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mrsrlg

mrsrlg

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mrsrlg has 5 years experience.

Hi! I have been married for 15 years and have no children, though I have 2 cats that think they are children. :)

mrsrlg's Latest Activity

  1. mrsrlg

    Brian Short News

    May they RIP. So sad for all affected. Prayers!
  2. mrsrlg

    baker college auburn hills lpn program

    Hi, Not sure what info you're specifically wanting, but yes, if you complete your pre-reqs by the application date, you can apply for the program. As for negativity, well everyone has an opinion, but I can only provide mine. :) I spent 3+ years as a full-time student at Baker, 1.5 yrs online and the last 2 years at AH. I graduated the PN program in August and am now a working LPN. I'll also be returning to AH in Sept. to begin my LPN-to-RN. My experience has been positive. Has it been perfect? Not perfect, but certainly enough so to make me want to return. I had excellent instructors, in-depth instruction, and plenty of assistance with anything I needed, e.g., financial aid options, etc. The shorter terms, 10 weeks, allow for some breaks along the way, something I felt I needed from time to time. When you have a life outside school, as most of us do, those breaks allow you to reconnect, regroup, and be ready for the next 10 weeks. In our program, we had clinicals twice a week, mornings or afternoons, and class 1-2 days per week, depending on the quarter. There were also opportunities to do some community work, such as participating at health fair events, raising money for certain causes, etc., which I enjoyed being part of. Anyhow, good luck to you. If you go to AH, or anywhere really, I hope it is what you want it to be. :)
  3. mrsrlg

    Baker College

    Great! Once you know all your options, it will make the decision that works for you easier to make, with your current schedule, cost, classes needed, etc. I chose the program and school I did out of convenience, but it really has worked out for the best for me and no regrets at all. For all of us, it is fortunate that at least we have a few options out there. :)
  4. mrsrlg

    Baker College

    Sorry, wasn't thinking...as a current LPN, it is definitely in your favor to look at the bridge programs available. Baker has one, but there are others - I think OCC and maybe HFCC. Doing it this way, you may be saving yourself a year of school. You may just need to take a few credits of pre-reqs (or 1 quarter or semester) and enter the bridge program, whereas with the ADN you're starting all over and it may be 2+ years or more, so it might save you a year of school. I would definitely talk to some advisors at those schools you're interested in. Again, good luck!
  5. mrsrlg

    Baker College

    Nursestyle1, The LPN-RN is 3 quarters long, basically about 9 months, but there are pre-reqs needed before applying. It is likely more credits than a usual ADN program because it works with the existing AH LPN program. Including pre-reqs, the LPN program is 1.5 years (actually almost an associate's credit-wise) in itself, so when one graduates with their ADN they basically have about 2.5 years of schooling (inc. pre-reqs), whereas the straight ADN, I believe, is 2 years. However, it is not restricted to just those in the LPN program, but all must take the pre-reqs. I'm not sure if that helps, but I hope so :). Baker College uses the quarter system, where classes are compressed into 10 weeks. It has the same course content as the longer semester, but is compressed time-wise. The lecture classes are usually 4 credit hours/5 for some science classes. When going through an intensive program, like any nursing, it puts more pressure on because there is more to learn in a shorter time, but we get breaks between classes, e.g., we had 4 weeks off at Christmas, 2 weeks off between Winter and Spring quarters, etc. That break is very much appreciated, and I cannot imagine myself ever going back to a traditional semester program now, but that's just me. :) Anyhow, class calls, but good luck in making your decision.
  6. mrsrlg

    Baker College

    It's a common subject that comes up about Baker, so this thread just supplies more info about the school. People have to decide for themselves how much that will influence their decision. It wasn't key for me, but it may be for someone else. You asked about it, and there is nothing wrong with that. The OP may appreciate knowing a little more. :)
  7. mrsrlg

