HELP! ADN or private school BSN?

  1. Hi everyone!
    Long story short, I am a pre-nursing student finishing up her pre-reqs. I am more of a traditional student, but it has taken me a long time to get to the point of actually applying to nursing schools. Because of that, if I were to start a program this fall, I would graduate after six years in school. I know that isn't a big deal to some people, but I am nervous about the possibility of my financial aid running out because I've read after six years in school, FAFSA stops giving you loans.

    I am stuck between two schools. A private BSN program that would start this Fall (Fall 2018) and finish in Spring 2020. That would put me right at six years for a Bachelor's degree. I am nervous about this option because the school is incredibly expensive, but it is a BSN program and I have only heard great things about it. Students do say there are scholarship opportunities, etc.

    My other option is at a Community College. It is an ADN program that I would not be able to begin until Fall of 2019 (you have to be completed with your pre-reqs before you can apply), and I would graduate Fall 2020. The perks of this program is that it would be only a fraction of the cost of the BSN, but I would only have my ADN and I have heard negative experiences of people with ADN's not being able to find a job. Plus, I think my financial aid would run out before I finished school. I also would plan to do a RN-BSN bridge option would just be another round of school (and student loans) tacked on.

    I guess what my question is, in your experience, which is the better option? Should I start the BSN program with the perks of a great, respectable program and have my BSN and have a lot of student debt afterwards, or should I wait another year for the ADN program (that I may not even be accepted to) and have the harsh reality of not being able to find a job.

    I appreciate everyone's help and advice!

    *also, I would apply to a public BSN program, but they are extremely competitive around my area and my GPA does not compete. The BSN program I am applying to looks at you holistically, not just by your GPA and the ADN program is based on a point system and only cares about your pre-reqs which I have done well in so far.*
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    About HopefullyFutureRN

    Joined: Sep '17; Posts: 8; Likes: 4
    from GA , US

    4 Comments

  3. by   nursel56
    Hi HopefullyfutureRN!

    My opinion (recognizing that most likely others will have different ideas)

    For maximum flexibility, marketability, and upward mobility in the nursing world, a BSN is almost mandatory. I say "almost" because depending on where you plan to work, doors may still be open for ADNs in every aspect I mentioned.

    Since it seems you've decided your goal definitely is nursing school, it makes sense to get the BSN sooner rather than later. This may also alleviate your fears of becoming a perpetual student and running out of options regarding financial aid.

    As I see it, the major drawback of the private school program is the cost, which obviously is a major consideration.

    However, if you still have the ability to use scholarships and whatever other financial aid is available to you, if it were me, I would opt for the BSN program.

    Hopefully others will chime in as well.

    Best wishes to you!
  4. by   HopefullyFutureRN
    Quote from nursel56
    Hi HopefullyfutureRN!

    My opinion (recognizing that most likely others will have different ideas)

    For maximum flexibility, marketability, and upward mobility in the nursing world, a BSN is almost mandatory. I say "almost" because depending on where you plan to work, doors may still be open for ADNs in every aspect I mentioned.

    Since it seems you've decided your goal definitely is nursing school, it makes sense to get the BSN sooner rather than later. This may also alleviate your fears of becoming a perpetual student and running out of options regarding financial aid.

    As I see it, the major drawback of the private school program is the cost, which obviously is a major consideration.

    However, if you still have the ability to use scholarships and whatever other financial aid is available to you, if it were me, I would opt for the BSN program.

    Hopefully others will chime in as well.

    Best wishes to you!
    Thank you so much for your response and your advice!

    I should add that I really WANT to go to the BSN program, I am just trying to justify the cost. I think at this point, time is now a big factor in getting my degree so it may be worth the extra cost to finish my degree sooner rather than later. Plus, if I did the ADN program, all of the credits I have already accrued during my first three years of college would basically be a waste. Where as with the BSN, the classes I have taken over the years do fill most of the pre-requisites and I wouldn't feel like three years of college went to complete waste.

    On the other hand, I have not been accepted into either program, yet. It is completely possible that I will be denied from the BSN program, and God will have given me my answer of which route to take. Part of me hopes this happens so I don't get myself in over my head in debt.

    Thanks again!
  5. by   hurricanekat
    Ok - so this is a multi-fold process. Please see this link for more details (if you haven't already). Subsidized and Unsubsidized Loans | Federal Student Aid

    1) its a 150% of time thing. If your program is 4 years - then you get 6 years. If your program is 2 years then you get 3 years.
    2) its also a total money thing. When you get to $57,500 as an independent student - you are capped out until you either - get personal loans or pay that amount down.

    I am currently in this situation because I just finished my undergrad and then changed my mind. I don't have enough $$ left to go where I really want to go.

    I'd start checking into what you have available now to make sure you have available what you need. Financial aid at a school will be able to explain this to you.
    Good Luck!!
  6. by   RainbowSprinkles
    Apply to both, whomever takes you..go. Either options could be viable for you. Nursing is a tricky field to get into, I wouldn't put all my eggs in one basket. I made that mistake before, only applied to absn programs and I got rejected to all. Being that most schools have a particular timeframe to put in application if you got rejected, you would possibly be waiting another 6 months to a year to apply again. Apply to both, if you got accept to both..then weigh your options. Where you reside can play a huge factor on the rn market (adn vs bsn). However, I would not let that be a determining factor if you got an opportunity to get into a program. Most rn-bsn bridge programs are about a yr, if you have a significant amount of college credits already.

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