OB terminology

  1. Hi all,

    I am a student and our class is having a debate (awaiting clarification from instructor) as to what exactly para is. Specifically...if there is a primigravida who is due any day now (obviously beyond the 20 weeks) is she a para 1 yet or not until after she delivers? In other words, does para only indicate delivery or any pregnancy beyond 20 weeks? I would appreciate any help from you seasoned OB nurses. We have two textbooks that both are vague in description and do not address the current pregnancy.

    Thanks!
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  3. by   daisybaby
    Hi- according to Taber's Cyclopedic Medical Dictionary (19th Ed), parity is "The condition of having carried a pregnancy to a point of viability (500g birth weight or 20 weeks' gestation) regardless of the outcome."

    So it's my understading that a primigravida woman who is at 20 weeks would be gravida 1, para 1. Using the standard GTPAL acronym, though, she would be 1 0 0 0 0 until she is no longer pregnant.

    Hope that helps!
  4. by   camay1221_RN
    Quote from fleasle
    Hi all,

    I am a student and our class is having a debate (awaiting clarification from instructor) as to what exactly para is. Specifically...if there is a primigravida who is due any day now (obviously beyond the 20 weeks) is she a para 1 yet or not until after she delivers? In other words, does para only indicate delivery or any pregnancy beyond 20 weeks? I would appreciate any help from you seasoned OB nurses. We have two textbooks that both are vague in description and do not address the current pregnancy.

    Thanks!

    Hi!

    If the woman is still pregnant, she is considered G1 Para 0
  5. by   Fun2, RN, BSN
    Maybe someone else could help more, but I learned it this way:

    Gravida=pregnancy
    Para = given birth
    primigravida = a women pregnant with her first pregnancy

    Therefore, if a woman has had 4 pregnancies, but only 2 births, I would write:

    para 2 / gravida 4


    Someone please correct me if I remember this wrong.
  6. by   BETSRN
    Quote from fleasle
    Hi all,

    I am a student and our class is having a debate (awaiting clarification from instructor) as to what exactly para is. Specifically...if there is a primigravida who is due any day now (obviously beyond the 20 weeks) is she a para 1 yet or not until after she delivers? In other words, does para only indicate delivery or any pregnancy beyond 20 weeks? I would appreciate any help from you seasoned OB nurses. We have two textbooks that both are vague in description and do not address the current pregnancy.

    Thanks!
    Para refers to live births. If she is a primip (primigravida :meaning first pregnancy) and still pregnant then she is a gravida 1 para 0 ( or G1P0), because she has not delivered as yet.
  7. by   CA CoCoRN
    Not to step on your toes...but para refers to BIRTHS (beyond the age of "viability", 20 weeks)...period. NOT just LIVE births. You're still a para 1 if you've given birth to a 21 weeker or a 38 weeker who's stillborn/doesn't make it.
    Your GPTPAL would look like this: G1P1 (Term: 0, Preterm: 1; AB:0; Living: 0 )
  8. by   aedis_aegypti
    she is g1 p0..parity refers to completed pregnancy...
  9. by   ElvishDNP
    Para is defined as any pregnancy beyond 20 weeks, regardless of the outcome.
    So often at work I hear someone say "oh, she's a G5P1 with a hx of two IUFDs at 26 & 30 weeks." So, she's had a baby just now. That makes her a G5P3 now, assuming that the other losses were before 20 weeks.

    If she's still pregnant in a first pregnancy, she's still a G1P0.
  10. by   beckinben
    Here's two definitions of para for you:

    "Para: A number that by itself refers to the number of babies delivered that were of sufficient size (500g) or gestational age (20 weeks) to be considered viable, or a series of numbers that summarize the outcomes of previous pregnancies." Williams Obstetrics (21st ed.)

    "Para refers to the number of pregnancies that terminated in the birth of a fetus or fetuses that reached the point of viability. This point is considered to be 20 weeks' gestation (or 500 grams)." Varney's Midwifery (4th ed.)

    Both of these seem to clearly indicate that the woman must be delivered (i.e. the pregnancy is over) to have an increase in her parity. A primagravida due any day would still be a G1P0.
    Last edit by beckinben on Dec 12, '07 : Reason: spelling
  11. by   RNmama05
    My understanding as well is that the term we often use for a G1 P0- "primipara"- is really a misnomer since if a woman has not yet delivered she is technically a "nullipara".

    A woman who comes in as a G1 P0, and then delivers, is also still considered a G1 P0 until after discharge.



    Quote from beckinben
    Here's two definitions of para for you:

    "Para: A number that by itself refers to the number of babies delivered that were of sufficient size (500g) or gestational age (20 weeks) to be considered viable, or a series of numbers that summarize the outcomes of previous pregnancies." Williams Obstetrics (21st ed.)

    "Para refers to the number of pregnancies that terminated in the birth of a fetus or fetuses that reached the point of viability. This point is considered to be 20 weeks' gestation (or 500 grams)." Varney's Midwifery (4th ed.)

    Both of these seem to clearly indicate that the woman must be delivered (i.e. the pregnancy is over) to have an increase in her parity. A primagravida due any day would still be a G1P0.
  12. by   ElvishDNP
    Quote from RNmama05
    My understanding as well is that the term we often use for a G1 P0- "primipara"- is really a misnomer since if a woman has not yet delivered she is technically a "nullipara".

    A woman who comes in as a G1 P0, and then delivers, is also still considered a G1 P0 until after discharge.
    She becomes a G1P1 the second she delivers.
    But you are right in that if she's G1P0, she's still a nullipara and a primigravida.
  13. by   RNmama05
    Quote from Arwen_U
    She becomes a G1P1 the second she delivers.

    We do not calculate the current delivery in the parity since the point of TPAL is to document a woman's history. We do not change her records during the course of the hospitalization.
  14. by   ElvishDNP
    But if you are documenting the TPAL after delivery, then why wouldn't you count the baby she's just delivered in her history? I'm not arguing with you, just trying to understand how thing are done where you are.

    Say someone comes to us G2P1 in labor, then we document she's G2P1. After she delivers we document that she's a G2P2 now. And we do the TPAL accordingly as well.
    Last edit by ElvishDNP on Dec 12, '07

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