    Baker College

    As I've stated in this thread, I'm a long-time Baker student and intend to finish all of my nursing there, including LPN-to-RN and RN-to-BSN online at AH, and I really have no qualms about doing so whatsoever. However, I decided today to have a look through various hospital career sites to see what they require. What I found was that of 11 hospitals I looked at, only 4 had a requirement that you graduated from an accredited nursing school. Of course, it does not say what type of accreditation is required, just that it must be accredited. Doctors, U of M, Providence, Crittenton, Oakwood, POH, and St. Joe's only stated that you have to have a current MI RN license or a similar statement (St. Joe's said accredited or equivalent). In five weeks, I'm graduating from the PN program and hope to start the LPN-to-RN in the spring, but I have done my clinicals at a couple of the hospitals above and spoke with them and they have no requirement about being accredited and definitely hire from Baker. When I was ready to apply originally, I had a 4.0, so I could have just applied for one of the ADN programs, but I chose this path, Baker, and AH for convenience, as well as the ability to work as an LPN while finishing up the three quarters required for the LPN-to-RN. I don't argue the good or bad of Baker. All I can do is state my experience there, and I've enjoyed being a Baker student. Like any school, it is not perfect, but I like smaller class sizes, individual attention if desired or needed, quarters versus semesters, etc., but people need to figure out for themselves what is right and just take what I and others say with a grain of salt and as just another opinion.
  8. mrsrlg

    Baker College

    I have looked around before, but decided to do so again. While I do see that only Baker Owosso is listed as pursuing NLNAC accreditation right now, all of Baker College is accredited through HLC and I'm sure they will all get otherwise accredited at some point, but getting accredited is costly, time-consuming, and requires manpower, something many of these smaller campuses do not have, so perhaps that is why they haven't yet all pursued it. When I looked at the CCNE website, it does appear they are more likely to have schools offering BSNs and higher. Anyhow, these forums are great places for people to gather information about where they might like to go, but while I don't push Baker on anyone, it is a choice, and I have been a full-time student there for the past three years, so all I can give is my thoughts about the school. At the same time, I have never discouraged anyone from going to another school - why would I? :) Anyhow, you should never apologize for posting; you're just having a discussion about the schools, who is accredited, etc. People make up their own minds and should not be 100% influenced by anything they read on a forum anywhere.
  9. mrsrlg

    Baker College

    About Baker losing their accreditation...well, every campus is different, so I don't know anything about the Clinton Township campus and what issues they may have. Other campuses seem to be in the process of moving through the process. Otherwise, all I can speak about is what I have been told by the hospital personnel and HR people I have spoken with. I never argue the whole accreditation process on here as there is no point; I don't go to an NLN accredited school, but it does seem odd to me that some big name schools, such as OU and U of D, are not accredited through this voluntary process, so that just makes me wonder. Anyhow, no argument here. People have to choose what is right for them. Again, all I can say is that the people I have spoken with are much more concerned that you have passed your NCLEX and have attended a MBON-approved school, than with NLN accreditation.
  10. mrsrlg

    Baker College

    No, you're not mistaken. NLNAC accreditation is a voluntary process, and there are many schools not on the list, including OU, U of D, etc. There is another link within the NLNAC website that shows you a list of what schools have applied to begin the process or have started the process (though there are still many not on that list, either). For me, whenever I have asked my clinical sites (hospitals and other) about whether they consider this when hiring, they have said they only need to know 2 things: 1) That you've graduated from a school approved by the MBON, and 2) that you've passed your NCLEX. That's it. However, some feel strongly about only going to an accredited school, so this is a personal choice.
  11. mrsrlg

