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Presentation of a problem/resolution to management of other units

Nurses   (157 Views | 6 Replies)
by Mrl4963 Mrl4963 (New) New Nurse

Mrl4963 specializes in Icu.

22 Profile Views; 3 Posts

I work in a hospital that is working towards obtaining magnet status and is starting up nursing councils as well as unit based councils.  I am a member of my unit based council and am responsible for presenting a document to other unit managers regarding ICU nurses being floated to other units and being treated poorly by staff in those units.  I have a list of recommendations to improve the experience of our nurses when being floated yet still providing relief to nurses of those units as well as increasing patient safety.  
 

The problem is that I do not know how to structure this document in a professional manner.  I’d like for it to be straight forward, easy to see what the problem is, how we can change it and why.  Are there any of you who have experience in a unit based council who has ideas on how I should present this?   Being a new council, no one in my group has experience in this role.  

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Cyra-Lea Drummond specializes in Cardiac health.

1 Article; 8 Posts; 221 Profile Views

I would be happy to help you. I was head of my unit-based shared governance council as an ICU nurse. Now, I work as a freelance writer. You may feel free to message me directly with any questions.

I will mention one specific anecdote that I found helpful one time when I was floated from ICU to a step-down unit. The charge nurse gave me a laminated index card with "need to know" information for the unit - codes to the break and supply rooms is what I mostly remember. I was also given a small gift bag as a thank you for helping out on the unit that day. I think it had a few pieces of candy and a gift card to the hospital cafeteria. Nothing big, but the gesture went a long way in making me feel appreciated.

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Jedrnurse has 25 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in school nurse.

1,543 Posts; 14,310 Profile Views

2 hours ago, Cyra-Lea Drummond said:

I will mention one specific anecdote that I found helpful one time when I was floated from ICU to a step-down unit. The charge nurse gave me a laminated index card with "need to know" information for the unit - codes to the break and supply rooms is what I mostly remember. I was also given a small gift bag as a thank you for helping out on the unit that day. I think it had a few pieces of candy and a gift card to the hospital cafeteria. Nothing big, but the gesture went a long way in making me feel appreciated.

What a welcome change to the many various float-horror stories that I've heard over the years...

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nursej22 has 30 years experience as a MSN, RN and specializes in med/surg,CV.

1 Follower; 1,357 Posts; 34,539 Profile Views

I suggest an SBAR format because many people in acute care are familiar with it. 

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Mrl4963 specializes in Icu.

3 Posts; 22 Profile Views

Thanks for the replies.  Yes, the float stories have been terrible.  I’m sure it happens in a lot of places, but icu nurses are viewed as able to work anywhere and we get abused.  They will ask nurses to work extra days to fill the needs of icu and then pull icu nurses to other units on the same shift a nurse was asked to work extra.  We have been pulled to another unit for their nurses to discharge patients then go home early.  They will give icu nurses the sickest patients, give them more patients than their own nurses have, and will give them all of their patients on contact precautions.  We have lost several good nurses over it.  
 

suggesting little orientation packets for floated nurses, a resource nurse (charge free  or discharge coordinator) to be accessible to floated nurses, restrictions on the number of patients, number of contact or incontinent patients, and requesting units to own their complex patients and and complex situations to promote consistency and best possible patient outcomes are among some of the things we are working to achieve 

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12 Followers; 3,984 Posts; 30,141 Profile Views

My tip would be to phrase everything as positively as possible and to avoid the temptation to convey the problem by rattling off or listing all the grievances. Remember the other side of it (keep it in the back of your mind): Distasteful as these grievances may be, they get off the ground because of other problems. The nurses who aren't treating others well are quite likely to not have been being treated well themselves. I'm not excusing them, I'm just saying it all isn't as simple as it seems.

I say your presentation should be a picture of what the future could/should look like as far as this topic is concerned. What do we want to strive for in welcoming others to our unit, etc., etc.

ETA: In other words, if the home-unit nurses have been feeling burdened, worn out and overworked, the worst possible thing is to inadvertently imply that every bad experience float nurses have had is because of them. In reality it just isn't.

If you want to make progress EVERYBODY probably needs to be empowered and built up.

Edited by JKL33

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Mrl4963 specializes in Icu.

3 Posts; 22 Profile Views

Point well taken.  Thank you for the feedback 

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