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aethereality

aethereality CNA

Acute care
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aethereality has 1 years experience as a CNA and specializes in Acute care.

aethereality's Latest Activity

  1. aethereality

    A&P1 and 5 week CNA program?

    I think taking CNA course along with A&P class is doable. You really need to time manage yourself and be able to plan/schedule things. It's going to be a lot. You will need to discipline yourself to ensure that you're passing both programs. You will need to take care of your health, both physically and emotionally. Your mind needs to be prepared because you may struggle with the actual CNA clinical setting. There's a lot of information for A&P. The information builds up and you need to understand them (not just memorize). Make flashcards, self-quiz, do practice exams, etc. A&P is very important if you plan on going into nursing or med/pharm school. CNA is great experience if you plan on going into nursing. I know there are people who get accepted into nursing program without being a CNA. You don't have to be a CNA but it's a great experience. In addition, if you get a job working as a CNA in the hospital, you will learn a lot and build relationships. Put in the time to think about whether you will be able to commit to the two programs and how you will achieve top grades. Consider how you will manage your time to study and do homework. Know what your goals are and how you will meet the goals. I did not take A&P while working on the CNA program. I did take more than 12 units and still passed all my classes with good grades and got my CNA certification the same semester. Again, it's possible to do both but think about your situation carefully before deciding.
  2. aethereality

    Hopefully taking CNA classes soon, tips/tricks?

    If you are going to work in a nursing home, it may not be possible to do a two-person team to finish assignments. You may still able to get help from other CNAs for different situations but at least, I have not seen a two-person team at my nursing home and where I did my clinical training. Be ready for staffing shortage if that does happen! At the nursing home where I did my clinical training, there was one LVN who had no idea how to reposition patients and did not even respond to call lights. That LVN even told me to ignore the call lights but I still responded because I knew the patient needed help. I also let my instructor know. Therefore, I think CNA work is a great experience for anyone interested in nursing and it helps me to learn about bedside manners, what to look and check for, how I can help nurses and what to tell the nurses, etc. I wholeheartedly agreedwith @beachynurse because I had a hard time differentiating the real CNA skills and the state CNA skills. My instructor even told me that I was showing insubordination and I was struggling during clinicals. Eventually, I learned with the help of my classmates and passed the exam. Do whatever the instructor teach you. Do not follow real CNA skills at your clinical until you have your certification and actually start working. I enrolled in a sponsored CNA class. I will have to pay back the tuition because I got a job offer at a hospital. Start applying to hospital around 4 or 5 months of work. Prepare for interviews. Find the right methods and tips to help you become an efficient, reliable, and compassionate CNA. Even after the CNA preceptor orients you for the actual job, always check the care plan / Kardex or ask the nurse questions. I found out the my preceptor told me the wrong information on patients' continence and incontinence. Ask questions and assess the situation. Patient safety is very important. I started my job as a CNA in March. I always ask for help from other CNAs if I can (even though, the response I get most of the time is they are busy with their patients). If I cannot get other CNAs to help me, I will approach the therapists then the nurses. You work within your scope of practice. Assess everything before you start. Most of the time, I was able to work by myself using the lifts and assessing the circumstances. Each situation varies and you ALWAYS need to assess. Your facility needs to train you properly regarding types of assists, types of lifts, and resources. If the facility you are working at does not have the right resources, do look for another facility unless the facility is the closer one to home or is the only one in your community. As a CNA, you should focus on your tasks and duties for the day. Ask for help when needed and help out when you can. If something suddenly happens such as an emergency or whatever, let the nurse know or the supervisor know. Always let them know if you cannot complete something due to problems unexpectedly happen. The nurse has power and can write you up if they think you are showing them insubordination. At the end of the day, YOU are responsible for your certification. I wish you the best. I love my job and it is helping me on my journey to apply to nursing school.
  3. I will be having CNA orientation at the hospital in two weeks. Can anyone tell me what is a telemetry/medsurg floor like and anything about CNA duties/tasks?
  4. aethereality

    Am I expected to position and ambulate patients by myself?

    I started my job as a CNA in March. Like you, I am short and sometimes need help to re-position or ambulating patients. I always ask for help from other CNAs if I can (even though, the response I get most of the time is they are busy with their patients). If I cannot get other CNAs to help me, I will approach the therapists then the nurses. I have to agree with @Kooky Korky, BSN, RN. A nurse license will not be responsible for you. You work within your scope of practice. Assess everything before you start. I had a patient who wanted to be in the wheelchair each day. The patient had a history of stroke, shortness of breath and was heavy. I always tried to ask someone to help me to get the patient situated with the lift then I can handle the rest. If I cannot get someone to help me with that patient, I do not get the patient on the lift and subsequently on the wheelchair by myself. Patient safety is #1 for me. I do re-position the patient if I can. Raise the bed to a comfortable level for you and raise the end of bed slightly higher than the head of bed. It makes re-position easier or moving the patient up to higher in the bed. I had another patient who was having DVT and said he was in pain every hour. He asked to be taken to the bathroom and I asked for help to get him to the bathroom. However, he was too weak even with three people to help him transferring onto the toilet and back to the wheelchair. Ever since then, I offered the bedpan instead because I could not risk him falling even in the presence of three CNAs. I had another patient who refused to let me provide care for her after repeatedly asking her. I reported to the nurse and the nurse was aware and came in to talk to the patient and helped me out to with some tasks. Most of the time, I was able to work by myself using the lifts and assessing the circumstances. Each situation varies and you ALWAYS need to assess. Your facility needs to train you properly regarding types of assists, types of lifts, and resources. If the facility you are working at does not have the right resources, do look for another facility unless the facility is the closer one to home or is the only one in your community. As a CNA, you should focus on your tasks and duties for the day. Ask for help when needed and help out when you can. If something suddenly happens such as an emergency or whatever, let the nurse know or the supervisor know. Always let them know if you cannot complete something due to problems unexpectedly happen. The nurse has power and can write you up if they think you are showing them insubordination. At the end of the day, YOU are responsible for your certification not the nurse.
  5. aethereality

    One Page Resume?

    First, I am a CNA and I cannot speak for RN resume. I am a new CNA and new to healthcare field so I make my resume one page. I was able to get several interviews at different hospitals. I ended up getting more offers than expected.
  6. aethereality

    Multiple job offers & new to healthcare

    I also recommend you looking at all the details of the employment offers. Is there a difference in pay? Full-time or part-time? # of hours worked in a day? Schedule? Are there any good benefits among the three offers? Is it at-will employment or contract or unionized position? Other perks? Combining with the advice from @Hoosier_RN, MSN, I'm sure you will be able to choose the better offer for you.
  7. aethereality

    Should I retake Anatomy and Physiology 1?

    From my understanding, most schools may average the grade even if you retake the class. I do recommend you retaking the class if possible especially at another school. Work to earn an A so even if they average the C+ and A, it will be a B or B-. Community colleges may not allow you to retake that same course because they see your grade as passing. Lastly, each nursing program requirements differ so do try to look for a school that does allow acceptance of prerequisite retakes.
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