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Susan9608

Susan9608

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Susan9608's Latest Activity

  1. Susan9608

    Required to watch circumcision?

    Your assumptions that if people thoroughly researched circumcision and how it was done would lead them NOT to circumcise their boys are erroneous. I'm a nurse; I have been for 8 years. I've worked in general pediatrics, NICU, and currently PICU. I have assisted with more circs than I can count. I'm currently 37 weeks pregnant with my first child, a boy. My husband and I *thoroughly* discussed the issue of circumcision with each other, our OB, the pediatrician we chose, and the PICU doctors I work with. (Incidentally, everyone from my OB to the pediatrician to my PICU intensivists recommended we circ. our baby.) We watched several videos of different circ. methods, and discussed analgesia/anesthetics for the procedure. It's hard for me to imagine how much more thorough we could have been in researching this issue. And we have decided to go ahead and circ. our baby. I certainly hope you aren't this judgemental about too many other areas/issues in nursing ... otherwise, I feel very sorry for your future patients.
  2. Susan9608

    Most embarrassing thing that happened to you at work

    I was doing trach teaching with a patient's mother and father, and had been sitting for about an hour. I was 26 weeks pregnant at the time, showing a little, but unwilling to go to the expense of maternity scrub pants. So I was wearing my old drawstring pants, tied loosely. Some how, during my teaching, my pants became totally untied. When I got up to leave the room, they slowly started slipping down and got all the way to my knees before I noticed. At that point, I grabbed them, said, "OOPS!", and ran out of the room. Of course, I was wearing holey underwear that day. The parents laughed every time I went into the room for the rest of the day.
  3. Susan9608

    Have you/would you refuse certain patients while pregnant

    I'm currently pregnant (32 weeks), and I work in pediatric intensive care. It's been very difficult to find appropriate patient assignments without effecting the workings of my unit. I spoke to my OB first and foremost about what patients are appropriate for me. In the very beginning, I had no weight limit, so that wasn't an issue. However, H1N1 was a big concern, as we had an abundance of it in my unit, and as the CDC was reporting it to be very dangerous to pregnant women. My OB wrote me a medical excuse, saying "NO H1N1 patients." As far as CMV, my ob tested me for it - I thought for sure I'd have antibodies already and have nothing to worry about, but surprisingly, I don't. So I am excused from taking CMV patients as well. CMV is one of the TORCH diseases, so it's really not worth the risk to care for them when you have no immunity. The only other things I avoid are patients receiving chemo and patients who need to be taken to radiology procedures (CTs, extensive x-rays, etc.) Also, since my uterus is now out of my pelvis, I am not to solely lift more than 30 pounds, so they try to assign me lighter patients. The end result is that I have to be very flexible about everything else - I have to take up the slack some how, and that usually occurs by me taking more admits, taking more of the chronic patients, etc - those things that aren't the most fabulous assignments, but are safe and free up everyone else to do what I can't.
  4. Susan9608

    Worried about being sued

    Thanks for all the opinions and suggestions. I realize that there have to be damages in order for someone to be compensated in a lawsuit. However, just because they aren't likely to prevail doesn't mean that they can't try and make my life miserable in the process. I'm waiting to hear back from my supervisor at this point.
  5. Susan9608

    Worried about being sued

    Thanks. I did document everything, from being called into the patient's room, to finding the trach dislodged, to the aftermath that followed. The MDs have done a great job trying to explain that trachs become dislodged often, which is why we do such extensive training with the families on how to handle trach emergencies. I'm going to email my supervisor right now.
  6. Susan9608

    Worried about being sued

    I have concerns that a patient family might try to sue me. There was an event with their child, in which the child's trach became dislodged, causing the child to desat and brady. Child required about 1 minute of CPR and 1 round of epi. Post-episode, all MRIs and CT scans have been at child's baseline, so it seems there was no permanent ischemic injury. I have not been assigned to this child again. Whenever I come across the parents, they make comments to me about how I'm the nurse who wrenched [child's] trach out. Or they accuse me of blaming the episode on their family (as in the family pulled the trach out.) They say something every time they pass me in the hall, in the waiting room, or even in front of other families. These are not the most stable people. They are from out of town, have other kids, and a history of drug abuse. They also don't seem to be the most book-smart. While this may seem like a terrible stereo type, they seem like exactly the type of family who would pursue a lawsuit over any perceived error in their child's care. I'm not sure what to do with my concerns about this. I know that I did not pull the child's trach out; rather, I was called into the room for something unrelated, noticed the child's sats dropping, and upon assessment, discovered the trach was dislodged. So I know I didn't do anything wrong, but that doesn't mean that the family doesn't think I did something wrong. I don't know if I should consult with my manager or supervisor or possibly the hospital's legal department. Has anyone else ever been sued or thought they were going to be sued? Possibly I'm worrying about nothing, but I'd rather be prepared.
  7. Susan9608

    Terrible clinical day, nurses don't seem to care.

