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Emm_RN

Emm_RN

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  1. Emm_RN

    Floor Nurse Thinking about Home Health

    Hi! I work full time in home health, I am not sure what the pay rate would look like for PRN work but certain agencies pay per visit and others are salaried. With bigger companies it is usually a salary. I love the independence and flexibility. It is really nice arranging your day, and sometimes the patients need specific times for certain things but for the most part the timing is totally up to you. I like that I can plan my visits around my appointments. If i want to take a lunch break I can, and if I don't want to, then I don't. I only had one scary situation where a patient's son was getting released from prison and coming to stay with her as he had tried to shoot her the last time he came home and she had guns in the house. I just called one of our security guards and he went with me for the few days I was there. The only thing I don't like is sometimes the case managing. We usually see 6-7 patients per day which is manageable, but with your personal caseload of patients it can be stressful following up with things on the days you are not seeing them. Hope this helps! All in all, it is the best job I've had because we truly get a lot of respect from our patients and managers!
  2. Emm_RN

    Severe Depression/Anxiety

    I felt EXACTLY like this for the 3 years I worked in the hospital. I started working as a visiting nurse, it has truly saved me. I feel so much better, all the time. If you are anything like me, get out of the hospital. That's all it took for me to have a better outlook on life.
  3. Emm_RN

    EKU info please?

    Hi all, I have recently applied for EKU's PMHNP program (master's). The only things that need submitted still are my transcripts, which I have sent out for. My undergrad GPA was a 3.05, but I think that my goal statement was solid and my references are as well. How long after everything is submitted does it take to hear back about acceptance? Is it hard to get into this program? How competitive is it? For anybody who has gone through or is currently in the program: do you feel that you are well prepared for your future as a PMHNP? What do they look at most heavily for acceptance? Thank you for any information!
  4. Emm_RN

    Upcoming HH interview!

    Thank you both for responding! It helps to hear from fellow nurses that my experience is adequate for a career in home health. I have a list of questions ready about mileage, distance, on call etc.. now let's hope I land the job!
  5. Emm_RN

    Upcoming HH interview!

    Hi all! I have my BSN and I have a history of working 1 year med/surg and 2 years of NICU/PICU. I am also certified in phlebotomy. I have an interview in a few days for a home health company that is run by the company I am currently employed by (UPMC). I have always been interested in home health and have read all about it. One thing I am wondering, worrying about my possible new career route, is if I have enough experience. I have read that generally, 1-2 years of med/surg is adequate. More of my experience is in ICU, but I do have that one year of M/S. I feel very confident with blood draws, I LOVE wound care and have done plenty of that in the PICU, and I am comfortable with ventilators. I feel that the ICU truly helped me develop my assessment skills, and I love patient teaching. Is 3 years of total experience with only 1 in M/S enough to be good at HH? I love learning and have been reading up and reviewing my M/S topics, but I'm just worried that I won't have the experience to back me up. Also, what is the orientation period generally like? I will obviously have a list of questions for my interviewer but I'm just hoping for some more info from some HH nurses. Thank you for reading!
  6. Emm_RN

    In need of a confidence boost!

    Thank you all for your advice! It is hard to learn sometimes and I'm already nervous enough to take care of these kiddos! I have a meeting coming up with my educator and unit director so I'll bring up the topic then. I appreciate all of your responses!
  7. Emm_RN

    In need of a confidence boost!

