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HollyGoLightlyRN

HollyGoLightlyRN

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HollyGoLightlyRN's Latest Activity

  1. HollyGoLightlyRN

    To My Preceptor

    As a brand new nurse myself, fresh off orientation I also was lucky enough to have a preceptor like the one written about here. Unfortunately, I also had a one that was not quite as kind and left me feeling like I had chosen the wrong career. Thank GOD for the good ones. This letter almost made me cry...and then I popped a piece of gum ;-)
  2. HollyGoLightlyRN

    New Grad Nurse in Hem/Onc, Stem Cell Transplant

    Do any of the Chicago Hospitals hire ADN nurses who are pursuing their BSN?
  3. HollyGoLightlyRN

    Aren't You just Incredibly Proud?

    I realize that good nursing positions are harder than ever to find, but what makes nurses think this only pertains to nursing? MANY college graduates are having difficulty finding jobs...why do you think so many pursue a master's degree right away! I know MANY people with Bachelors and Masters degrees who are working at minimum wage jobs because they can't get jobs in their field and they have giant student loans to repay on top of it. The truth of the matter is that a Bachelors degree is a dime-a-dozen these days and everybody has one so you're not "special" to have even graduated from college anymore. Thank God we have been actually given special skills as nurses. Not just anyone can do our jobs and I don't even think the workplace problems people complain about on these threads is specific to health care. My husband is an engineer and I hear the same kind of crap going on in his workplace. Granted he doesn't work in a life or death environment, so it's not exactly the same, but trust me the older engineers are not welcoming new grads who think they know it all into the fold with warm, fuzzy open arms. Everyone is worried about losing their jobs these days! I appreciate the "reality" check, and as someone pointed out that presenting reality is therapeutic, but I also know that "reality" is subjective to some degree and misery loves company. I'm also mature enough to know that there are very few things in life that are what you thought they would be! Marriage comes to mind...haha In fact, I once had a job for 18 years that I literally was on the clock 24/7, worked every single weekend and holiday, was bitten, pooped on and never heard a thank-you. And on top of it all the pay sucked! I'm sure most of you can guess that it's called being a mother. Trust me, that gig wasn't what I imagined at all! ;-/ Not to be disrespectful, but honestly, if being a nurse is so damn miserable then why not get out of the way so those of us who want the jobs can have them?
  4. HollyGoLightlyRN

    Aren't You just Incredibly Proud?

    As a new nurse I sometimes wonder when nurses will take back their profession and realize the potential strength in number we could enjoy. I am not normally one to feel that a unionized workforce is the best, however I think when it comes to advocating for our patients we should be fighting harder for safer staffing ratios and better work environments for ourselves. It saddens me to hear nurses say they regret their choice of profession...I would want better than that for my loved ones. If I get to the point where I feel that way I owe it to my patients to become a mechanic :-)
  5. HollyGoLightlyRN

    guidelines for BP

    I just want to thank all of you for sharing on these threads. As a new nurse I've learned so much just by reading these! I realize everything needs to be adjusted to policy protocol, physician preference and orders as well as the patients symptoms, but these real world scenarios really make me think and things just make more sense.
  6. HollyGoLightlyRN

    First or last name on stethoscope?

    I put my first initial, full last name with RN after. Keep a hawk-eye on that stethoscope! That's a beautiful and expensive scope. I had an inexpensive scope for school and bought a NICE one as a graduation present to myself :-)
  7. Yes, some schools offer RN (ADN) to MN, but not all Masters degrees are for advanced practice such as NP. I know at UW Milwaukee you have to to the DNP which can also be done direct entry from RN (ADN). I also have heard of other programs that have a direct entry to MN, or PhD if you have a Bachelor's Degree in another field. Does any of that make sense??
  8. Hi there. I am a brand new grad who has just passed the NCLEX and I'd love to get into aesthetic nursing. I've been a licensed esthetician for 10 years and have owned my own studio for 8 of those years. Any advice for those of you working in aesthetic nursing on how to market myself to a plastics or cosmetic dermatologist? What are they looking for in a nurse as far as skills are concerned? Is there any further education I can attend that would increase my marketability in the field? Thanks!
  9. HollyGoLightlyRN

    Anybody take it today 6/25

    I took it today as well. Shut off at 75. Took a little less than an hour and got the good pop-up! Hope I passed because that was not a fun test!
  10. HollyGoLightlyRN

    What specialties tend to hire the most new grads?

    Wow! I wish every hospital had this type of Residency Program! Looks fantastic! I just graduated from school and wondered the entire time how come doctors have an opportunity to learn on the job through internship and residency, but nurses are essentially thrown into the job with just a few weeks of preceptor-ship. Would LOVE to work for a hospital that has a program like this.
  11. HollyGoLightlyRN

    Advice for stethoscopes...

    When I started nursing school I bought a Littman Lightweight because it was fairly inexpensive ($45). It was adequate. Midway through my program I bought the Littman Master Classic II and I love it. Even had it engraved. Littmann Master Classic II Stethoscope | allheart.com
  12. HollyGoLightlyRN

    hypokalemia and ng suctioning

    You are correct that the hypokalemia occurs from depletion of the fluid and electrolytes from the stomach. Potassium is given IV, but never IV push or undiluted. Serum potassium is always checked per agency protocol after administration.
  13. HollyGoLightlyRN

    NCLEX SATA

    I am in an RN program with 2 semesters to go, however after the first year we are eligible to sit for the NCLEX PN. I took the exam on Monday and had 37!! SATA questions. It shut off at 85 which is the minimum number for the PN exam and just found out today that I passed! I did do the PVT and got the good pop up as well. That was a crazy number of SATA questions and I honestly wanted to cry while I was taking the test. Thought for sure I had failed.
  14. HollyGoLightlyRN

    Please, please, please remember the 5 rights!

    I could not agree more. I'm still a student, but in my clinical setting last semester I was given a flu vaccine to administer to my patient. When I went to check it against my MAR I realized the syringe was not labeled. I went back to the RN who pulled it for me and told her I did not feel comfortable administering an unmarked medication. She was extra annoyed that she had to go back to the med room and pull another, but then she realized that NONE of them were labeled. They came up from pharmacy that way apparently. My instructor was very happy with my handling of the situation and not backing down from the RN who really did try to intimidate me into just giving the med...shame on her right?
  15. HollyGoLightlyRN

    Please, please, please remember the 5 rights!

    Thank you SOOO much for posting this. As a RN student who will graduate soon these real world experiences are the VERY BEST teachers. I will remember this story every time I administer a medication. I'm so glad the child didn't suffer any long-term effects...I'm sure the nurse who made the error will, I know I would. THANK YOU
  16. HollyGoLightlyRN

    Inaccurate respiratory rates

    Honestly I think it's more a matter of WAY too many patients per CNA. In utopia it should take someone only 3-4 minutes to take a set of vitals. But in the real world you know if you go in that patient's room they will need to go to the bathroom, need to be changed, repositioned, etc. If you've got 10 patients and have timed vitals that need to be done within a 30-60 minute window you do the math. That is 3-6 minutes per patient and that is simply impossible! Then throw orthostatic BP's or weights in there and you've created a nightmare for the CNA. Honestly I think vital signs should be the responsibility of the RN. Meds and patient status are based on those numbers. If the RNs are doing them during their assessment anyhow, WHY are two people doing the same assessment?