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Pay renegotiation ideas needed

Nurses   (789 Views 11 Comments)
by xanderfan xanderfan (Member) Member

1,165 Profile Views; 36 Posts

Hi everyone. Not sure if this is the place to ask information about this but not sure what to do and would love some ideas from my more experienced peers and this is the only platform that i know.

I have a full time job that i love. No issues with them so far. I wanted to have a part-time so that I can save some more money (sorely needed). Now during the application process I asked for a certain amount of money per hr. I low-balled it to be honest. Now my issue is after applying spoke to a friend that worked there and it seems that I severely low balled it. They pay is at least 4 more dollars extra than what I asked for. Now I reached out to the Director and asked what the pay was without trying to seem as if I was changing my mind and she didn't reply but they already sent me paperwork to sign with the pay that I asked for. Now what do I do?

My options are limited since I do want the job, not because my eye is set on it but because it is a big company and opportunities to grow are vast and I can transition to another one if I should move somewhere else. Also I'm of the belief that you shouldn't close door on opportunities. But it sucks major that I'll be working for a lot less than the nurses under me will make, it's a supervisor position, but this is what I asked for so I should just suck it up. But now that I know I don't think I'll be able to take it.

Now the core question. I want to ask for another rate closer to what I was told was the standard, which i've confirmed. (wish I spoke to those colleagues before i applied). Anyway what's the politically correct way to go about this? I don't want to come across ungrateful or rude. I also don't want to close my opportunities with this company. Please give me thoughts (if you were patient enough to read through this essay).

Sammie

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Been there,done that has 33 years experience as a ASN, RN.

4 Followers; 6,211 Posts; 69,389 Profile Views

Don't sign the agreement. Call HR, inform them you want to negotiate. Ask for what you think you are worth, all they can do is say no.

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36 Posts; 1,165 Profile Views

Don't sign the agreement. Call HR, inform them you want to negotiate. Ask for what you think you are worth, all they can do is say no.

Thanks you are right. I was thinking along those lines but I was worried I would sound greedy but it's only fair if they are able to pay more. It's not like I'm going to be unreasonable just in par with what others are getting. I'm going to tell them that the pay is not enough and that I have a better offer. Would that be better rather than outright confrontation with HR?

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3,726 Posts; 23,724 Profile Views

You could say you've done additional research and found the local rates are significantly higher than you are being offered and originally said would be satisfactory. You want the opportunity and to learn and grow in this position with commensurate pay and that you need to revisit the wage negotiation

If they question why the delay in determining competitive rates, you could tell them that you've since learned how to perform better search using the best variables and criteria.

If you're not asking for above and beyond the current rates, they may be disappointed if not irritated. Just be sure to consider which positions you're making comparions, some clinical staff do make more than entry level mgmt.

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Davey Do has 35 years experience and specializes in Psych, CD, HH, Admin, LTC, OR, ER, Med Surge.

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Back in '02, I had accepted position as a Nursing Supervisor with a salary when I found out that my portion of health insurance premiums were quite a bit higher than with my previous job. I don't remember the exact amount- it may have been $2000. Maybe $4000, but I contacted the administrator, told her I didn't realize my premiums would be as high as they were, and requested the two or four thousand/year a pay raise. The administrator okayed it with HR.

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Been there,done that has 33 years experience as a ASN, RN.

4 Followers; 6,211 Posts; 69,389 Profile Views

Thanks you are right. I was thinking along those lines but I was worried I would sound greedy but it's only fair if they are able to pay more. It's not like I'm going to be unreasonable just in par with what others are getting. I'm going to tell them that the pay is not enough and that I have a better offer. Would that be better rather than outright confrontation with HR?

You are not being "greedy" You are asking for fair market value for your skills. Do not mention another offer. You are only discussing THEIR offer. This is NOT a confrontation, it is a simple negotiation. You ask for $xx/hr. They either say yes or no, or counter. It's like buying a house.

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36 Posts; 1,165 Profile Views

You are not being "greedy" You are asking for fair market value for your skills. Do not mention another offer. You are only discussing THEIR offer. This is NOT a confrontation, it is a simple negotiation. You ask for $xx/hr. They either say yes or no, or counter. It's like buying a house.

Thanks so much for the feedback. I guess the attitude comes with being really inexperienced in the job market. I am getting some experience and becoming more skilled so therefore, in my area, I am becoming more in demand. The unfortunate thing is I am not really aggressive and dislike conflict but I do understand the need to stand up for oneself and make sure your needs are met. I really didn't understand the etiquette to doing this the right way. I am going to let her know that I need to renegotiate the rate and see what she says. The worst she can say is no and at that point I can move on to other avenues and learn from this lesson. Thanks for the reply

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36 Posts; 1,165 Profile Views

Back in '02, I had accepted position as a Nursing Supervisor with a salary when I found out that my portion of health insurance premiums were quite a bit higher than with my previous job. I don't remember the exact amount- it may have been $2000. Maybe $4000, but I contacted the administrator, told her I didn't realize my premiums would be as high as they were, and requested the two or four thousand/year a pay raise. The administrator okayed it with HR.

Thank you for that. It's good to hear that at times that can work to speak up about your pay concerns. I have contacted her regarding the issue. She said she will speak to her administrator and let me know. Even if it doesn't work out I feel better to have spoken my mind. I would have resented the job if I didn't say anything.

Thanks so much for everyone who took the time and commented.

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P B and J has 3+ years experience and specializes in Nursing Supervisor.

98 Posts; 4,424 Profile Views

I am the same way, I HATE confrontation, and don't want to come across as being disagreeable. I recently accepted a decent promotion, and when HR called to "officially" offer me the position, she offered me about $0.65 in raise. I (legitimately) paused from shock... and in the silence, she said: "was that not what you were expecting?" I told her I was expecting "a bit more, more like around $xx.00." Anyway, we went back and forth, and with a few more "pregnant pauses", she finally offered about $0.30 less than I had asked for to begin with(!!!), telling me that was her absolute max for my experience without going to "way higher up".

I learned a valuable lesson... use the pauses to your advantage (especially if you are shell-shocked, lol!), and ask for what you think you deserve!!!

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36 Posts; 1,165 Profile Views

I am the same way, I HATE confrontation, and don't want to come across as being disagreeable. I recently accepted a decent promotion, and when HR called to "officially" offer me the position, she offered me about $0.65 in raise. I (legitimately) paused from shock... and in the silence, she said: "was that not what you were expecting?" I told her I was expecting "a bit more, more like around $xx.00." Anyway, we went back and forth, and with a few more "pregnant pauses", she finally offered about $0.30 less than I had asked for to begin with(!!!), telling me that was her absolute max for my experience without going to "way higher up".

I learned a valuable lesson... use the pauses to your advantage (especially if you are shell-shocked, lol!), and ask for what you think you deserve!!!

That is very true. I think some people infer a lot of conversations in the pauses and that can be in our advantage at times or work against us depending. Thanks for the comment.

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36 Posts; 1,165 Profile Views

Libby thank you so much. I spoke to her a few days later and spoke your words almost verbatim. She said she would think on it. I waited about a week of radio silence and i almost cracked and just gave up on the whole thing when she reached back to me and increased the salary to exactly what the rate i was told was the expected one for this position. She wasn't confrontational or angry, she just agreed. I think that's when i realized that she could have disagreed and still the situation would have remained at the same emotional level, the anxiety was only the one i invested into the situation. I hope to learn better in the future and not be afraid to express my needs or concerns.

Thanks so much for taking the time to comment.

Sammie

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