Jump to content

Online Programs... good or bad? Your opinion please!

Online Learning   (5,011 Views | 27 Replies)
by Enza Enza Member

1,112 Profile Views; 28 Posts

You are reading page 2 of Online Programs... good or bad? Your opinion please!. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

ckh23 has 6 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in ER/ICU/STICU.

1,446 Posts; 15,468 Profile Views

In my program the only two classes I had tests were patho and pharm and I had to go to my local library to take them online and proctored. All of my other classes were mostly papers, discussions, and a few quizzes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

28 Posts; 1,112 Profile Views

okay

thanks for your help!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

morecoffeepls has 5 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Psychiatry.

3 Articles; 122 Posts; 8,205 Profile Views

I'll finish an online RN-BSN program soon. Do yourself a favor and realize that these programs apparently differ greatly from one another in format because my experience is dissimilar to some others' who have posted responses.

My overall opinion is that I've learned very little, but will have some additional letters behind my name and a fair amount of debt when this thing is done. I've been taking 2 classes per 8-week "module" and working full-time nights for what feels like an interminable amount of time without a break. I'm fried. Some classes are more challenging than others, but they all demand a lot of time. That's what makes it so stressful. I think there would be less work to do in a traditional classroom/lecture hall environment.

I could complain about the negative aspects of this experience (absentee instructors, issues with the technology, not being able to be in a room full of young motivated females in the Spring, etc.), but the reality is that I'm pretty sure I'll graduate with a 4.0, that it's been terribly convenient, and that I'll now be able to apply to the Psych APRN programs that I had in mind when I went back to school (again). The only reason I'm picking up a BSN is because both of the only two schools that offer what I want in an advanced degree advised that I do so; otherwise, I would have tried for an RN-MSN degree & saved myself the time and additional tuition. Have you considered that? If you've already made comment on it, I missed it & apologize.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

28 Posts; 1,112 Profile Views

In what ways is your program different?

and no, I haven't commented on taking an RN to MSN although I have considered it.

The reason I chose BSN is because most hospitals near me are becoming magnet and are requiring nurses to have a BSN. Also, I am very interested in becoming a CRNA and apparently you need two years of experience with a BSN in order to get accepted into most CRNA programs so it would essentially be pointless to go RN to MSN.. at least from my understanding.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ckh23 has 6 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in ER/ICU/STICU.

1,446 Posts; 15,468 Profile Views

In what ways is your program different?

and no, I haven't commented on taking an RN to MSN although I have considered it.

The reason I chose BSN is because most hospitals near me are becoming magnet and are requiring nurses to have a BSN. Also, I am very interested in becoming a CRNA and apparently you need two years of experience with a BSN in order to get accepted into most CRNA programs so it would essentially be pointless to go RN to MSN.. at least from my understanding.

Crna programs vary. I would check about having a bsn for 2 years. The general requirement is 2 or more years of critical care experience. They do look at your undergrad GPA, but no program I have come across requires having your BSN for 2 years, but that you have it.

If your ultimate goal is CRNA than there is no point in getting your masters.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1 Post; 465 Profile Views

CRNA like NP is going to require a doctorate by 2015. Make sure that you have enough time to graduate if that is the route you're looking at.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ckh23 has 6 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in ER/ICU/STICU.

1,446 Posts; 15,468 Profile Views

CRNA like NP is going to require a doctorate by 2015. Make sure that you have enough time to graduate if that is the route you're looking at.

Actually the AANA supports an entry level doctorate by 2025. I don't believe anything is written in stone as of yet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

28 Posts; 1,112 Profile Views

wait what does this all mean?

because I'm starting my ADN now and im just trying to plan out my educational future.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ckh23 has 6 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in ER/ICU/STICU.

1,446 Posts; 15,468 Profile Views

It just means that after 2025 crna programs will graduate nurses with DNAPs instead of masters degrees or post master certificates.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

66 Posts; 2,402 Profile Views

Hi,

I'm in the ADN online program right now at my school. We basically do all lecture time online. Its a do it yourself type of thing. They break everything down into modules. Each module contains readings, resources, assignments, exams, etc. to use. There are videos but the teacher is never online. We go to lab once a week for a few hours and thats our time to practice hands on what we're learning and ask the instructor any questions we may have. Then once we finish the modules we start clinicals.

