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Obstetrics For Nurses - Circa 1906

Ob/Gyn   (2,742 Views 13 Comments)
by DoGoodThenGo DoGoodThenGo (Member)

DoGoodThenGo works as a Entrepreneur - Business Owner.

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Cleaning out the "bookmark" files in my computer, and thought someone might find this interesting.

Cannot remember how one came upon this, was either for a research project or just looking for something interesting to read.

http://books.google.com/books?id=DvV3iWJkBbcC&dq=boiling+linen

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Elvish is a BSN, DNP, RN, NP and works as a OB, Nursery.

3 Followers; 17 Articles; 65,781 Visitors; 5,259 Posts

Moved to Ob/Gyn nursing forum....and I am looking at it now. Interesting stuff!

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DoGoodThenGo works as a Entrepreneur - Business Owner.

40,150 Visitors; 4,111 Posts

Moved to Ob/Gyn nursing forum....and I am looking at it now. Interesting stuff!

Thank you!

Hope you enjoy the read as much as I did. Actually made a cup of tea and had some cookies.:D

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bewitched has 4 years experience and works as a Assistant Nurse Manager.

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Interesting how the book notes that "the public thinks that delivery is something that requires no special care" and that women are "admitted due to the complications of delivery" at home etc, whereas today women are made to think that they can't possibly have kids outside of the hospital setting. An interesting turnaround in 100 years.

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2,725 Visitors; 161 Posts

I still have a couple of my grandmother's nursing textbooks from 1918-1920. Fascating stuff, probably put me on the path to nursing.

Alos have a book of poems for nurses that was one of her graduation presents. First page is rules for nurses - one is always sleep with a window open. One of these days I'll post them all.

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Elvish is a BSN, DNP, RN, NP and works as a OB, Nursery.

3 Followers; 17 Articles; 65,781 Visitors; 5,259 Posts

I'm not going to be able to finish this tonight, but it is sooo fascinating. I think the multiple references to 'hysteria' were interesting, and I REALLY liked the part about labor: "No babbling relatives or friends should be allowed in the room."

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2,725 Visitors; 161 Posts

"No babbling relatives or friends should be allowed in the room."

Sometimes the old rules still make perfect sense!:lol2:

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mommyRN09 works as a RN.

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LOVE this! Thanks for sharing! :)

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llg has 40 years experience as a PhD, RN and works as a Nursing Professional Development + Academic Facult.

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Thanks for the link. I love nursing history and will come back and read it later.

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DoGoodThenGo works as a Entrepreneur - Business Owner.

40,150 Visitors; 4,111 Posts

Just so you girls know, there is a chapter along with a few pictures of what may fall under "partial term abortion" today. Literally speaking about how to, well for lack of a better term, cut apart and remove a stillborn. Not easy reading for the faint of heart.

Another thing, what is up with all that use of Lysol? :D Isn't phenol (main chemical in the product), toxic to newborns? Know Lysol was advertised back then as a douche and method of birth control, but still.

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DoGoodThenGo works as a Entrepreneur - Business Owner.

40,150 Visitors; 4,111 Posts

I'm not going to be able to finish this tonight, but it is sooo fascinating. I think the multiple references to 'hysteria' were interesting, and I REALLY liked the part about labor: "No babbling relatives or friends should be allowed in the room."

Well that "hysteria" might come from keeping women ignorant of what was happening whislt waiting and happened during L&D. There are a number of references in this book for instance about not allowing mothers to be to read "medical" journals, nor hear stories (good or bad), from females. Once her time came it seems this was very much the era where childbirth was seen as a "disease" that is something to be managed, and the woman wasn't supposed to bother herself too much with the "treatment", aside from doing what she was told.

OTHO once one read this book I finally understood for all the calls for "boiling water" in period films and books when a woman went into labour.:D

On a housekeeping note, this book was published before modern washing machines and detergents were common place. One can only imagine the loads of soiled linens and such a home birth generated, and the poor launderess or maid that had to do all that washing/stain removal.

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Elvish is a BSN, DNP, RN, NP and works as a OB, Nursery.

3 Followers; 17 Articles; 65,781 Visitors; 5,259 Posts

Well that "hysteria" might come from keeping women ignorant of what was happening whislt waiting and happened during L&D. There are a number of references in this book for instance about not allowing mothers to be to read "medical" journals, nor hear stories (good or bad), from females. Once her time came it seems this was very much the era where childbirth was seen as a "disease" that is something to be managed, and the woman wasn't supposed to bother herself too much with the "treatment", aside from doing what she was told.

Oh, I understand all that. I was trying to be polite and call it 'interesting' when a few more colorful adjectives came to mind. :D

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