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southernbeegirl

southernbeegirl BSN, RN

Rehab, Infection, LTC
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southernbeegirl has 16 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Rehab, Infection, LTC.

southernbeegirl's Latest Activity

  1. southernbeegirl

    Sometimes it's hard to tell a drug seeker from a patient in pain.

    Honestly, I don't care to give them their pills either. It's the manipulation you have to deal with leading up to their med time that drives me nuts! They always have that behavior, never fail. They lie, say you didn't give it, try to manipulate you to give it to them early, and on and on and on. It's nonstop!
  2. southernbeegirl

    Sometimes it's hard to tell a drug seeker from a patient in pain.

    I told yall about my husband because I did see some talking about how patients were sleeping. that was all. How he was treated is for another thread someday. But it was one of the reasons i became a nurse. I shouldn't have said anything on this thread, sorry. and I hate thread hijackers, lol. but please, don't get me wrong. I was agreeing with everyone about dealing with drug seekers. I hate it as much as everyone! I was saying that I will actually call them on their crap and tell them to stop it sometimes. Drug seekers are the worst patients to ever care for, IMO. They suck the life out of you! I can't stand them. It's constant, nonstop manipulation and lies. I despise them too. I'd rather poke my eyeballs out than deal with them! or THEIR eyeballs if I wouldn't go to jail. And yes, I think their behaviors are obvious. Sometimes not at first, which is why I said I give them the benefit of the doubt at first. But it doesn't take long to recognize the behaviors does it? They are THE WORST ever!
  3. southernbeegirl

    Sometimes it's hard to tell a drug seeker from a patient in pain.

    I also want to say something but am NOT preaching or trying to ruin a vent thread, k? I have posted about this before I think. My first husband lived in horrible pain. He had porphyria and would be in the hospital for 2-3 months at a time sometimes. It caused severe neuropathy, especially to his abdomen and prostate. He was on IV morphine even at home. (That's where I started using drugs like a junkie. I stole from him.) He looked like a biker...long hair, tatoos, rode a harley. He lived in pain all the time. I wish I could tell you the times i saw nurses refuse to give him prn pain meds because he fell asleep. When you live in pain, you have to sleep, so their bodies adjust. They also don't show pain on their faces like we do. I witnessed some horrible treatment to him by nurses and doctors both. It still makes me mad to think about it. I know I always try to give the patient the benefit of the doubt. at first at least.
  4. southernbeegirl

    Sometimes it's hard to tell a drug seeker from a patient in pain.

    I always just give what is ordered. I'm so tired of drug seekers too. The patients in LTC are getting younger and younger. When we see a young person (40s, 50s) on the admit list, we all dread it because it seems they are the ones that always have the drug seeking behaviors. Really though, it is so much less stressful, for me anyways, to just give it. I used to make deals with people that I would bring it when it was time if they didn't try to get it early. I'm also the last person you want to try to manipulate because, as an addict, been there done that and I will call you on it. There is no way I could work in an ER. I had to go to the ER on thanksgiving after falling and hurting my back. When I first said what I was there for, I got the "here we go again" looks of them thinking I was drug seeking on a holiday. The first 15 minutes were not very nice for me but once they realized I really was hurt, they completely changed and took awesome care of me. i didn't take offense to the first part of the visit as I know what they were thinking. I thanked them a bunch when I left.
  5. southernbeegirl

    Sometimes it's hard to tell a drug seeker from a patient in pain.

    No, there is not a difference. I am a drug addict in recovery, almost 8 years now. I also suffer from chronic back pain that is, at time, almost crippling. I have struggled, with my doctor, to find a pain regimen that works for me that is the least amount of pain med possible. I have been on tramadol for 5 years now. Dependence vs addiction? you can say there is a difference all day long but I assure you, those are only words. Dependence and addiction are one and the same. I tried to take myself of of tramadol a year ago. I had convinced myself that I didn't need it. I went through 7 days of hell from the withdrawal, despite having a husband that is a drug/alcohol counselor who detoxed me with a small amount of benzo as is done inpatient. It was also apparent after 2 weeks that I had no choice but to take something for the pain as I could not stand up straight. So am I dependent on the drug? Yes. As a result of taking it 3 times a day, am I also addicted...yes again. I don't know if I have addictive behaviors because I am so scarred to not have the drug due to the pain or my disease. But really, what does it matter in the end? You can call it whatever you want but they are one an the same, IMO.
  6. southernbeegirl

    Ok people, face facts: Staffing in LTC is always going to be outrageous!

    great replies guys, thanks!
  7. southernbeegirl

    Ok people, face facts: Staffing in LTC is always going to be outrageous!

    I'm kind of shy
  8. All these threads about staffing ratios are driving me nuts! I have worked LTC for 16 years now. Staffing is what it is people. It is not going to change or get better. It is what it is. The decision you need to make is "Do I want to work in LTC?". Be realistic about the job. If you continually have these feelings of things are unfair and you think you can do something about it when noone has been able to for years and years, then you are always going to be disappointed. There is no middle ground...you love it or you hate it. I hate to sound jaded but all these whining staff posts are driving me nuts! Continually complaining will do nothing but put you on a radar at work you do not want to be on. And if you think going over your DON's head to the administrator is the right choice, think again people. It's time to look at the job logically. Life is unfair. Grow up. if you accept the job...then do it! If you don't like it...then stop whining and do something about your own life....get a new job! sorry for the rant....
  9. did you think all the extra "!" would help us answer this?
  10. southernbeegirl

    How do I get back up on my feet

    How do you help yourself? Just do it. Stop wallowing in self pity and put one foot in front of the other. Not to be crash but how are we supposed to know how to help you if you can't help yourself?
  11. southernbeegirl

    If I see one more post titled....

    I'm staging a site wide intervention for you people. Your cowbell addiction is taking over!
  12. southernbeegirl

    If I see one more post titled....

    I would go with the pink ones. The purple ones kinda make your butt look big, becky:smokin:
  13. southernbeegirl

    Advice to the LTC nurse...

    Ooh this list is great! I am so stealing it. Thanks again!
  14. southernbeegirl

    Advice to the LTC nurse...

    We have no choice about our "handwritten" orders. Although hospitals are completely online, SNFs are not. When we get an admission, the entire process much be handwritten by us. A normal SNF admit takes 2 hours minimum to complete and it is all handwritten. Our pharmacies only print our MARS and orders once a month, at the beginnning of the month. So while we REALLY appreciate your typed orders, please don't blame us for our handwritten ones. We have no control over these things. So while we do enough to drive yall nuts, some things are out of our hands.
  15. southernbeegirl

    Advice to the LTC nurse...

    Thank you guys so much for all the replies! I have shared much of this with my coworkers. I think we are doing a much better job. As for the poster that stated something about us sending dying, DNR patients to the ER. Please believe you me...it is NOT our idea. We feel like idiots doing this. Sometimes you just have no choice when a family is faced with the impending death of their mom/dad and they suddenly want them transferred. Sometimes no matter what you say, it won't change their mind or help them accept it any better. I always try to be honest about this when I call report but whatcha gonna do, ya know? I recently had a wife change her husband to a full code while he was on the stretcher dead as a doornail. ugh.
  16. southernbeegirl

    What is the dumbest order you ever read?

    Stat Banana.