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morbidlycurious

morbidlycurious

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  1. morbidlycurious

    Stethoscope

    I have not decided yet either, but I will point out that the Classic III comes with a 5 year warranty, where the Cardio has a 7 year warranty. If you decide on the Cardio, you may want to spend the extra couple of bucks to buy it from a place that will engrave it with your name. There's a ton of these places online ( mystethoscope.com allheart.com ect) I've seen it mentioned on several different sites that it does not void the warranty. Those places tend to be a little more expensive than amazon, but a lot of them have a better selection. If not, the basic black Classic III is on sale for only 66 bucks on amazon right now. Maybe you can pick that up AND some sweet nursing shoes
  2. morbidlycurious

    Would repeating a prerequisite hurt my chance of getting in?

    I wouldn't take general chemistry unless 1. you want to go to a school that will only accept that particular chemistry class, or 2. you have biology or chemistry as a back up major. That being said, if you decide to take another Chemistry class, it will only hurt your chances IF you do not do well the second time around. I personally would focus on my other prerequisites instead, but if you feel that taking another chemistry class would help round out your education a little more, then I would lean towards Chemistry for Allied health. I've taken both Gen Chem 1&2, and then Chemistry for Allied health at a later date as a "refresher," and that allied health class covered all the topics from Gen Chem 1&2 PLUS some organic chemistry. The good thing was that it focused on topics that actually add to your nursing education - proteins/fats/carbs, pH, partial pressures of gases ect. If you've already taken Anatomy though, chances are that you already have been exposed to all this stuff. Good luck in whatever you decide to do!
  3. morbidlycurious

    Pre nursing student

    You'll find out at orientation. It's too hard to say otherwise without knowing what the program is. I know that some schools will start you in a "skills lab" first, where you learn the basics before going to "real" clinicals. Also don't buy scrubs until you find out about this because many schools have their own uniform or strict dress code. Good luck!
  4. morbidlycurious

    Alternate List

    I would apply to the program that's close to you. You never know what kind of financial package they might offer you. Also, with your pre-requisites out of the way, you may be paying less than 8k a semester if you end up less than full time anyway. I'm also a big proponent of attending a school that it closer because a lot of nursing schools are really strict with attendance, and depending where you live that 1hr in each direction could wind up being a lot longer when you add in inclement weather and traffic accidents. That's time that you could be studying, sleeping, ect. I would still apply to the other schools, but cover your butt and keep your options open
  5. morbidlycurious

    Really need help

    Fastest path to an RN license is an associates degree (think community college; also cheap) or diploma program (around 20 months), although I would only recommend one of those if it is offered at a hospital. Beware of any "tech" school, or at least look at their google reviews! You can skip the associate's degree (typically two year) and go straight for a bachelor's and get your RN license that way. Any of these programs will prepare you to take the N-CLEX. Search for programs near you, take a look at their pre-requisites as they might not be the same as your current school, and find out if you need to take any entrance tests (such as the TEAS). All of the school's will have different due dates as well, but do your research as some schools will take in students several times a year and you may be able to start sooner. I am a first generation college student as well (my parents didn't even graduate high school!) and I wish I had reached out for help earlier on. I am still attempting to navigate my way through!!
  6. morbidlycurious

    Pre-Nursing!!!

    Check out the professors from your school who teach the classes on ratemyprofessor. Every school is different, but you should be able to get a good idea of how hard the class is by what previous students say. I wish the schools around here allowed general students to take patho or pharm. Here, you have to be in the nursing program first, so you're pretty much forced to take everything together.
  7. morbidlycurious

    Microbiology this summer. Am I crazy?