    I read all 16 pages of this thread. I'm very proud of myself. Maybe I've just got "nursing student burnout" but had I been the nurse in the OP's situation, I probably would have said something along the lines of, "Not your patient, not your business," and I probably would have asked the student nurse to leave my patient's room, if he/she wasn't actually assigned there. Because, of course, all the time that was spent with my patient was time taken away from the patient the student nurse was actually assigned to. I guess I'm just mean that way. Oh well ...
  8. Susan9608

    How old is too old to continue breast feeding?

    I"m a vegan, actually. And an animal rights activist - so I don't find cows to be "dirty" animals. At least, not any dirtier than humans ....
  9. Susan9608

    How old is too old to continue breast feeding?

    As a nurse - specializing in pediatrics and having spent a year in the NICU - I know all the arguments about "breast being best." Personally, though, I find breast feeding repulsive. While I accept that people will breast feed in public, I still don't care for it - I don't like to witness it. I also, as someone else said, don't care to engage another person in conversation while they are breast feeding their child. I know this about myself, so when I have a family who is interested in breast feeding or already committed to it, I will order the pumps for them (if baby is intubated or NPO, etc), get their breast feeding trays (we provide meal trays for breast feeding mothers), and show them how to work the pump. I do all of the things I'm required to do to support our patients' families. If they want information, however, I am honest and tell people I'm not the best person to ask. Then I'll go get one of our pro-breast feeding nurses to speak to the mother. Generally, these nurses are more than happy to share their knowledge, expertise, and experiences with families who are trying to decide which direction to go in. Or I'll call in our lactation consultants. As far as my co-workers go, many of them are breast feeders, and I cover their patients during their many, many pumping breaks. I do this a) because I have to; b) because I want the same consideration when I want to take a break; and c) because it's part of being a team player at work. I also endure them putting their breast milk in our staff fridge, right next to my lunch, even though it grosses me out to no end. My point, I guess, is that even though I carry out all the things I'm required to do and put up with in regards to breast feeding, I still find it distasteful. I'm careful not to push my anti-breast feeding opinions on others, and I would appreciate the same from others. Being turned off - so to speak - by breast feeding, despite knowing all the benefits, is my personal opinion about it and I have as much right to my opinion as any pro-breast feeding person has to theirs. My opinion about it doesn't make me less of a nurse or any worse a human being, especially since I go to great pains to ensure that I don't inflict my opinion on others. It would be nice if some of the more ardently pro-breast feeding individuals would take the same approach, as most I have encountered are so vehement about breast feeding that they take any opposition as a personal challenge and feel compelled to try to convince me and prove me wrong.
  10. Susan9608

    2-Year-Old Fights For Life As Insurance Runs Out

    I don't agree that these people are being "penalized" - I don't think Medicaid was ever intended to be an adjunct to insurance coverage you already have, because, in theory, by having insurance coverage of some kind, you presumably have income and/or assets. Medicaid, I believe, was intended for those whom have nothing and no way to obtain even the most basic of health care needs. I'm sure that whatever these individuals have already paid into the system has already been used up by their child's complex medical needs any way. I just don't think it's reasonable to expect the government to pick up the tab for extraordinary procedures ... especially not when both money and health care resources are so finite that providing all these extraordinary measures for ONE individual may mean that other individuals so without some of the most basic things. And whomever said that there is plenty of money - what about Ft. knox and all that gold ... I'm sorry, but I find that kind of a ridiculous stance. Money is finite; the gold in Ft. Knox is used to give value against our paper currency. Printing more and more money without enough gold to back it is destined to cause extreme devaluation of currency - which is exactly what happened to the Confederacy during the Civil War. There is NO WAY government sponsored health care can provide that level of care/financial assistance to EVERY individual in need ... there is not enough money or health care recourses to make that possible ... so they have to focus on doing the most good for the most people.
  11. Susan9608

