our clinic placements. This adds to the stress and though everyone got in eventually, some started very late and barely were able to finish what they needed to stay on track with the program.
  11. adammRN

    PNP vs Pediatrician

    You might be of the opinion it doesn't matter. However, I have 2 additional years than you or the typical MSN, working on clinical problems, studying psychiatry and looking at treatment guidelines ... not to mention a brick and mortar school where hands on skills and demonstrations were required. "Because the jobs don't require it" is as weak an argument as anecdotes about pay or side practices, because more important are your clinical knowledge, experience and patient satisfaction/outcomes. You can rationalize your decisions however you like! Also, if you need ideas for "fun," I can tell you 1 million other things other than going back to school. I almost went to art school, and even that wasn't fun because the teachers always told me what I had to paint.
  12. adammRN

    PNP vs Pediatrician

    Your posts on this subject are paradoxical. About the only thing you actually got correct the problem is the curriculum and clinical time, not the DNP degree itself. The extra year is still a step in the right direction. Clinical hours accumulate as you practice. I'm just happy we agree, practice is what matters. So in the next 4 years, I should forever be ashamed I didn't do MD? Probably not as I can have my own practice. I know you haven't looked at any research so the DNP would serve you well. There are many studies that show not all providers are created equal. So regardless of your educational path, you can still be a great provider - which was my point to the OP and you clearly missed. Just as easy as the whole DNP v curriculum argument. I'll get the clinical time later and work with some good psychiatrists. The Koolaid most of the people I know are drinking was an obvious solution - we all wanted to be providers, and not have to return to school with the threat of the MSN going away. I was not gonna be poor for another 5-6 years and go back to undergrad for an MD. Big schools with MSN programs were being phased out when I was entering school. So... not as if I was gonna MOVE or go to an online school just to do an MSN then have to go back later for a DNP.
  13. adammRN

    PNP vs Pediatrician

    I would sleep 10x better if you stopped posting negative things about the nursing profession having a doctoral program path, finished your personal education, or went to medical school you keep advocating for.
  14. adammRN

    PNP vs Pediatrician

    Yup. Kool-aid where in my city, there are no more MSN programs, wanted the terminal degree so I don't need to go back to school, have more clinical time, and am becoming a independently licensed provider. Pretty sweet Koolaid if you ask me. MSN was never an option and where I am, MSNs are getting their DNPs. It was either go back to undergrad for MD or do three years and make as much as I want. If you start a side business, do consierge medicine or counseling in your free time as an NP you can make 200k+... Like, where is the loss here? Only with limited mindsets as you and others here have demonstrated. BTW I never made the argument you did. I merely stated that all the psychiatrist I have seen in practice, we do the same thing. Also have personal anecdotes that PATIENTS prefer NPs to MDs, which most others here seem to forget as well we are here for them. I have in my short clinical time seen several patients not want to see a psychiatrist anymore. If you need medical school and 10,000+ hours to figure out how to read guidelines that groups of doctors and scientists put together, I think you probably shouldn't be a provider.
  15. adammRN

    New PMHNP

    Be personable, willing to learn and make your psychiatrist happy. If he wants you to do something, do it. Don't go in and change everyone's meds around... you should notice patterns in the way they prescribe over time. Basic right? When I was inpatient - we pretty much diagnosed schizophrenia, bipolar or MDD to bill the highest codes. So if it's like that I would study those and know the DSM criteria back and forth. The psychMD had a template for us to use when doing intakes. Follow ups are pretty easy, but you need to look up the patient before and see what was done. Do you know how to do a 45-1 hour intake full psych exam (MSE, ROS, MDQ/BDSS questions, Social/Psych/Medical history etc)? If your MD doesn't have a template ready, I would make one. Are you familiar with the EHR? That was the biggest pain IMO and don't know how to learn it without being there.
  16. adammRN

    PNP vs Pediatrician

    What koolaid do you and all the other nurses here think that I am drinking? The one where I'm a provider, can make 15k a month or more, all I do is talk to people and am independent so I don't have to deal with small minded nurses like yourself? The koolaid to not give up another 8 years of my life? The koolaid to finish my education so I don't have to go back? I started 3 years ago, so I never did an MSN. SO why would I not do a DNP? I am sorry but to do the job I am gonna do well, I don't need 4 years of medical school and 4 years of residency. How about you contribute something, other than one sentence that has to do with the OP? There are many articles demonstrating how not all providers are equal regardless of the degree. Why don't you use some of your free time to do some reading on actual comparisons of providers instead of coming here to flame others?
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