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obnurse406

obnurse406

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  1. I've always known I have wanted to pursue an advanced nursing degree, and I feel like the time is right in my life to start. I have 6 years experience as a labor and delivery nurse. I always thought I wanted to pursue a nurse practitioner career. I am interested in the advanced practice portion, especially in the area of women's health, and have considered maybe a women's health nurse practitioner track. One of the biggest pros of this career is the schedule; I would want to work in a clinic setting, where I wouldn't have to work as many nights/weekends/holidays. However, I LOVE labor and delivery and am not sure I want to give that up for a clinic career. I know I would still be challenged daily and would learn a great deal, but I really enjoy caring for women during labor and birth. I didn't think I wanted to look into a career as a nurse-midwife, but I'm starting to consider it now. The major drawbacks are the call and I have heard CNMs have to carry major liability insurance, and there's of course a higher likelihood of being involved in litigation at some point (not unlike being a labor nurse). But the pros would be the ability to continue to do what I love, just at a different level. I'm leaning at this point towards a nurse-midwide/women's health nurse practitioner dual focus program. I would love any insight from those who are in either field; what helped you decide on your chosen career path? Any advice is much appreciated!
  2. I've always known I have wanted to pursue an advanced nursing degree, and I feel like the time is right in my life to start. I have 6 years experience as a labor and delivery nurse. I always thought I wanted to pursue a nurse practitioner career. I am interested in the advanced practice portion, especially in the area of women's health, and have considered maybe a women's health nurse practitioner track. One of the biggest pros of this career is the schedule; I would want to work in a clinic setting, where I wouldn't have to work as many nights/weekends/holidays. However, I LOVE labor and delivery and am not sure I want to give that up for a clinic career. I know I would still be challenged daily and would learn a great deal, but I really enjoy caring for women during labor and birth. I didn't think I wanted to look into a career as a nurse-midwife, but I'm starting to consider it now. The major drawbacks are the call and I have heard CNMs have to carry major liability insurance, and there's of course a higher likelihood of being involved in litigation at some point (not unlike being a labor nurse). But the pros would be the ability to continue to do what I love, just at a different level. I'm leaning at this point towards a nurse-midwide/women's health nurse practitioner dual focus program. I would love any insight from those who are in either field; what helped you decide on your chosen career path? Any advice is much appreciated!
  3. A little background about me: I am a nurse with 5 years of experience on an LDRP unit that does about 1500 deliveries per year. I have also been a member of my hospital's perinatal flight team for the last 2 years, transporting high-risk patients from surrounding areas. I have NCC certifications in Inpatient Obstetrics and Electronic Fetal Monitoring. I have frequently considered joining the military, and have finally decided now is the time to pursue it. I am 27 years old, single, and in decent physical shape. Here's where things get interesting: I had a large meningioma, which caused permanent anosmia (I don't have a sense of smell) and I had a craniotomy in 2017. My finances weren't the best after my surgery and everything and my credit score isn't the best. I know this is something they consider when commissioning. I would love input from those with experience joining the military as a nurse! I would be interested to know if you have any idea if I even have a shot at joining, considering my medical and financial history. My recruiter doesn't seem too concerned, but I still am very worried I'm going to get denied, which would be devastating. I also want to know how difficult /competitive the process is: it seems pretty straightforward, but I keep reading about people who apply multiple times for years before getting in. On that note; if I'm told no, can I keep trying? At this time my recruiter tells me there are 4 slots available for OB nurses, but 52 for clinical nurses. He gave me the option of trying to join as a clinical nurse to improve my chances of getting in. My ultimate goal is to go back to school for my FNP, so I would be okay with changing specialties, even though I love labor and delivery! I would love to hear other people's experiences with Air Force nursing in general as well, as far as if you like it, all the pros and cons, if I can expect to be deployed often, what bases are good/bad, etc! Thanks in advance and thanks for reading this novel!
  4. obnurse406

    NP with anosmia

    Haha true @dizzyjon, however sometimes the only symptom of a pelvic problem can be an unusual odor...
  5. obnurse406

    NP with anosmia

    Thank you! I really appreciate your input and am happy to hear that.
  6. obnurse406

    NP with anosmia

    Hey everyone, A little backstory: I am a labor and delivery RN/perinatal flight nurse. I have considered going back to school eventually to pursue a career as a women's health nurse practitioner. I've been thinking about doing so sometime in the next few years, but one thing has been holding me back. About a year ago, I lost my sense of smell. I finally found out that it was due to a large olfactory groove meningioma, which was successfully removed in January this year but the tumor had completely destroyed my olfactory nerves, so I have permanent anosmia. My question is, do you think I can/should still pursue a career as an NP if I have no sense of smell? I know your sense of smell is an important part of your assessment, although I've never missed being able to smell while working at the bedside Thanks in advance for any input, opinions, and advice!
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