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Nursing Student Looking for Niche in Nursing World

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lissy1214 has 5 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in PICU, General Pediatrics, Pediatric Heme-Onc.

957 Profile Views; 13 Posts

Hello all :) I'm currently a senior year nursing student, set to graduate this May.

I'm trying to find my niche within the nursing world but have been unsuccessful thus far. I'm wondering if some of you more experienced folks can gain a sense for what I'm interested in and give me suggestions as to what type of nursing I might like to pursue.

A little bit about me: I chose to major in nursing not because it was a passion of mine but because my mother (a NICU nurse and single mom) pressured me into it. Had it been truly up to me, I would have pursued a writing or music degree.

I have always been an excellent student and glided through nursing school with ease. Clinicals have been somewhat of a struggle for me though because that's where I really see how much I dislike nursing (especially compared to other students who approach clinical with such enthusiasm).

All in all, I am certain that traditional floor nursing is a poor fit for me. My personality and natural abilities do not line up with what traditional nursing consists of. I don't like hospitals, I don't like completing medical tasks (suctioning trachs, administering tube feedings, changing dressings, etc.), I don't like catering to patients' needs for the entirety of a 12-hour shift and I don't like the lack of autonomy. (Just because nursing isn't the best fit for me does not mean that I don't respect what nurses do. I think nurses are very incredible, caring individuals and it takes a lot of dedication to do what they do.)

That being said, there are many things I do like !

I like writing, music and art.

I like to design and draw.

I like working with children and women.

I like the pursuit of social justice and fighting for causes I'm passionate about.

I like problem-solving and utilizing my creativity.

I like flexibility and non-routine work environments.

I like to call the shots - I'm not one for following instructions.

I like brainy endeavors that require thinking rather than physical, hands-on endeavors that require doing (i.e. solving problems rather than completing tasks).

I am an INFJ according to Myers-Briggs typology.

Based on my interests and abilities, I've been thinking that public health nursing might be an appropriate fit for me but I'm just not sure. I've also considered case management.

What do you guys think about public health nursing ?

What other fits within the nursing world do you think would be appropriate ?

If you do not see me within the nursing world at all, what kind of graduate degree should I pursue instead ? (I will graduate with a Bachelor's of Science in Nursing.)

Thank you so much for your input - I am in desperate need of it !!

Sincerely,

EMS

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48 Posts; 2,171 Profile Views

I hold the answer to the question you are longing an answer for. Listen carefully. Here it is. The answer is, "You chose the wrong profession". Simply put. You've probably been constantly thinking about this question for months to years. You are tired about not having an answer. You need to look in the mirror and admit it. Most importantly, you need to tell your mom the real reason why you are unhappy with your career choice. Nursing is a field that involves patient care and taking care of people. Everyone I know that went into nursing, started at the bedside. Most wanted the hospital. The alternative would be rehab or a nursing home and both of those involve a lot more work. Hospital also tends to pay more. Nursing involves taking care of people over yourself. Meaning putting your body and mind on the line for others you don't even know. Your philosophy on what your looking for clashes with what nursing involves. Your interests are completely different from healthcare. You must of realized this during your clinicals. Yes, bedside nursing is indeed tough and not for many. This is why the turnover rate in nursing is 1 in 3 by two years post-graduation. Many realize it when it's too late. I don't entirely blame them. Waking up 5am in the morning, standing on your feet for 12 hours, don't even have time to take a break, and all the stress and responsibility can be quite overwhelming, esp. for a new grad. You should consider cutting your losses and pursuing what you really want to do. Or, you can finish, suck it up, and hope you can find an area you would like to work in, but regardless of the area, nursing involves lives, so most areas will involve a degree of stress and responsibility. Areas outside of the bedside also usually require 2-5 years of floor experience. The strongest kicker as you admitted it, you were pressured to go into nursing. Time to wake up, smell the coffee and tell mommy how you really feel. But most importantly, you have to do what you feel is right, your older now, wiser, you know what you really want, and i can tell you from a mile away it's not nursing. You don't want anything that has to do with science or healthcare. You want to compose music, teach it, maybe you want to be a historian, a psychologist, or a teacher of fine arts. All great areas i think are worth investigating. Good luck young warrior.

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lissy1214 has 5 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in PICU, General Pediatrics, Pediatric Heme-Onc.

13 Posts; 957 Profile Views

While I would have to agree with you that nursing isn't a great profession for me (it's something I've known since joining the program unfortunately), I feel there's got to be something within the nursing world I'd enjoy.

I think it ultimately makes sense for me to pursue a graduate degree in something other than nursing. For the time being though, I will have to work as a nurse in some capacity. So I'm trying to find some kind of nursing work that suits my abilities.

I've heard it said many times "There are so many different kinds of nursing, you'll find something you like - you could work in a hospital, a clinic, a school, with any age group, etc"

You know ?

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missmollie has 4 years experience as a ADN, BSN, RN and specializes in Neuroscience.

867 Posts; 14,379 Profile Views

You can be a nurse and write, and trust me, you don't need an English degree to be a writer. Unfortunately, no one here is going to have the answer you are looking for. It will take you deciding what's going to be best for you.

Check out the specialty forums and read about what each specialty does. I'm sorry that you've wasted time for a degree that you ultimately didn't want, but I hope you find it leads you to where you want to be.

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48 Posts; 2,171 Profile Views

EMS, all these areas you mentioned involve direct-patient care. It's all the same stress, just a different environment, you'll be taking care of people. My question to you is, do you enjoy this type of work? Here's a good assessment tool? Do you enjoy wiping bottoms, hearing people complain?, do you like dealing with emergencies? Do you like dealing with people, do you enjoy emptying their foley's? Do you like stress? do you like 12 hr shifts? do you like the hospital environment? if you answered no to at least 1/2 of these questions, i would stare at a mirror for a bit. Take a good hard look? what do you see yourself as? a person wearing scrubs? or a suit and tie? maybe you see yourself playing a guitar? or sitting at a desk? Maybe you see yourself as a politician. It won't be easy to obtain employment outside the math, sciences, and business fields, but at least you'll be pursuing something you truly can enjoy and be proud of. Let me tell you a quick story. Steve went to nursing school. Hated clinicals. Sight and smell of wiping butt infuriated him. Steve dropped out and is now a successful accountant. Never doubted his decision. Steve is a good friend. The End.

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17 Posts; 768 Profile Views

lissy1214,

i was searching to find some more information about specialties in nursing and i stumbled across your post. i'm really curious as to what you've decided to do as i also am a nursing student who is also an INFJ (such a rare type!). contrary to you, however, this is my second degree and i personally chose to follow this route after volunteering at my local hospital for about a year. if you don't mind, perhaps you can PM me? i really do hope things worked out for you in the end!

looking forward to hearing from you --

happymochi

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