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what path do I take? LPN and bridge, straight to RN?

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by lsthomas7 lsthomas7 (New) New

Hi! can someone help me figure out which path to take? I am 22 years old and I am just now considering nursing school. I do not have anyone providing for me which should be taken into consideration when talking about funding school and financial aid. I also get antsy when it takes long to complete something. In other words I am impatient, so I was thinking about the LPN program and then bridge to RN. My only concern is that if at any point I was interested in working in a hospital, my chances of achieving that goal will be slim to none because of this new 80: 20 ratio. Currently I work as a caregiver for an agency serving hospice clients. I like that I am able to create my own schedule, & I don't have much supervision. That is good for me because I'm very independent and don't like someone breathing over me, dictating which moves to make. I would like to continue the same type of work that I do now, home care, but broaden my scope of practice... I just need to make a better living for myself. So the question stands, which path do I take to pursue an education in nursing?

BostonNurseNic, BSN

Has 6 years experience.

Just go straight for RN. You never know when life will get in the way of your plans, postponing a bridge program. Another thing to consider is employers aren't always flexible with school schedules.

That makes sense. Thank you :)

applesxoranges, BSN, RN

Specializes in ER.

What is 80:20 ratio? To be honest, LPNs can still get jobs within psych usually. Our psych hospitals hire for the psych floors. I would research your area. We hire a lot of RNs with ADNs but require a bachelors within 5 years. It is not hard to get your ADN and plan ahead to get a bachelors. I knocked mine out within 1 year of graduating with a 3 month break.

Ioreth, ADN, RN

Specializes in Ortho-Neuro. Has 2 years experience.

Here's what I am planning to do, and I have similar considerations: little funding and need to complete school as quick as possible. I am going for a second bachelor degree so I have less financial aid available to me than I would have if I was starting fresh. Also I have 2 kids at home, one is special needs, so I have many time constraints.

1. Fill out and turn in FAFSA and see what kind of financial aid you have available to you. You might get grants that you didn't expect.

2. Take a short course and start working as a CNA now. Here, the short courses are one month long and cost a little under $1000. Working as a CNA will let you see more of the nursing profession and help you nail down what you want to do. You won't be paid much, but the experience will make you a better nurse. Some programs, such as the one I will be attending, require a CNA license before starting nursing school.

3. Work as a CNA while doing the prerequisites for the RN program at the local community college. Estimated time to complete prereqs: 3 semesters.

4. Start nursing school. Where I live, a Associate of Science in Nursing (ADN) is a 2 year program. Many people here continue working as CNA because they won't be technically full time students any more and won't be eligible for financial aid.

5. Look into a RN to BSN dual enrollment program. This means you can start working towards a BSN degree while still working on the ADN. Many of these are entirely online too.

This route will have me as a BSN in 3 years +1 semester. Many employers are requiring BSN, so definitely look into it no matter what you decide to do.

applesxoranges, BSN, RN

Specializes in ER.

I've never heard of an RN to BSN dual enrollment. I don't think they are common. There are some partner schools which will give students the recommendations for which classes to take to fulfill certain requirements. My RN to BSN school had all the classes that transferred typed up on a sheet and I used it to pick my classes carefully. Most RN to BSN programs will not accept enrollment from non-RNs or require licensure within the first semester.

3. Work as a CNA while doing the prerequisites for the RN program at the local community college. Estimated time to complete prereqs: 3 semesters.

4. Start nursing school. Where I live, a Associate of Science in Nursing (ADN) is a 2 year program. Many people here continue working as CNA because they won't be technically full time students any more and won't be eligible for financial aid.

okay, would it make sense to complete the entire degree at a community college, including clinicals vs. Transferring out after prerequisites? When going into a BSN program, will they break the ADN credit for credit or will they accept the ADN as a prereq altogether? I'm afraid that if I put all of the effort in at community, something will not transfer over seamlessly and I'll be forced to retake or something.

I would do the RN program and just get it over with! If your concerned about financial issues, take out student loans to help pay your bills. You'll be making enough money after you graduate to be able and pay them back.

Also at my school the ADN program only goes 3 days a week, so you're still able to work. Whereas the LVN go Monday-Friday because it is so crammed.