L&D 1st clinical rotation...help

  1. I just started OB & my clinical rotation is L&D. We have not covered that yet & I am trying to read to see what I need to know/do. If ya'll could give me some tips, areas to work on, what I need to know Before/After I get there I would really appreciate it.Thank You! CRB
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    About crb613

    Joined: Feb '04; Posts: 1,715; Likes: 542

    25 Comments

  3. by   NewEnglandRN
    I start my L&D rotation next week and I'd love to know too
  4. by   UTRN2005
    Same here.
  5. by   head injury unit RN
    most important thing i remember from my rotation years ago was"bubble he"---b=breasts u=uterus b=bowel b=bladder l=lochia(discharge) e=episotomy h=homan's sign e=epidural. this is your assessment if you check these things on your post partum patients your on your way !!! good luck students it will probably be one of your nicest rotations.
  6. by   FrumDoula
    Let me share my thoughts what nursing students should know that they may not be able to always read in a textbook:

    1. Please know that this day is one of the most enduring in a woman's memory. She will remember smells, sounds, comments, facial expressions, and touch. EVERYTHING. Women in their 80's have told accounts of their childbirth experiences that were replete with detail. Women go through major changes in terms of self concept, depending on their birth experience. It can be a chance for major empowerment or an oppurtunity for trauma.

    The gentle touch you give (instead of simply watching the machines that go ping), the kind and compassionate words of encouragment you give, will remain with her forever. Sensitivity is everything. A woman must know that she is respected in your eyes, and that you will help to preserve her memory of that day. In other words, BIRTH MATTERS.

    2. Brush up on basic labor support techniques. There are some wonderful books out there. Women remember not the machines so much as the cool washcloth that is used to cool their forehead.

    3. If you can, see birth in a variety of settings. Hospitals are not the only place to have a baby, and you can learn a lot by watching a midwife or doctor outside the hospital setting.

    4. Please also remember that if Dad is there, that it is a tremendous time for him, too. He is becoming a father, and should not be expected to play super coach. He may be frightened and confused, and I find that it's necessary to watch over him, too. Make sure he's had a little something to eat and drink. If he's not sure what to do, give him a task and praise him. He'll be so grateful!

    5. Treat the baby with tenderness and a bit of awe. A new human being, just arrived on planet Earth, is worthy of such awe!

    So there you have it .... thoughts from a doula and birth fanatic.

    Good luck during your clinicals. Birth is the most extraordinary of miracles ....

    Alison

    PS. And one last thing: PIZZAS ARE DELIVERED, BABIES ARE BORN. (Just a little nudging about medical terminology. I'm a little sick of seeing certain caregivers act like they're the stars of the show instead of the brave mother who births her baby. )
  7. by   BETSRN
    Quote from crb613
    I just started OB & my clinical rotation is L&D. We have not covered that yet & I am trying to read to see what I need to know/do. If ya'll could give me some tips, areas to work on, what I need to know Before/After I get there I would really appreciate it.Thank You! CRB
    Instead of asking for pointers here, just do the assignments that your instructor gives you. That will be a good base. None of us can give you good accurate suggestions. There is too much to include.

    When you are on clinical, just try to get all the experiences you can. See as many births as you can, try and pick a diverse group pf patients every week so that you get to see as many different scenarios as possible.

    Good luck!
  8. by   WhatToDo
    BETSRN-

    Almost everytime I read your posts to students or the "less experienced" I cringe. I think many of us would appreciate it if you could be a bit more positive.
  9. by   ndsweetheart
    I am a senior nursing student and did my OB/L&D rotation as a junior. The most important things I can tell you guys is to know your assessments! Also, always use the "Golden Rule" I was pregnant with my first child while in my rotation and I kept in mind how I would want the nurses to treat me when I went into labor.
    FrumDoula is right on with her post! I remember so much of the nurses behavior from my own labor and birth.
    Good luck and enjoy yourselves! I thought it was the best rotation. I fact I liked it so much that I have secured a job in LDRP upon my graduation in May.
    Learn all you can! There are a lot of experieces that you can get in on.
  10. by   crb613
    Quote from WhatToDo
    BETSRN-

    Almost everytime I read your posts to students or the "less experienced" I cringe. I think many of us would appreciate it if you could be a bit more positive.
    Thanks for the support, That is exactly the reason I was asking I have no assignment just do L&D. If I knew what to do/expect I would not be asking.Hopefully when I get to L&D I will have someone like you ask & gain experience from. Thanks
  11. by   Jolie
    [QUOTE=FrumDoula]Let me share my thoughts what nursing students should know that they may not be able to always read in a textbook:


    5. Treat the baby with tenderness and a bit of awe. A new human being, just arrived on planet Earth, is worthy of such awe!

