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RedRobin8

RedRobin8

Endoscopy
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RedRobin8 has 10 years experience and specializes in Endoscopy.

wife, mom of 2 teens

RedRobin8's Latest Activity

  1. RedRobin8

    Emergency Bronchoscopy in middle of the night

    I work in Endoscopy and we stock the standard scopes, including the Bronchoscopes. The ICU recently purchased disposable bronchs, but rarely use them because the Pulmonologists state they don't have a sufficient diameter for large plugs. (So we still have to come in on call now for ICU plugs)
  2. RedRobin8

    Where are the middle age nurses working?

    Thanks for each of your replies! A lot of good info for me to consider.
  3. Hi all, I have been a second career nurse going on five years now. Love the field, have been in two different hospitals with a great resume full of well-rounded experience and references. My concern is more social than professional. Where are all the nurses around my age? (40's). I am guessing some move up into management, but I am still working on my BSN. I'm ready to settle into something long term, and would like to work where there is some social connections among staff. It's an odd feeling to discover that among so many 20 something's I could be socially irrelevant, since I am not currently dating via social media, drinking, planning a wedding or having babies. I'm viewed like the mom on the unit, but that makes for mostly one-sided conversations. It's an unfamiliar feeling to feel lonely in a crowd. ( I'm not a hermit, mind you, I am very active socially outside of work.). I'd love your suggestions.
  4. RedRobin8

    Very discouraged new grad.

    Ditto to both of the above comments. It takes a little while to discern whether these are normal growing pains or perhaps not the unit for you. No one tells you how different nursing school is from the real nursing world. Nothing can prepare you for that. One of my very good friends went through the exact same experiences as you, and she recognized that she had poor preceptors and no support in a high turnover unit that had been decimated by half of the staff leaving in a mass exodus due to very poor management changes. She also struggled with the charting, which she came to realize was because 1) she is an extremely detail oriented person, and 2) we have a ridiculous amount of electronic charting which keeps us in front of a computer for more time than at the bedside. Additionally, I can think of very few reasons to "write up" a new grad...we are there to help each other to grow, not point fingers so quickly. I have been an RN for one year on a step-down (neuro) unit this month, and only in the last few weeks did I come to realize that I am starting to find my own comfort level...but I still ask questions for anything about which I am uncertain (daily), and I also strive to reassure the new grads coming behind me with their own uncertainty. I have had nurses with 5 years' experience tell me they learn new things every day. Confer with your fellow grads, and you will find that some will spend the first 6-12 months somewhere in misery, only to discover it is just not suited to their skills and strengths. The experience is not a waste, and it is okay to take your experience to another unit. There is no wrong answer...just keep putting one foot in front of another, you will find the path that is right for you. By the way, after 9 months my friend applied to a critical care unit after she could take no more negativity, and has found a friendlier, detail-oriented unit with 1:2 ratio that suits her perfectly. Best of luck to you!!
  5. RedRobin8

    Does a CNA have to wipe butts?

    If you want to work in the hospital, it sounds like you might be better suited to be a unit secretary.
  6. RedRobin8

    Patients grades to affect hospital medicare reimbursements

    My final thought on this topic: My husband reminded me that those of us who experienced the big corporate world in the 80's will recall that our performance as employees was ranked on a 1-10 system as well. However, we were told that 1's and 10's were not given without written documentation of specific supporting incidences. This is because 1's and 10's are rare, exceptional scores and that the majority of performance in all arenas falls along a bell curve. This was effectively drilled in me, as i also give 8's or 9's for fabulous service when polled. The only effective way to express the new system to those being polled is to put the dollar amount of cut funds beside the ranking they choose based on the cost of their stay.
  7. RedRobin8

    Patients grades to affect hospital medicare reimbursements

    That's probably why our facility stopped contracting with physician groups, and instead hired physicians directly as employees. They, too, will be directly affected by the financial impact.
  8. RedRobin8

    Patients grades to affect hospital medicare reimbursements

    Our management has been talking to us about this looming policy for the last 6 months, it's almost here. They are scared to death because they know 10's are not freely given, and the money will definitely be cut. Hiring is frozen, and raises are on hold. The cuts are being made NOW so we can all adjust to working with less. I work on a neuro unit, where a majority of what we see is altered mental status due to dementia, post-op brain surgery, CVA or other conditions. Our patient population usually cannot specifically recall their care, so I don't understand how their ratings could even be considered. Very frustrating, but I am glad I had a job upon graduation. My classmates behind me will not be so fortunate.
  9. RedRobin8

    Are 12 hour shifts going extinct?

    I love my 12 hour shifts, although we do have some 8's sprinkled in here and there. I heard from a former California nurse that one disadvantage of ever becoming a unionized hospital (not a risk here) is that only 8 hour shift are allowed. I would work elsewhere if that happened.
  10. RedRobin8

    Nursing Profession

    Personal characteristics needed: compassion for the scared patients and families; patience for the talkers and frantic ones; tough shell and ability to hold one's tongue for the manipulators and rude patients or staff; persistence, listening ear and ability to give a decent, hot bath for the ones who express fear as anger; and insight to determine where the patient is psychologically. Very few patients bounce through the door with a genuine smile, happy to be there. You need to be flexible enough to apply pertinent characteristics to the current needs of the patient...this tends to make application of nursing skills a lot more effective.
  11. RedRobin8

    Bon Secours School of Nursing

    Hi ICBBG! I chuckled when I received the e-mail referencing a response to this 3 year old post, because I JUST FINISHED school last Wednesday! Woohoo - what a ride! I read through all 15 pages again for a bit of nostalgia, and recalled all of our excitement and anxiety at each anticipated step in the process. Do not even think about other GPA's and TEAS scores, because every class is different, with a different pool of applicants. I'm not sure what you mean by non-traditional students, but the fact that you have a college degree puts you at the head of the pack. Best of luck to you and let us know what happens!! Robin
  12. RedRobin8

    1+ 2+ 3+ Edema Rating Scale?

    One teacher taught us that the pitting edema ratings of +1 through +4 correspond to puddle, pond, lake, ocean.
  13. RedRobin8

    RNs who have never worked bedside - What do you do?

    These are great ideas. I entered nursing school with the plan of hospital work, but after the economy tanked, my husband had to extend his hours to 11-12 hours per day. Both of us cannot work these hours with 2 active teenagers, so I have started to consider niches with more conventional hours for when I finish in February 2010.
  14. RedRobin8

    Top 10 Myths of the "MURSE"

    I work on a cardiac step down unit, and the frequent flyer senior ladies LOOOOOOOOOVE their 'murses'. Strong, protective, heroic care in their eyes. While I was giving one little lady in her late 80's a bath, she told me her 'murse' was easy on the eyes. I nearly choked.
  15. RedRobin8

    Nursing School GPA

    What's a GRE? I'm a low 3.x student, and might need whatever that is to continue my studies.
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