Interviewing potential staff nurses

  1. Ladies (and gents), I need a little help please.
    I've been asked to be on an interviewing committee and next week we will be interviewing six nurses for 2 Labor and Delivery positions.

    I know two of the candidates; they worked on our unit previously.

    I'd like some advice on what to ask. Thoughtful questions that will help us really choose "the best".

    Any ideas are greatly appreciated! Thanks in advance~
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    About midwife2b

    Joined: May '05; Posts: 263; Likes: 11

    10 Comments

  3. by   ERNurse752
    I've had a few interviews lately, so I'm going on that...

    Why do you want to work L/D?
    Why do you want to work at this facility?
    What is your greatest strength?
    What is your greatest weakness?
    Why are you leaving your current position?

    I know those are generic, but it's a start.

    I also like it when an interview includes the interviewee being able to shadow a nurse on the unit for a good part of the shift...lets them get a feel for the unit, and lets the current staff assess how that person might fit in.

    Good luck!
  4. by   Jolie
    Why are you leaving your current position?

    Give an example of a time that you performed well under stress.

    Give an example of how you have advocated for a patient in a stressful situation.

    Give an example of how you have contributed to a team effort on your current unit.

    Are you willing to take on the necessary certifications (ACLS, NRP, fetal monitoring) in the time frame allowed.
  5. by   mandrews
    My first interview made me interview them. talk about being put on the spot.

    melissa
  6. by   daisybaby
    Find out what they can bring to the unit- what does each RN feel she is an expert, or resource for? Every nurse sould be a 'go-to' person for al least aspect of OB/GYN nursing.

    Also, make sure you choose someone who has a life outside the hospital. Of course you can't ask personal/age/family questions, but do look for someone who enjoys some sort of hobby/activity outside of patient care or public service. Nurses who take time for themselves outside of work are happier nurses when they ARE at work
  7. by   Jessy_RN
    Not a nurse, but I do want to wish you the best of luck
  8. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Be sure to ask if THEY have any questions or comments for you. You can tell a LOT about a person by how he or she answers that one question!!!!

    Also what are his/her long and short-term goals? Another good question that tells you a bit about where a person's mind is.

    Open ended questions are really good to ask, if you can.
  9. by   amber1142
    Quote from midwife2b
    Ladies (and gents), I need a little help please.
    I've been asked to be on an interviewing committee and next week we will be interviewing six nurses for 2 Labor and Delivery positions.

    I know two of the candidates; they worked on our unit previously.

    I'd like some advice on what to ask. Thoughtful questions that will help us really choose "the best".

    Any ideas are greatly appreciated! Thanks in advance~
    I would avoid grilling people with a lot of predetermined questions. If you catch people unawares they may stammer and end up looking foolish, and that's unfortunate. I'd say ask one or two open-ended questions like "why do you want to work here?" or "why do you want to work L&D?", and then let them take it from there. People who are enthusiastic will show it by the questions they ask. My own interview ended up being an hour-long conversation about all kinds of things; I think we both enjoyed it.
  10. by   NurseNora
    One question I was asked at my last interview was, "What should I know about you that we haven't covered yet?"
  11. by   midwife2b
    Thanks to all who helped with this. The interviews are this afternoon... and after three very stressful work days your comments were very helpful!
  12. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Quote from mandrews
    My first interview made me interview them. talk about being put on the spot.

    melissa

    Try being interviewed by a team of CHARGE NURSES----

    that is being put on the spot. I was very intimidated---for about 3 seconds. Then I remembered, I did not HAVE to work there, either.

    That is why I say, HAVE QUESTIONS of YOUR OWN READY.

    You CAN interview them, too, to see if they are a good fit for YOU.

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