    Birth is the most extraordinary of miracles ....

    Alison



    I love how you said that. And I couldn't agree more. Thanks for sharing!
  12. by   BETSRN
    Quote from WhatToDo
    BETSRN-

    Almost everytime I read your posts to students or the "less experienced" I cringe. I think many of us would appreciate it if you could be a bit more positive.
    Why do you cringe? I have been a nurse for 20 years and have precepted both new hires and many many students. I am on your side. I want to see ALL new nurses get as much experience as they can so they can look back and love nursing as much as I do 20 years after they start. Get as much hands-on experience as you can while you are students so that when you are out there on your own, you don't have as much new guy stress as the next person. Why do you think you read the volumes of posts about burn out? It's a combination of poor staffing levels (which is a bit of a reality right now) and the fact that students do NOT get the vast amounts of clinical that they used to get.

    I don't know what you see as negative in my comment about getting all the diverse experiences that you can while you are a student. Maybe you could expand on your comment.
  13. by   crb613
    Quote from BETSRN
    Why do you cringe? I have been a nurse for 20 years and have precepted both new hires and many many students. I am on your side. I want to see ALL new nurses get as much experience as they can so they can look back and love nursing as much as I do 20 years after they start. Get as much hands-on experience as you can while you are students so that when you are out there on your own, you don't have as much new guy stress as the next person. Why do you think you read the volumes of posts about burn out? It's a combination of poor staffing levels (which is a bit of a reality right now) and the fact that students do NOT get the vast amounts of clinical that they used to get.

    I don't know what you see as negative in my comment about getting all the diverse experiences that you can while you are a student. Maybe you could expand on your comment.
    "Instead of asking for pointers here, just do the assignments that your instructor gives you. That will be a good base. None of us can give you good accurate suggestions. There is too much to include".
    I think this comment was the reason for the "cringe". I too felt the same way when I read it. I realize there is alot to know/do & no one can just sum it up in a few words. I was looking for advice from an experienced nurses as to things I might be able to do to be helpful & not overstep my clinical bounds but, also to be hands on & learn at the same time.I want to do any & everything I can to gain experience, to provide great care while at the same time not interfere with you as you do your job.The bottom line is I am there to learn & provide the best care I can, I was just trying to borrow real life knowledge to help me do it more efficiently.I am sure you are a great nurse & I did not intend to cause any waves. Thanks CRB
  14. by   SmilingBluEyes
    I posted this to a student having trouble w/difficult RNs in clinical rotations. It does not really repeat all the wonderful advice here, just a bit more to expound on. Yes, some RNs can be really tough and mean.....most of us try to help you make the most out of your clinical experiences, be they occur in Med-Surg, ICU, OB, ED or other areas.

    I truly hope you enjoy your OB clinicals. I did like mine, even though they were rushed and short of duration compared to med-surg. I just want to again welcome and wish all students the BEST in their schooling and future careers!

    Here is my post at the other thread:

    I am so sorry you are encountering this. I did in some of my clinicals, too. A lot of what they say about being overworked and understaffed is so true, but no excuse to treat students poorly. All you can do is resolve these things:

    1. not to take it personally! Learn this one well, as you will need it when you are a nurse. Believe me.

    2. report TRUE abuses to your instructors...no one deserves to be out and out abused by any other.

    3. do not enter the unit "entitled", meaning, be willing to do your OWN research, fact-finding, lab reading, leg work, etc. Don't ask a busy charge nurse or primary nurse for things you can find or do yourself. (I know this is common sense, but I have learned common sense is not always that "common"). And be willling if you have an extra minute to help out anyway you can. Don't be afraid to offer to help do things like water passes/bed changes runs to lab, etc. IF your instructors permit. WE will be ETERNALLY GRATEFUL. NO that is not what you are there to learn and do, I know--- but if you DO have a minute, please try. It does make all the difference.

    4. Remember those who DO treat you well and emulate them. Remember those who did not, and resolve never to be like them.

    5. Enjoy school while you can. It's not "greener" on the "other side" always. Enjoy that safety net of your instructors while you have it and learn all you can while you are in school. Take every opportunity to grow.

    6. Remember, nothing is forever, even nursing school. It WILL end and you WILL be a nurse one day and you WILL be able to look back on all of this and learn from it.

    (((gentle hugs))) To ALL students here.
    __________________

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