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Problem With A Math Question!

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I need a little help with this question.

13. Order: 500 mL D5NS to run at 50 mL/hr

How many hours will this IV run?

Drop factor 15 gtt/mL

Flow rate: _____ gtt/min

My answers where that the IV will run for 10 hrs and for flow rate I got 12.5 gtt/min which I rounded up to 13 gtt/min.

According to the answer key it will run for 10 hrs but it says that the flow rate should be 12 gtt/min. I always thought that if there was a 5 or higher to the right of the decimal that you rounded up. What do you really do in this circumstance?

EricJRN, MSN, RN

Specializes in NICU. Has 15 years experience.

For the purposes of your assignment, I would agree with you. In the real world, we can put the fluids on a pump for exactly 12.5 gtts/min.

Daytonite, BSN, RN

Specializes in med/surg, telemetry, IV therapy, mgmt. Has 40 years experience.

In the old days before every IV was put on a pump, I would have titrated the IV to drip at 13 drops a minute. Yes, you do round up when you have a decimal of .5 or above. This is probably a typo in your book.

Eric...what brand of IV pump allows to you set a drip rate at 12.5gtts/min.? Is this something used in the critical care units exclusively?

Thanks guys! That's what I remember learning back in first semester. We were taught to figure it out as if there wasn't a pump and I have to say that all of the IV pumps that I've used in clinicals have all been set to ml/hr. I've never seen them use gtt/min using a pump.

I was reviewing for this semester and this really through me off. I confuse easily when it comes to math!:uhoh21:

EricJRN, MSN, RN

Specializes in NICU. Has 15 years experience.

I know that several models of the Alaris System by Cardinal Health are in wide usage and they allow decimals, but in this case it wouldn't actually be necessary since you could enter 50 mL/hr and be fine.

I know that several models of the Alaris System by Cardinal Health are in wide usage and they allow decimals, but in this case it wouldn't actually be necessary since you could enter 50 mL/hr and be fine.

That's what I figured, but you know test questions!

Daytonite, BSN, RN

Specializes in med/surg, telemetry, IV therapy, mgmt. Has 40 years experience.

I know that several models of the Alaris System by Cardinal Health are in wide usage and they allow decimals, but in this case it wouldn't actually be necessary since you could enter 50 mL/hr and be fine.
Thanks, Eric. I haven't been working in the acute hospital for a couple of years, so I wasn't aware of this. I have no doubt some companies would come up with the technology sooner or later. Where were they back in the 70's? Sigh.
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