pulsatilla as a homeopathic remedy

  1. I am reading that pulsatilla is used to improve a deficient flow of milk or to dry up milk if the mother is weaning

    why can pulsatilla do both?
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    About GingerSue

    Joined: Oct '04; Posts: 1,975; Likes: 254
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    Specialty: 20 year(s) of experience

    7 Comments

  3. by   tinyscrafts
    what source did you find that in? I've never heard that.
    AFAIK, Pullsatilla is a changer of changeable things used mostly for breech, posterior. so in that sense it changes whatever is moveable to the opposite state.

    To dry up milk flow i've more often heard of sage, usually sage tea. To imporve milk flow, well, off to the IBCLC with you! Thats not something to mess around with trying to fix yourself...
  4. by   GingerSue
    the source - is Sally B. Olds, Marcia L. London, Patricia Wieland Ladewig, and Michele R. Davidson Maternal-Newborn Nursing & Women's Health Care (2004)

    They describe pulsatilla, a homeopathic remedy, is used to improve a deficient flow of milk or to dry up the milk if the mother is weaning a child
    And they mention some herbs that may decrease milk supply so they should be avoided until a woman is no longer breastfeeding: sage, parsley, black walnut, and yarrow

    Herbs that'll increase the milk supply are listed: dandelion, alfalfa, fennel, horsetail, red raspberry, caraway, and anise ... and chaste tree (known as vitex) may be helpful in cases of insufficient lactation
  5. by   CEG
    Quote from GingerSue
    the source - is Sally B. Olds, Marcia L. London, Patricia Wieland Ladewig, and Michele R. Davidson Maternal-Newborn Nursing & Women's Health Care (2004)

    They describe pulsatilla, a homeopathic remedy, is used to improve a deficient flow of milk or to dry up the milk if the mother is weaning a child
    And they mention some herbs that may decrease milk supply so they should be avoided until a woman is no longer breastfeeding: sage, parsley, black walnut, and yarrow

    Herbs that'll increase the milk supply are listed: dandelion, alfalfa, fennel, horsetail, red raspberry, caraway, and anise ... and chaste tree (known as vitex) may be helpful in cases of insufficient lactation
    That book sounds strange. I have only heard of pulsatilla for positioning issues. Also Vitex (chasteberry) affects the estrogen balance in the body and I would think should NOT be taken at all during breastfeeding. I would expect it to lower milk supply. If you are really looking for herbal info I would probably consult another source.
  6. by   GingerSue
    Quote from CEG
    That book sounds strange. I have only heard of pulsatilla for positioning issues. Also Vitex (chasteberry) affects the estrogen balance in the body and I would think should NOT be taken at all during breastfeeding. I would expect it to lower milk supply. If you are really looking for herbal info I would probably consult another source.

    these items are listed in the maternal-newborn textbook in the chapter about newborn nutrition

    Chaste tree (vitex) is listed as being helpful in cases of insufficient lactation

    anyone know about vitex? - it would appear that the textbook differs from the above post
  7. by   mitchsmom
    Hi GingerSue,

    Again I'd recommend The Nursing Mother's Herbal, which has information on this for you (too long to type out this time!!)

    I also used the Sally B. Olds, Marcia L. London, Patricia Wieland Ladewig, and Michele R. Davidson Maternal-Newborn Nursing & Women's Health Care textbook during nursing school, it seems fine to me (I never noticed all the mention of herbs related to lactation... will have to go have a look!).

    Vitex (Chasteberry) is included in detail in the Nursing Mother's Herbal book. It does not appear to be recommended at this time for use during lactation.

    Pulsatilla is mentioned as a category C- but that is leaf, stem & not homeopathic strength (homeopathic strengths are usually tiny tiny quantities). I think the reason it would theoretically do both is because of the homeopathic concentration - I think many homeopathics work that way. Taking herbs via parts of the actual plant, or in tinctures, teas, etc. is different than using the substance homeopathically - two different things.
    Anyway, it says to seek an expert herbalist as well as a lactation consultation before use.

    I have heard of most of those things you mentioned for increasing/decreasing supply, going into each one would be kind of a lot of work. The textbook probably mentions them just to be familiar with things you may hear of

    Peppermint can also contribute to drying up (think eating tons of peppermint altoids). We somtimes remind moms to be careful during the holidays when they may be eating sage, peppermint, parsely, and (probably more importantly) being very busy & missing feedings, not eating/hydrating well, getting too little rest, stressing out, etc. But usually just a normal small amount of sage in Thanksgiving dinner is not going to affect anything so it's not a real big deal - like I said, it's usually other factors at hand although taken all together it can be something.

    If you are just wanting to know about common herbs used during breastfeeding, again, I would probably start withfenugreek first since it is fairly commonly used. Some of the other galactogoues you mention are used in 'nursing mother's teas'. Some may have effects on GI health, which some lactation people have anecdotally noticed can be related to lactation (better GI health - better lactation, but that's really getting into anecdotal/casual theories in lactation circles). Here's a page on herbs and breastfeeding.
  8. by   GingerSue
    thanks

    (in Olds, the mention of herbs is in little boxes throughout the chapters)
  9. by   mitchsmom
    Quote from GingerSue
    thanks

    (in Olds, the mention of herbs is in little boxes throughout the chapters)

    cool, I'll have to check that out

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