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NMRN2017

NMRN2017

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  1. NMRN2017

    Frequent dressing change and use of tape

    Tape is often a necessary evil. If skin is intact, not fragile and no allergies to tape are seen, then yes, minimal tape is often necessary. Just use caution when removing it so as not to damage skin. Good luck!
  2. NMRN2017

    Stage II Pressure Ulcer Coccyx on Bed-Bound Patient

    I agree, it sounds like it is staying too wet. Is he on a regular mattress? An air type matees may help relieve pressure if he won't remain off of the back. Good luck!
  3. NMRN2017

    Wound treatment options

    I'm looking for some input. I work at a hospital on the MedSurge unit and currently what is available for wound treatment or pressure ulcer prevention is a product called Mepilex. It is used for EVERYTHING from pressure ulcers to skin tears! I kind of hate it!! Lol. I recently found steri-strips, so have been trying to change the thinking on skin tear treatments, but would like input on other wound treatment options to suggest/present. Thank you for any input!! Wishing a safe, blessed day to all! Debbie, RN
  4. NMRN2017

    Thinking about correctional nursing

    I worked in correctional nursing for 3 years, majority of the time at an all men's prison, although I did a few shifts at a Women's prison as well. In a lot of ways it was like "nursing in a bar". LOL Seriously, though. I was fortunate enough to have a wonderful MD and NP working there and their knowledge (that they freely shared) taught me a lot. The diversity you can come across in prison nursing was surprising to me. You have this captive patient group (no pun intended there), who are dependent on you for ALL medical needs, so you see everything from routine vaccinations (flu, tetanus, Hep A, B etc) to complex treatment for liver failure, AV malformations, diabetes, wounds. You name it. The men were mostly all very respectful to the medical staff (except a few hateful individuals who treated the inmates bad -- they got disrespected in return). It is of course, always a risk. Depending on the facility you work at, there are people there who have nothing to loose (i.e.; already doing a life sentence), and there are irrational or mentally disturbed individuals as well. So taking that into consideration is a must. But overall I would recommend the experience to anyone. I learned a lot, and it is definitely an underserved population!! Good luck, and congrats on your eminent graduation!!!
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