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OR or CC FLOAT pros and cons

Nurses   (1,008 Views 9 Comments)
by lifetimelearner lifetimelearner (New Member) New Member

510 Profile Views; 7 Posts

New grad here and interviewed for two jobs I would very much be interested in but can't make up my mind.

What are the pro's and con's to each area from a nurse's point of view.

Thanks for the help.

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Blee O'Myacin is a BSN, RN and specializes in ED, ICU, Heme/Onc.

721 Posts; 5,727 Profile Views

Hi - congrats on graduating!

I wouldn't float anywhere as a new grad - but that's just me. I'd find a nice, steady staff position and get comfy there for about a year. Floating implies a level of flexibility that you have not received training for. Unless they plan on having you orient for a good three months, I'd look elsewhere. I'm saying this as a nurse who feels that new grads can do just fine in the Unit and the OR as long as the orientation is adequate to meet the needs of a new grad.

I currently am working in a float position after 2 years in a staff position. I love the flexibility, but also have to roll with the idea that my assigment and unit might change each day that I am at work - or even twice in a shift (that only happened once though).

If you feel that floating is right for you, then just make sure the training time is adequate. On my first day off orientation, I floated to a unit where I didn't even know where the bathroom was. It was the tele unit and I hit the ground running with five patients, two nursing students (thank goodness) and a friendly staff who were more than happy to point me in the right direction. This is after I spent two years as staff on a unit and received my orientation as ICU float - so I was a wee bit overwhelmed that first day!!

Good luck with whatever you decide!

Blee

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Dinith88 has 15 years experience and specializes in CCU/CVU/ICU.

720 Posts; 11,084 Profile Views

a 'float' is best suited to experienced nurses. Critical-Care float would be even more difficult for a new grad. I am doubtful that a hospital (that wasnt ridiculously desperate) would even consider a new-grad for a critical-care float position.

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7 Posts; 510 Profile Views

Hi - congrats on graduating!

I wouldn't float anywhere as a new grad - but that's just me. I'd find a nice, steady staff position and get comfy there for about a year. Floating implies a level of flexibility that you have not received training for. Unless they plan on having you orient for a good three months, I'd look elsewhere. I'm saying this as a nurse who feels that new grads can do just fine in the Unit and the OR as long as the orientation is adequate to meet the needs of a new grad.

I currently am working in a float position after 2 years in a staff position. I love the flexibility, but also have to roll with the idea that my assigment and unit might change each day that I am at work - or even twice in a shift (that only happened once though).

If you feel that floating is right for you, then just make sure the training time is adequate. On my first day off orientation, I floated to a unit where I didn't even know where the bathroom was. It was the tele unit and I hit the ground running with five patients, two nursing students (thank goodness) and a friendly staff who were more than happy to point me in the right direction. This is after I spent two years as staff on a unit and received my orientation as ICU float - so I was a wee bit overwhelmed that first day!!

Good luck with whatever you decide!

Blee

I like the idea of not having the same day. I also like the idea because I am bit of a social butterfly. What I am actually afraid of is the idea of having to take care of ACUTE patients. I didn't choose a practicum with ACUTE patients, I did one rotation in Oncology but I felt my patients where not ACUTE enough as an ICU or ER. I love the idea of learning all the equipment and how it works. I love the idea of never having the same day, but that could be a down fall. I read some other forums and heard many people complain that they are treated poorly because they are not part of the floor.

The hospital is a small hospital. I applied to the ER but was offered a float CC days. The OR is interesting because of a set shift, whereas the float is variable.

Thanks for all your input

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7 Posts; 510 Profile Views

a 'float' is best suited to experienced nurses. Critical-Care float would be even more difficult for a new grad. I am doubtful that a hospital (that wasnt ridiculously desperate) would even consider a new-grad for a critical-care float position.

I felt the same way about them being ridiculously desperate. I just think when I intereviewed with the ER, ICU and Progressive care managers they all like me. I loved them too. The OR position is something interesting because that is what I did my senior practicum in, CVOR. I think the OR will turn out to be boring for me in the long run. I have an A type personality and very social.

Thanks for all the advice

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RNperdiem has 14 years experience as a RN.

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Floating is great for a social butterfly. I worked ICU float pool for a few years. I would not recommend it for a new graduate though. A new grad needs the stability of a home unit. The downside is a float nurse does not have a "home". I did not really belong anywhere; sometimes I didn't even have a mailbox to call my own. The float department was handed around to different managers over the years as an add on to the managers' assignments.

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7 Posts; 510 Profile Views

Floating is great for a social butterfly. I worked ICU float pool for a few years. I would not recommend it for a new graduate though. A new grad needs the stability of a home unit. The downside is a float nurse does not have a "home". I did not really belong anywhere; sometimes I didn't even have a mailbox to call my own. The float department was handed around to different managers over the years as an add on to the managers' assignments.

Yea i noticed that the manager for ICU is also the manager for FLOAT. It just seems like a great opportunity not worth passing up. THe OR on the other hand I worry about not being able to transition to another M-F job like an occupational nurse.

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118 Posts; 3,814 Profile Views

:o No offense to you but as a new grad float nurse in critical care you'll be as popular as the plague with the nurses you work with. A float nurse is expected to be able to come in and with the absolute minimum of instruction take any assignment and do it safely and to standard. Frankly you have the skills and experience to do neither. You will have to be given the lightest assignments and the most help. I would question any unit manager that would put a new grad in a float position. Additionally, the ICU is not the place to socialize, it's pretty much all business all the time. I know this sounds harsh but you are setting yourself up for failure. Don't do this to yourself or your patients. Best of luck with your decision.

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7 Posts; 510 Profile Views

:o No offense to you but as a new grad float nurse in critical care you'll be as popular as the plague with the nurses you work with. A float nurse is expected to be able to come in and with the absolute minimum of instruction take any assignment and do it safely and to standard. Frankly you have the skills and experience to do neither. You will have to be given the lightest assignments and the most help. I would question any unit manager that would put a new grad in a float position. Additionally, the ICU is not the place to socialize, it's pretty much all business all the time. I know this sounds harsh but you are setting yourself up for failure. Don't do this to yourself or your patients. Best of luck with your decision.

Thats the feedback I needed. I feel the same way. I am scared to death. I like the idea of all the electronic stuff since this is my second career. First career was an Engineer in hightech. I totally see everyones point of view. FLOAT is not a good point to start as a new grad. I also the importance of patient safety in the equation which is the most important.

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