Honestly, so far its worked for me. The schedule isn't nearly as crazy as on campus, but u teach yourself a majority of the material. I finish level 1 in december being that they have pushed back our clinical times but its given me the advantage of keeping my day job thus far. A typical day is 9-5 at work then coming home and studying till around 9 before i head to the gym. On non gym days, its studying 5-whenever i get tired. In the beginning, one of my pre req instructors said that online nursing students "weren't as qualified as on campus students" which i think is crap. It kind of put me down, but i studied my buns off and I feel like I've learned alot. Ofcourse, like ANY beginning nursing student will tell you, they're nervous and they second guess what they've learned. Its not just an online nursing student thing. If i could've gone through the on campus program i would've, but it isn't an option with bills.

I plan on going for BSN as well once i get done with my ADN. I'm pretty positive i'm going for an online program again.

Hope I answered some of your questions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ScrubCap has 10 years experience and specializes in Med/Surg, Surgery, Post Partum, GYN.

27 Posts; 1,915 Profile Views

I completed my BSN through an online program and found that it was a nice fit for me as well as my family. My original nursing degree is from a hospital-based diploma program, so I had plenty of clinical experience, and also, I didn't start my BSN until I had already been a nurse for 6 years. With many online programs, however, you don't need to have much experience, just being an RN is the only requirement, although it certainly does help to bring more depth to the classroom discussions.

My online program was accelerated, and I took 2 classes every 8 weeks. A traditional classroom course is over a 16-week semester, so this gives you an idea of the time frame. Online classes are typically a lot more work than what you would do if you were going to campus and you definitely have to be self-motivated and organized.

The online class is divided into weekly schedules and there are reading assignments and required postings that you will have to do - by that I mean that the instructor will assign anywhere from 1-3 questions every week that require a paragraph response. Some questions deal with reading assignments, others deal with practical experience, or some deal with current events. Also, you are required to make so many responses to your classmates and you are graded on the "depth" of your responses - they are not looking for yes and no responses, or simple "i agree" responses - they want to see that you are contributing and learning something from the discussions. Also, you might have weekly quizzes and tests, or you might be required to write papers. In several of my classes, we did group projects. I was a little unsure how this would work since we were spread all over the country, but it actually was a nice learning experience - we communicated through email and/or phone, elected a group coordinator, divided the assignment, and communicated pretty much on a daily basis. These group projects usually involved some sort of power point presentation that we submitted for the entire class to review.

Another component of online classes that you may run across are the journal assignments. Some instructors require you to complete a weekly reflection or they ask you to journal about a specific topic. To take attendence, most classes have an "attendance tab" in which you have to log in on the last day of the week (usually the classes run from Sunday-Saturday) and you have to log in and post what you have learned throughout the week. Most online programs also allow the instructor to see how many times you have logged in, and they will give you specific deadlines for each assignment and posting (i.e. post initial response by 11:00 pm EST Tuesday, etc.).

I found that the instructors were always very clear of their course expectations. They provide you with an online syllabus and assignment schedules, and they are readily available to answer questions. When I took my BSN classes, my children were 1 and 3, and I was pregnant with my third. I worked 7 am to 3:30 pm at the time (in surgery) and wouldn't start school work until after they were in bed. My husband was also very supportive and helped a lot with the kids, especially on the weekends, so I could get a bulk of my work done. Online school is very manageable, but you have to be very organized and motivated - it is not for everyone. My husband is also an RN and tried the same online program, but it wasn't a good fit for him; he learns better in the classroom setting.

Good luck with your decision to return to school and to complete your BSN!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

mema1 specializes in Peri anesthesia/L&D.

12 Posts; 766 Profile Views

On-line school makes it possible to work and go to school without taking anymore time away from your family. I had been a LPN for over 2o+ years when I decided I had had enough! I researched for on-line schools that would allow me to obtain my RN. I found it thru Chamberlain College of Nursing( there are many to chose from). They understood my goals and needs. I was able to work fulltime nights and obtain my RN degree, while raising a small child too.

Go for it!!!!!! What will you be doing this time next year if you don't?? I will not say it is easy, but after you figure out the system, you will excel if this is what you truly want!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I will be glad to talk with anyone about on line classes, just e-mail at: damcrews@hotmail.com and I will e-mail back or give you my telephone to talk with you.

Whatever way you decide to obtain you dreams.......just do it!!!:yeah:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
×

This site uses cookies. By using this site, you consent to the placement of these cookies. Read our Privacy, Cookies, and Terms of Service Policies to learn more.