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jms01

jms01 BSN

New New Nurse
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jms01's Latest Activity

  1. jms01

    What if I'm not meant to be a bedside nurse?

    Thank you all for your positive feedback! I truly appreciate it. I think I'm realizing day to day that I'm definitely comfortable with patient education and overall patient interaction. I love getting to help the doctors with visits. What I really need to brush up on is learning the ins and outs of the neuro pharm and reading about the neuro disorders the docs treat. I'm hopeful that I will feel confident enough in this role to jump back onto the floor, hopefully a neuro floor. I'm really confident interviewing, so I hope I can find something neuro related soon.
  2. jms01

    What if I'm not meant to be a bedside nurse?

    Thank you all for your feedback! I appreciate it so so much! I’ve definitely been hard on myself since leaving tele because I saw my peers succeed and me falling behind constantly, despite my best efforts. I’m eager to go back because I don’t want to give up on myself, I’ve only been a nurse for about 4 months, but I’m not sure what floor what be a good fit for me. With the neuro experience I’m gaining, I’ve been doing a lot of triage and getting to help the doctors with their new patient visits, which I enjoy. I’m learning how to do H&Ps, something I thought I wouldn’t get to do until I became an NP. I’m just wondering where these skills would be transferable in acute care though. I’ve always wanted to try working in the ICU, esp neuro ICU, but I find that my lack of experience would not help me land a job like that. I think I’m really missing the hands on skills the most. Would trying wound care or infusion be a jump for me given my experience?
  3. I graduated w/ my BSN last Spring and ended up on starting a tele-turned-COVID floor last fall. I felt very fortunate that I got a hospital job, but 2 months in, I was starting to realize how things weren't making any sense. It wasn't just me that noticed my lack of knowledge or piecing things together, but I could tell my preceptor was getting frustrated with me too. She said I had no sense of urgency for things; I struggled to think critically, I was always so task oriented (nursing is a second career for me). I didn't struggle with the hands on skills, I felt like that was my strength and I knew from my friends who are nurses that you can't be so hard on yourself so much. I took every little victory on the floor as a win for me (like putting in an IV on my own), and there were days I felt so stupid, I'd drive home after my shift crying. I also thought my educator was there to support me, but I was belittled over things I didn't realize would be thrown in my face. During one meeting with her, she spoke negatively of the fact that I took multiple attempts to get an IV in on a mannequin arm and draw blood from a PICC line. This was during the first week of orientation, and I had never done either in nursing school. From the beginning, I didn't feel supported, but I pushed through. Fast forward weeks later, and she was belittling me again over the same thing. I don't know if the combo of my educator and preceptor together contributed to my lack of success on a 6:1 tele/covid floor, but I so badly wanted to succeed. At 10 weeks, I was told to go to nights, and I had to say no because I have epilepsy and bc of the nature of my condition, I couldn't put myself at risk. I got transferred to an outpatient neuro clinic, and now I'm basically at a desk all day helping out the doctors, answering "triage" calls and doing med refills. I don't feel like a nurse anymore, I feel like a failure almost every day now, to the point where I cry about it. I don't feel like I know anything, and I didn't feel like I would be a safe nurse on the floor because I didn't know how to pick up on things on my own after 10 weeks. I didn't know how to critically think, I was still working on it. Overall, I feel like a failure. I can't be the only one who has felt like this. I question myself constantly about that experience. I had so much faith in myself that I would succeed. I feel so stupid that I couldn't manage the chaos, the ratios, and learn how to do my job.
  4. jms01

    Failed orientation, now what?

    I know I'm not interested in case mgmt, but would actually love to explore the idea of working in a neuro ICU or epilepsy monitoring unit (EMU), but with my background, I don't know if I'd be qualified for it. I know most major hospitals have EMU's, so I'm wondering if I could work in an area specialized like that. Would I be qualified to go into infusion with my background as well? I have so many interests, but I really enjoy using my hands-on clinical skills as well and wouldn't want to lose that. Any feedback is appreciated!
  5. jms01

    Failed orientation, now what?

    Thank you for your kind words. I constantly beat myself because I don’t think I should be a nurse when I live with this illness. I don’t feel like I’m capable of being an RN, let alone an FNP, my end goal. I don’t know where to start as far as jobs go, I barely have floor experience, so who would even take a chance on me if I wanted to try something else?
  6. jms01

    Failed orientation, now what?

    I understand. Sometimes, I question if I should even be a nurse. I think my epilepsy has limited my opportunities at the bedside and home care too, because of the driving. I am feeling pretty down and hopeless as to what I can even do in this field. Maybe I can work from home, but I don’t know how without any experience.
  7. jms01

    Failed orientation, now what?

    Hi! I took the first thing I could get, which was tele, and I never had an interest in cardio. That experience confirmed it for me. I was thankful to have had it regardless, but I did like bedside nursing. Eventually I want to go back for my FNP, but I’m worried that having close to no bedside experience is going to hurt me. I’d love to work in the ICU, even if it’s for a bit, I don’t feel like I see myself working in outpatient clinics unless it’s something like ambulatory surgery, urgent care, wound care, dialysis, or infusion (which I’d love to explore!). Should I be worried that because of my lack of bedside experience I have no chance at any of these opportunities? I’ve always heard of nurses bouncing between specialities, so I’m wondering if it’s possible for me. I want nothing more than develop my clinical skills, and I feel like many of options above are great places to consider.
  8. jms01

    Failed orientation, now what?

    I'm a new nurse, graduated last Summer and I was hired on a PCU and didn't make it past my 12 week orientation. I was told to go to nights after being hired on days because I wasn't getting the hang of things on the floor during days. Unfortunately, I have epilepsy so I can't work nights and had to request an accommodation. As much as I would've liked a longer orientation, that wasn't an option, and neither was going to another floor. I'm fortunate my hospital system was able to place me somewhere else, but I'm now working outpatient neuro and it's not as exciting as the floor. I'm worried that I won't be able to transition to another area of nursing, when I decide I'm ready to look again, because I'm not sure this job really entails much except a lot of phone triage, med refills, and some case mgmt. I thought I knew what I wanted to do as a nurse, but now I'm realizing the floor was too stressful and I didn't feel ready near the end of my orientation. I was hoping to look into wound care or infusion, but many of those jobs require acute care experience, which I lack 😞 I am open to different areas, but I'm worried I may not be an ideal candidate given my lack of hands on skills. The only skills I gained were being tele & IV certified. Does anyone have any words of advice for someone like myself who's still pretty new to the profession? Thank you