    Baker College

    Hi nursestyle1, I can't help you with CT, but I'm about 5 weeks from my nurse pinning for the PN program at AH. I just wanted to let you know that, if you don't get into CT or decide taking the 3-quarter bridge might be better, the first class of RNs are graduating in 5 weeks and a new class is starting in the fall. However, they are waiting for approval from MBON for a second LPN-RN bridge, which they hope to begin in spring (possibly fall, depending on when approval is received). Their hopes are to have (2) LPN and (2) LPN-RN programs per year. They have just started their 2nd LPN, so that part is done and they now just need approval for the second LPN-RN. I believe the rotation will be: LPN starts - summer and winter/LPN-RN starts - spring and fall. Good luck! :)
  12. It's been a great program. Like any other nursing program, there is a ton to learn and it has been tough to keep up at times. Plus, you really will have little time for anything else, but we were all forewarned at orientation. :) Really, it has been everything I expected it to be. While it will be a constant learning experience every working day, I can't wait for the end of August to come so I can begin working, followed by ADN program start next spring. I have been a full-time student at Baker for the past 3 years (nursing, as well as working on another degree), so my experience has definitely been more positive than some of the posters here, but I hope you get in first time. If you don't this time, don't give up. Auburn Hills now has two LPN programs per year, summer and winter, and LPN-to-RN transition (ADN) will soon have two programs (just waiting for final approval for the second one, which will hopefully come in by Christmas for a spring start), fall and spring. :)
  13. Hi gypsy76, I'm actually getting ready to graduate from the program in August, but since the program starts on 6/30, applicants should be hearing pretty soon. I'm actually surprised it hasn't happened yet. Did you put down your email address in your contact info? When I was accepted last July (for Sept start), I received an email at 11:30 pm from the DON about 9 days after submitting my app. Anyhow, I happen to know the DON has been away (but not sure when she was returning), so I would think word will go out pretty quickly, maybe tomorrow or Monday? Pre-admission testing is only one part of the points, so don't give up yet. :) Good luck!
  14. LauJen, I now realize that you're not the one who was talking about difficulty getting accepted, etc. I will, however, leave the info for interested others. :)
  15. Hi Anne36, The requirements to stay in the program are that you achieve, at minimum, 84% (B-) for each class. Getting 1 wrong would not cause a fail. However, each quarter they give us a drug calculation quiz that you must get 100% on before you're able to pass meds that quarter. If you get any wrong on that, you can remediate and take the quiz again. Then, if you fail again, you cannot pass meds at clinicals until you're able to show your instructor that you can do all the calculations 100% of the time. So, that has to be an exaggeration, unless there is some test I don't know about that requires 100%, which I doubt. I have to think that Baker is comparable to other schools with requirements, though? I have heard that some require you to maintain a C+, rather than B-, but that is the only difference I've heard. However, nursing school is a lot of work, and there is a ton to learn, so difficult in that way. :)
  16. Hi LauJen, Like many nursing programs, ours is tough. There is a lot to learn, especially in the first quarter, which can make it stressful. Of course, they need to get you prepared for your first clinicals. I felt well-prepared for going to clinicals, though, so all that hard work was worth it. We're now into our second quarter and will be starting our Med/Surg clinicals the week after next. In our rotation, winter and spring quarters are a little lighter, whereas summer will be overloaded. It is just how it played out with clinical rotation availability and such. I can tell you that we have excellent instructors, in my opinion, and most are willing to do what they need to help you. There is a ton of homework, reading, practicing skills, testing, etc., but that is not unlike many schools, I'm sure. I think I remember reading a post of yours (was it you?) about gaining entry to the program. I don't know about other Baker campuses or programs, but ours (at Auburn Hills) really did require a 4.0 or almost 4.0. Some had an odd 'B' in their grades or a retake or drop, but that then required them to get a very good Hesi score. I know it is discouraging if you don't have it, but as I told people who were applying with me - if you don't have a 4.0, study like hell for the Hesi, which is worth a maximum of 11 pts, almost half of the available point count. As of fall quarter, there were 400 people registered as wanting to apply for the PN program at Auburn Hills in June, so the competition does get tougher, but I think they're working on starting a second LPN program (not sure when, though), so that would ease it a bit. Our campus also offers the LPN-RN ladder now, though an LPN must have a year's experience to apply. However, graduates of the LPN program there will be given preference (if equally matched with another from another school) in getting into the LPN-RN program. Basically, one must still compete, but would have the edge over an equally qualified candidate from another school. Anyhow, if you have specific questions, feel free to ask. I don't get the chance to come on too often, but I'll reply when I'm notified that there is a post. Good luck to you! :)