    Hi all, Background: I did adult med-surg for one year (mostly ortho). Jumped to NICU where I spent a little over a year, now am in my third month of PICU. I have two preceptors, one who has been there for going on seven years, is a great nurse, but very particular about little things (like how the IV pumps are facing and where things are laid out on the unicell). I'd been told that she was tough and hard to work with, but I've found we actually get along decently well. She told me up front that she would let me know if I'm not doing well or not progressing as I should be, and she so far has said that I'm doing well and adjusting well, that she thinks I just need to get comfortable with pediatric diagnoses. She mostly lets me do my own thing unless it's something I haven't seen or done before, then she will explain it and have me do it and she watches. My other preceptor, well, has only been there about 13 months and I'm her first orientee. I'm with her less than half of the time I'm on orientation, but she is difficult to work with. The communication...is pretty awful. For example, one night we were getting ready to take a patient to MRI. The patient was still awake and my preceptor told me to draw up a dose of rocuronium because the fellow wanted her to have some, to which I asked if she also wanted fentanyl prior to the roc because this patient was still awake. She raised her voice and said "Just draw up the roc." I drew up the roc, brought it over to the bed and had her double check it. She then says "What are you doing. I already drew up the roc. But okay just give it." Just to clarify (because I was being given conflicting information) I asked "Okay, so they want the roc now, correct?" and she goes "Okay, no, don't give it. She's still awake just WAIT." At this point I was so frustrated and annoyed that I just stepped back and got her transport monitor hooked up. The fellow comes in and asks if we gave the roc, and my preceptor asks me "Well did you give it or not?" and I said I was waiting to give it, like she told me to. And she goes "Oh my god Okay I'll just give it since you forgot to." I was SO CONFUSED. Even some of the nurses in the room helping told her afterwards that she wasn't making any sense. Every shift that I've been with her, she has been doing these kinds of things and making me feel like an idiot. When I leave my shifts with my night shift preceptor, I feel like an absolute idiot, and I feel like a new grad again. I'm trying to tell myself it's not me, but it's really not making my transition any easier. My question is, does it seem like maybe they gave her an orientee prematurely and she wasn't ready for one? And should I go to my educator about it? I'm only with her for two more weeks then I'm with my main preceptor for the last 5 weeks, but I am having trouble dealing with these issues every time I work with her.
  8. Emm_RN

    NICU to PICU

    Thanks for the advice guys! It all helps! I think part of the reason I'm going there is because of the huge differences, so I think the transition will be exciting! I'm totally open to whole new ways of doing things.
  9. Emm_RN

    NICU to PICU

    Hi all, I'm officially starting in the PICU next week after almost a year and a half in NICU. Same hospital, so I'm not nervous about getting to know where I'm going, but I am nervous that my preceptor will expect more out of me coming from NICU but the two are so different! I'm reading up on peds critical care. Any advice for my transition?! Thanks!
  10. Emm_RN

    Getting attitude about transferring to PICU!

    Thank you! I'm sure it'll be a ton of new information but I am studying up and getting prepared.
  11. Emm_RN

    Is NICU for me?

    I am currently a NICU nurse although I'll be transferring to the PICU very soon. I can tell you that it is a nice mix. My NICU is a level 4 and we see the sickest babies who require ECMO, CRRT, cardiac drips, surgeries, etc. but we also see fairly healthy preems or full term babies who have a feeding intolerance and just need a few weeks to work on feeding/growing and may only have a feeding tube. It is nice because you may have a challenging day with a very sick kiddo and you may be taking them to the OR, they may code, etc, and then the next day you may have a few kids working on feeding and sleep in between care times. The change-up is nice and refreshing and you don't get burnt out very quickly as the acuity ranges so dramatically. Good luck with whatever you decide to do!
  12. Emm_RN

    Getting attitude about transferring to PICU!

    Thank you for replying! I'll just turn my heads to the naysayers and hope that they're wrong! I'm glad you found happiness in your role :)
  13. Emm_RN

    Getting attitude about transferring to PICU!

    I shadowed after the interview and I found it exciting and very interesting. I loved it! I know that I won't truly understand all that goes on until I'm on orientation, but I am a bit tired of the general routine in the NICU. The problem becomes that we get used to our 9-12-3-6 care times and if anything goes on in between these hours people get so thrown off sometimes, and I do not want to get like that. I love keeping busy and doing new things all the time. I feel that I am not using enough skills right now in the NICU. Thank you for your input! Love hearing from someone who's been to both places. It is nice to hear some positive feedback on this decision!
  14. Emm_RN

    Getting attitude about transferring to PICU!

    I love this because I feel that sometimes the NICU emphasizes patient development so heavily that we forget about the imminent safety. For example, we focus so much on attempting to do as much kangaroo care as possible with our tiny intubated preemies that we have an increase in accidental extubations. I feel strongly that immediate safety and security of an artificial airway is more important at that time than doing kangaroo care every day! Thank you for your input, I'm happy to hear from a person who has made the jump that I'm about to make. I love learning and I'm afraid that I'll get bored without experiencing all of these different age groups and different disorders.
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