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Scooby484k

Scooby484k

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Scooby484k's Latest Activity

  1. Scooby484k

    Calling all AI duPont Hospital RNs

    Currently working at CHOP in Philly, but I'm moving to Wilmington soon. How is AI duPont? What is the salary like for an RN with 3+ years of experience? Any pointers would be very appreciated!!! :bowingpur
  2. Currently working in Philadelphia, looking to move to the Wilmington area -- there's one catch. I was blessed to get into the federal Nursing Education Loan Repayment Program through HRSA, and to transfer to another hospital, it absolutely MUST meet their criteria for a critical shortage facility. Unfortunately, there is no list out there that I have ever seen posted. My biggest career interest lies at A.I. duPont because I'm a pediatric nurse -- anyone there know if it has eligibility?
  3. Scooby484k

    Is it possible to get a job at CHOP?

    I posted on this very topic November 2009 in this same thread... scan through the posts to check it out.
  4. Scooby484k

    Is it possible to get a job at CHOP?

    At the moment, I happen to know that the NICU (and PICU) are having staffing issues because of the hospital's acuity and general census. We NEED nurses... sure, a new nurse would have to be oriented, but (while I cannot speak directly for the NICU, since I'm a PICU nurse) we're always hiring new grads. So give it a shot, and good luck!
  5. Scooby484k

    Best Pain Chart Ever!!

    I know! It's really great, I sent it to all my nursing friends. I love her blog!
  6. Hi all, (This is a re-post from the Pennsylvania section) (FYI: I live in Center City, Philadelphia.) So I've been doing some hard thinking on going back to school to be a CRNA... I love everything I've heard/read and seen about it, but I'm still hesitant. Right now, my biggest reservation is that I'll drown myself in debt... I went to a very expensive school for my BSN (second-degree), and already spend a significant portion of my paycheck on student loans. I have a really crappy savings (due to the aforementioned loans ), so I'd definitely need help if I were to go back to school. "Help" meaning living expenses, books, courses, the entire shebang. My questions are: - What financial aid do programs in the area (Philly) offer? Are some better than others? - Did you have to take out any alternative loans (loans not offered through the school or federal government)? - What do you look for in a CRNA program of study that makes it better/worse than others? (Not financial, but still important...) - After graduation, do you find it difficult to get out of debt? Are there hospitals that help foot the bill for working for them, and does that seem to be a good way to go? - Understandably, the CRNA programs discourage working during the program... has anyone attempted it / been successful to pull some hours on the side at a hospital? Was this too stressful? I find that financial stress often outweighs the stress of studying for me... I guess I'm just looking for some insight before I take the plunge and start applying... I appreciate your responses....
  7. Scooby484k

    Calling All Philly CRNAs!

    Hi all, (FYI: I live in Center City, Philadelphia.) So I've been doing some hard thinking on going back to school to be a CRNA... I love everything I've heard/read and seen about it, but I'm still hesitant. Right now, my biggest reservation is that I'll drown myself in debt... I went to a very expensive school for my BSN (second-degree), and already spend a significant portion of my paycheck on student loans. I have a really crappy savings (due to the aforementioned loans ), so I'd definitely need help if I were to go back to school. "Help" meaning living expenses, books, courses, the entire shebang. My questions are: - What financial aid do programs in the area (Philly) offer? Are some better than others? - Did you have to take out any alternative loans (loans not offered through the school or federal government)? - What do you look for in a CRNA program of study that makes it better/worse than others? (Not financial, but still important...) - After graduation, do you find it difficult to get out of debt? Are there hospitals that help foot the bill for working for them, and does that seem to be a good way to go? - Understandably, the CRNA programs discourage working during the program... has anyone attempted it / been successful to pull some hours on the side at a hospital? Was this too stressful? I find that financial stress often outweighs the stress of studying for me... I guess I'm just looking for some insight before I take the plunge and start applying... I appreciate your responses....
  8. Scooby484k

    New nurse needs help moving to Philly!

    Sorry... for some reason I thought you mentioned that you'd moved TO center city FROM Roxborough... my bad. Good luck!
  9. Scooby484k

    New nurse needs help moving to Philly!

