Jump to content

Offered a Postition from a Home Health agency should I take it?

Job Hunt   (3,505 Views | 33 Replies)

1,475 Profile Views; 35 Posts

Should I take a Home Health agency job if I am a new grad, so far no offers from hospital?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

mindofmidwifery is a ADN and specializes in ICU Stepdown.

1,419 Posts; 14,943 Profile Views

Does home health sound like it would be suitable for you? You have to start somewhere but if home health doesn't sound like a good fit I would say no. Have you applied for any LTC positions?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

35 Posts; 1,475 Profile Views

I have not applied for LTC, worked LTC when I was a CNA, do not like that type of struture really pefer hopsital no offers so far.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

249 Posts; 6,877 Profile Views

I was recently hired as a new grad into a private duty home care agency. I have one "client" with 12 hours shifts. I had always heard that it's best to have experience in this role, but I couldn't afford to wait for that coveted hospital med-surg job. So far, I am finding several advantages. One is that the pace in not as hectic as floor nursing. There's time to look up a med or double check your charting, even time to eat a few bites while charting and planning next cares. I am being super-cautious. If I have any doubts about cares, nursing procedures, client status there is an on-call nurse available by phone 24/7. My client is considered "non-complex" as opposed to the "complex" clients and the pay is a couple dollars less per hour. So far it feels like a good fit as a place to start with less pressure and less intimidation than a hospital floor.

A word of caution: check the company's policies about mileage reimbursement, eligibility for benefits, how wages and shift differentials are figured, time off, etc. I've been a bit disappointed to find that hours promised are subject to change, and benefits not automatically granted...there may be stipulations and "fine print," so be sure you know what you're getting into. I also had to ask for extra training because my one day of orientation in the home, provided by the family, was not nearly enough. I had too many unanswered questions and didn't feel ready to go it alone. Thankfully, the agency reluctantly agree for three more shifts of orientation, and that made all the difference in my confidence level.

Once you accept the job and report for duty, you have been hired. Then it's awkward and looks bad on your employment record to quit right away! Because the Job Search can be so long and arduous, I think we have a tendency to accept the first job offer. In my case this made sense, but if you can afford to think it through carefully or hold out for the dream job, then do so!

Good luck and let us know what you decide.

Edited by Flatlander

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

249 Posts; 6,877 Profile Views

Regarding LTC. The ones I have interviewed for would be a tough challenge for a new nurse. Minimal orientation, often the only nurse for 40 or more residents, especially on nights (I've heard of as many as 60!) --- plus supervision of CNA's. I know some people can handle it as a new nurse, but plenty others have expressed their disillusionment on this site.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

35 Posts; 1,475 Profile Views

Flatlander,

Thanks for the advice and I agree with you 100%, I can not afford to wait for a hospital offer and from my own expericence LTC are verry challenging. I am interviewing with the Home Health Care Agency tommorow. I heard that they do pay mileage reimbursement, they have benefits and they have on the job training which you train with another nurse, they also provide a I Phone and and tablet, the down side I hear is that their is a lot of paper work involve, I would perfer to work at an hospital but so far this is my first interview since graduation.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

249 Posts; 6,877 Profile Views

Honestly, Jaytee, this is the first time I've felt like a real nurse. I have time to provide some human interaction and caring along with the nursing, rather than having to rush off to the next patient. I have some autonomy and am organizing the workload, which is significant, without someone looking over my shoulder or telling me I'm not going fast enough. And you know what? I'm getting the job done and the client and family seem pleased.

The atmosphere is so much more relaxed than the hospital floor. In between shifts I have time to increase my nursing knowledge and that feels like a gift. If I do decide to look for another job, while doing the best I can at the home care, there's no harm in that, either.

I say go for it! The hospital will still be there if you decide you don't like home care. I promised myself to stick it out for at least six months, so as not to be a job hopper. Already, I know the experience will be valuable.

Good luck with your decision. I like to "sleep on it" when I have to choose a course of action. Then try to trust my instincts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

35 Posts; 1,475 Profile Views

Flatlander, thanks for the advice it made sense:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

10 Posts; 947 Profile Views

I would accept the position. Stay and see if it's a good fit for you. The reality of it is most hospitals will not accept new grads without a least one year experience. I would take it until you get the experience. Good luck with whatever decision you choose.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

249 Posts; 6,877 Profile Views

Oh, and after you're hired (if you decide to take it) be sure to find out about Liability Insurance. At orientation, it was strongly advised to have your own policy, since the company liability might not cover you in all situations. I'm told that basic policies are available for around $100 annually.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

4 Followers; 37,683 Posts; 103,095 Profile Views

What kind of, and how much, of an orientation have they offered you? You can grow into a home health job, but there have to be a lot of positive aspects to the situation.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

249 Posts; 6,877 Profile Views

Good question, caliotter3. I "thought" they said I'd get 2 weeks and it turned out to be 2 days training on vents and central lines, etc in office, and one day (!) in the home provided by a family member. I wasn't comfortable with that and was given 3 more shifts with 3 different nurses, both days and nights. That gave me a chance to see how they've been doing all the cares and treatments, lifts, meds, paperwork, round the clock, etc. I felt qualified, but this was all with just one patient. If there were multiple clients or more complex, it might require more orientation. There is 24/7 on-call nurse available for questions. The other nurses for this client offered their personal phone numbers if I have questions, and the extended family is available to answer questions or help. In this case, there always seems to be a family member around who is up to date on patient's care needs.

I'm guessing that the degree of support available for this particular client is one reason I was assigned this case as a new grad. So far it has been a good introduction. One of the nurses who trained me is one of the best I've ever seen. Super-organized, gets it all done, friendly, cheerful, relaxed, and a terrific teacher. That was a stroke of luck!

Edited by Flatlander

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
×

This site uses cookies. By using this site, you consent to the placement of these cookies. Read our Privacy, Cookies, and Terms of Service Policies to learn more.