    I found microbiology to be a lot of memorization while A&P2 was more big concepts. LOTS of flashcards for micro, and flow charts for A&P2. I would take them together in the fall and nothing else. At least that way you'll have the extra time to let the ideas soak in, especially for A&P2. It's totally do-able. I'd get your easy classes out of the way over the summer so that you can focus on your hard sciences.
  8. morbidlycurious

    White Nursing Student Shoes

    I've checked the uniform stores near me, and none carry white. The sales associate told me that this is because only nursing students buy white super helpful! You can check out any uniform stores near you just to see the fit of different brands. I'd buy 'em cheaper offline once you know what you're looking for. I did try the danskos just see.. and it felt like i was standing on two bricks. At this point, leather sneakers are sounding pretty good for me, but maybe you'll have better luck!
  9. morbidlycurious

    Nursing Student dilemma

    I believe that most schools want transcripts from all institutions attended. Even if you withdraw. I think that a withdraw of courses would look better than an F, but you are most likely going to have to be open about this either way. If you withdraw, it won't hurt your GPA. Plus anywhere else that you apply will see that the problem was at this school, and that you did well elsewhere. It seems that some schools are very accepting of situations like this, but it may depend on how hard it is to get into RN/LPN programs near you. If you think that you want to withdraw, maybe you can stick it out for a few weeks and learn what you can/see how it goes. May as well pick up a few things if you're going to receive a "W" grade anyway. And the tuition is already paid. Maybe you'll even decide to stay, or earn a good grade in some classes that can be transferred to another school. Food for thought
  10. morbidlycurious

    I have DUIs on my past record.

    Dang. I am in near the same position, so my two cents is limited to my experience. What I did was first was checked with my state board of nursing, to see if my convictions will prohibit me from getting a license. Next, I talked to the nursing schools near me to see what their individual policies are. I live smack dab in the middle of a bunch of nursing schools and they all have different policies -- ranging from not being able to apply with ANY convictions, to needing to complete probation first, to a school that doesn't even want to know unless it's a felony. At this point, I've found schools willing to take me if I can get cleared for the individual clinical sites -- can't complete any programs without clinical experiences. Be prepared to explain your convictions. And if you do decide to persue nursing, remember that you're already starting at a disadvantage. You'll want to make yourself look amazing in every other way; high marks on perquisites, volunteer or cna experience. Anything to give you an edge will help. Wish me luck and I will do the same for you!!
  11. morbidlycurious

    Nail Manicures

    Right now I'm rocking natural nails, but when I wear gel polish, I have them on the short side in a neutral color. I can usually get away with almost 4 weeks, with using hand lotion regularly. Brighter colors will make new nail growth stand out.
  12. morbidlycurious

    ATI Critical Thinking Exam

    Pretty much. My test only had two hospital related questions - something like "an older gentleman repeated reports having severe pain." Do you : A. Assume he is just complaining. B. Ignore him and move on. C. Listen to his concerns. D. Restock supplies. You can search online for "critical thinking tests" and find some with questions like "if all cats are wolves, and some wolves are aardvarks, then all aardvarks must be cats." I had a TON of those on mine. There was a bunch of questions about evaluating made up newspaper articles too. Where the available answers are "this statement must be true." "This statement must not be true." "This statement may be true." or "This statement may be false." Just use your time wisely and do your best. I was given 20 minutes to take mine, but I was worried that I would run out of time without answering all of the questions. Some questions will take longer than others. Some schools allow you to retake it too after a certain amount of time has elapsed. I'd think that with you already having completed some nursing courses, you should be fine.
  13. morbidlycurious

    Took a class I didnt need.. frustrated

    All of the schools around here require Developmental psych as well, as either a prerequisite or as part of a nursing bachelor's. I actually just retook it as a refresher and because the programs around here like to see more "current" coursework. At least now you know that your butt will be covered!!
  14. morbidlycurious

    "Certified court papers"

    Thank you for the information!! The only thing that I can find for my state (Pennsylvania), is that they contact applicants if additional information is needed after the BON receives the State police record's check. The used to have more information on their website, but it has been taken down, so I am not sure if they still do things the same way.
  15. morbidlycurious

    Anatomy and Physiology II

    Was this an advanced placement style class, or were you dual enrollment with a college at the time? It's been a while since I've been in high school, but the anatomy class that I took in high school was nothing like the one that I took in college. Plus, the concepts build on each other, so you may be better off with this fresh in your mind. Maybe you can check out the book that you would be using at your campus bookstore, and flip through and see if you remember anything.
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