    Depends on where you live....I'm all about the buses. I take the 42 bus on Walnut to CHOP - it runs roughly every 10 minutes and drops you off right in front of the entrance (nice on rainy days!). There is also the 40 bus which runs along Lombard, it's not as frequent or as dependable, but also a good choice. The 21 bus runs on Walnut and would drop you off at Walnut and 34th (you'd walk a couple blocks, but there's a Starbuck's on the corner and I often stop there anyway...) Those are the three main buses. Of course, lots of people bike or walk, but depending on where you live and what time your shift starts and ends, that could be either a great idea or kind of crappy. Check out bus schedules on septa.org Good luck! Kelly
  10. This may not exactly be what you're asking, but..... At our hospital, only neurosurgery docs are allowed to collect specimens. We can change the EVD bags with sterile technique, but that is the limit. Generally speaking, if an infection is suspected, the child is cultured in the OR when they are externalized, then started on antibiotics. Three consecutive days of negative cultures collected by neurosurgery are required before the infection is "cleared" ... well, not cleared exactly, but the time it took to reach this stage helps determine the length of the course of IV abx that child needs (usually a few weeks), and also determines when the child's shunt can be reinternalized. (They usually wait until the antibiotics are at therapeutic levels before they start checking... although honestly neurosurg doesn't always stick to their own policies). Hope that helps a little.
  11. Scooby484k

    Is it possible to get a job at CHOP?

    I'm feeling particularly chatty after today's shift (don't know how, I worked my butt off today and am about 10 minutes away from passing out... maybe I'm giddy?). So I figured I'd post another one for you... If you want to be in an ICU, the managers will want to be sure you can handle the stress. They might ask you if you've ever been present during a code, and if you've ever worked around end-of-life care for patients (being able to accept death and the environment that surrounds it often separates the ICU nurses from other nurses). They're looking for maturity, an ability to do your job without becoming overwhelmed by the fast-paced and stressful environment, and this is for good reason: they want you to STAY working there, and they want you to handle stressful situations well (for example, completely falling apart and losing your ability to be a nurse during a difficult assignment is a problem when the patient needs care). They might also want to ask you a simple question: Why do you want to work in the ICU? Be honest, but put some thought into your answer beforehand so you can express yourself well. As for critical thinking... try to find a time when you put two and two together about a patient and didn't need someone to spell it out for you... a time when you knew, based on a patient's condition (vital signs, assessment findings, etc.), that something specific needed to be done. For example, it could be as easy as knowing to notify the doctor (if an oncology patient develops a fever, or a patient's neuro status changed suddenly and pupils are unequal, etc. etc.). They might ask, they might not. Depends on the manager. Anyway, I hope that helps a little. Good luck!
  12. Scooby484k

    Is it possible to get a job at CHOP?

    Hey there, What unit are you applying to work in? I'm currently working in the PICU, so the strengths managers are looking for might be a bit different from another unit. Basically, be sure to come ready knowing examples of times you've used critical thinking skills, advocated for a patient/family (we're big on family-centered care), and it never hurts to know a bit about the hospital. I made sure that I was familiar with their mission statement, that always helps. Good luck!
  13. Scooby484k

    Stress levels of ICU vs CRNA

    (Totally off topic, not a CRNA, buuuuut....) I would agree -- I'm in the ICU, and I completely understand the stress level you are experiencing. I came from an accelerated BSN program, and for a new grad--especially a new nurse--it is totally expected for you to be stressed out. It's sometimes very disconcerting to be a new nurse (I'm only 5 months out myself), and you made a decision to put yourself in one of the most difficult ICUs out there. Don't take it as an indication of your ability/inability to be a CRNA... you're still too new to know. IF, after you've been in an ICU for a while, you notice yourself shying away from the more acute cases, you can always re-evaluate yourself and change your options. That's the beauty of nursing. And good for you, recognizing how unhealthy the ICU environment you were in was for you... I think some may pass if off as a weakness, but there's no need to burn yourself out before you even find your feet. Always time to up the acuity later on, when you're ready for it.
  14. Scooby484k

    Why so Interested????

    NRSNFL, great response! I'm in total agreement with you, also considering jumping onto the anesthesia wagon at some point. I'm in an ICU, a bit sick of all the paperwork/double-documenting and constantly playing the middle man (while being underpaid), and frankly missing the detail-oriented, specialized activities that I thought I'd be doing more of when I started here. The ICU can be great at times, but I need more of a challenge. Autonomy is fantastic, too. We'll see if I decide to make the jump into CRNA school -- it's a huge time, financial, and mental investment, and I can't say I'd make it just for the money... although I won't lie and say it's not a nice reward for putting my nose to the grindstone.
  15. Scooby484k

    Precepting in the PICU

    PS - you can get the book I mentioned for around $65 on Amazon, probably cheaper if you go to Half.com or get it used somewhere.... good luck!
  16. Scooby484k

    Precepting in the PICU

    Congrats! I'm a relatively new grad who also spent some nursing school time in the PICU (and now I work in one). When I was there, I found this book helpful (albeit a bit thick): Core Curriculum for Pediatric Critical Care Nursing (2006) by Margaret C. Slota (editor) ISBN-13: 978-1-4160-0157-7 It has a some case studies in the back that I thought were good. Good luck!!