    2-Year-Old Fights For Life As Insurance Runs Out

    I think it's unreasonable to ask any public funded health care system, like Medicaid, to absorb the costs of such extensive, significant, and uncertain procedures on the behalf of ONE single patient, especially when doing so compromises the ability of the system to provide for others. I think her family should certainly keep on hoping and trying to raise funds themselves, whether through their jobs or donations or whatever.
  12. Susan9608

    2-Year-Old Fights For Life As Insurance Runs Out

    Personally, I believe that there comes a time when we all have to admit that something we want or possibly need is no longer financially feasible. I know that sounds harsh, and I'm sure people will denounce me and say that if it were my child, I'd feel differently. Perhaps I would - I can't know because I haven't been in that situation. But it's impossible to separate the financial realities from things, especially when you consider that both money and health care resources are finite - there are only a limited number of both to go around. People hate that reality because it means that there are hard and ugly choices that have to be made, but that doesn't make it any less a reality. This little girl already received one major transplant surgery of multiple organs, which her family states came from a single donor. If you think about that fact alone ... the fact that this ONE child received multiple organs, which theoretically could have helped multiple individuals (who, I'm sure, are just as loved and valuable as this child) ... the situation already seems unfair. Ethical and sound medicine, perhaps, but unfair to all the others out there who need organs and didn't get them because they went to this child instead of them. But when you factor in that she now needs a SECOND transplant of all those same multiple organs (which may or may not be successful - you can't know), the situation, in my opinion, becomes both unfair and unethical, especially when you consider that there simply are no means for this to be financed. I have nothing against Medicaid or universal health care; in fact I'm generally very supportive of government-sponsored health care. But those systems have to help the most people they can with a limited amount of resources, and an already overburdened system can't possibly provide multiple, million dollar transplants to every individual. I can see the logic of saying, "That's enough." No one is telling the family not to try to raise the money themselves, and I certainly doubt the hospital is going to throw them out and refuse to give treatment to a dying child. Just the expectation will be that the family some how has to finance it - personal responsibility for resources used and the opportunity taken. The opportunity is there for treatment, just not at the expense of the system. And to me, that makes perfect sense.
  13. Susan9608

    Is it true that a BSN will be mandatory soon?

    That's the licensing portion - not the educational portion. And even that is not totally standardized, because there is the NCLEX-RN and the NCLEX-LVN. So, while you might not have patients asking you questions about your background, I have patients asking me quite often, "Are you an RN or an LVN?" "Did you go to El Centro (community college) or a university?" What's that old saying ... "All generalizations are false" ? I find this sort of thing especially prevalent in hospitals with dress codes, where LVNs wear different colored scrubs from the RNs ... it seems to lead to questions from patients on the differences between LVNs and RNs and then the differences between RNs themselves, even more so in hospitals where BSN is placed on name badges. I think it would be beneficial to have a standardized educational entry point into nursing ... for one thing, then course content could be structured by nurses and wouldn't be "fluff" as so many people keep saying. I also think raising the minimum educational requirement to a bachelor's degree is important to distinguish nursing as a profession, rather than a vocation.
  14. Susan9608

    Is it true that a BSN will be mandatory soon?

    I don't think anyone - or hardly anyone, because perhaps there have been a few - is arguing that ADN nurses are not qualified bedside nurses. I think the idea of having a BSN as the entry point into nursing is to standardize the entry point into nursing and to raise the standing of nursing from vocation to profession. I'm sure that, some where, there are people working on doing just this ... not so much to protect patient from "unqualified ADN nurses" as you said, but for the reasons I stated. You may not agree that nursing needs a standardized entry point, but you can't contend that with one, we wouldn't be arguing this point, at least, and could at least be at each other about something else.
  15. We get nothing to precept/orient. RTs, however, get an extra $2.50/hour for orienting anyone, even high school students who come in to shadow them for a single shift. Doesn't seem fair.
  16. Susan9608

    Is it true that a BSN will be mandatory soon?

    I didn't say RTs were techs. I said "RTs also only manage RT stuff." Totally separate from the "techs" I was discussing earlier in the paragraph.