Will it matter that I have a non-nursing B.S.? - page 3

I will be graduating with my B.S. in Health Care Admin., and planning to go into an ADN program afterwards. Will it matter that my B.S. is not in nursing? I would have preferred to get my B.S.N or... Read More

  1. by   AZ_LPN_8_26_13
    Quote from pnoble198
    Any bachelor's degree is an asset. When you do become a RN and decide to pursue your MSN, you will need to take bridge courses (usually 3 courses) to bridge your way in to the MSN program. Once you have taken those 3 classes and started your MSN degree, you will be the same as the BSN graduate in the MSN program.

    As a RN, your bachelor's degree will only help - not hurt.

    Good luck!
    This is the route I'm taking..... I am going after my ADN to become an RN. I already have a bachelor's degree - in a management field actually. I'm not really that interested in healthcare management though - more interested in actual patient care, but I plan on taking bridge classes and going straight to MSN myself, while I work as an RN. I agree - having a BS degree, even if it's not in nursing, will still help.
  2. by   greenbaby
    I just graduated an ADN program in NJ at a college that is very well respected for its nursing program and my anatomy courses were I think 20 years old. I was in the healthcare field prior to switching career to nursing so maybe that had something to do with them accepting the credits. I can't see why if you had anatomy 5 years ago that would be a problem. And why couldn't you just take a challenge test instead of taking the courses over.
  3. by   MaritesaRN
    Quote from maggie24
    I will be graduating with my B.S. in Health Care Admin., and planning to go into an ADN program afterwards. Will it matter that my B.S. is not in nursing?

    I would have preferred to get my B.S.N or even go to an entry-level Master's, but my my Anatomy will be 5 yrs old by the time I graduate, so I will have to take it over to even qualify for these programs. I chose to stop pursuing the B.S.N route b/c of how impacted it is, and I am on wait lists (2-3 yrs) for 2 ADN programs, so I am finishing my degree while I wait. I will be graduating spring 2010; N.S. fall 2010.

    I am just wondering what impact my B.S. degree will have once I graduate N.S.?
    Do employers look at non-nursing degrees in addition to an R.N., or is it ignored b/c it is not a B.S. in Nursing?
    Would it be better to use my B.S. as a stepping-stone into an entry-level M.S.N.?

    p.s. I have also contemplated re-taking my Anat. so that I can apply to entry-level MSN, but I am fearful of the impaction of these programs b/c of my experience with B.S.N programs. I am leaning towards taking the "safe" route and going to the ADN program so that I don't have to keep waiting and potentially get again.

    Oh, and I just really want to be a nurse!:heartbeat

    Any advice would be greatly appreciated!



    I too have a BS , but not in nursing. Some employer and other faclilities will require a BSN. this is really more if you want a managerial work ( of which I am not interested) . Considering the requirements of higher education, you will be better off if you go straight to masters, since you already have a bachelor degree......why waste money for a BSN when you can get the masters? they have different tracks on this.....of which makes sense , since why would you want to have 2 bachelors? Sometimes I feel the BSN is over rated....the curriculum differences are more of some management courses , and public health curriculum. But if higher education is what employers want , then go for you MSN, not BSN. good luck. Nursing is so diversed nowadays , and there ares so many areas that you can go.
  4. by   ElphabaRN
    From what I know, and my experience:

    1) I had a BA in zoology that I received in 1998. It helped me greatly in getting into my BSN program.
    2) My physiology course/learning, was older than dirt, by the time I started applying to nursing schools, so while I was waiting it out, I retook it (although, had to foot all the bill), raised my grade incredibly, and I think that it was this dramatic improvement that also helped my case for getting into nursing school.
    3) It seems, at least around here, that all managers already have their masters, or else they are working on it. True, you may find a small rural hospital that has an ADN as a manager, but as someone else stated, the Magnet program will be eliminating this as an option, as of 2013.
    4) I am also wondering, how a bachelor's in healthcare admin will help, in terms of getting an admin job. I never knew that there were bachelor's degrees for this actually. As for the specifics about obtaining a management position down the road, I think, a facility will require that you have taken the extra courses/hours to go from the ADN to the BSN, prior to any type of nursing management.
  5. by   MaritesaRN
    Quote from daretolive
    From what I know, and my experience:

    1) I had a BA in zoology that I received in 1998. It helped me greatly in getting into my BSN program.
    2) My physiology course/learning, was older than dirt, by the time I started applying to nursing schools, so while I was waiting it out, I retook it (although, had to foot all the bill), raised my grade incredibly, and I think that it was this dramatic improvement that also helped my case for getting into nursing school.
    3) It seems, at least around here, that all managers already have their masters, or else they are working on it. True, you may find a small rural hospital that has an ADN as a manager, but as someone else stated, the Magnet program will be eliminating this as an option, as of 2013.
    4) I am also wondering, how a bachelor's in healthcare admin will help, in terms of getting an admin job. I never knew that there were bachelor's degrees for this actually. As for the specifics about obtaining a management position down the road, I think, a facility will require that you have taken the extra courses/hours to go from the ADN to the BSN, prior to any type of nursing management.


    Interesting to know about the magnet program.........so if an experience ADN that worked and have oddles of experience in the hospital ---- will be outbooted by a fresh RN w/ a BSN? Some employers will accept the experience in lieu of the BSN, realistically, experience makes sense in comparison to texbook knowledge--------both is good , but this is not the common scene at this time. Who owns the magnet program ? I can see the purpose of JHACO, but I need to research this magnet program.............
  6. by   83studentnurse
    Magnet hospitals need 1/2 of their nurses to have BSNs. Clearly, this means BSN prepared nurses have some advantage, but half the jobs are still open for anyone. A lot of the hospitals around me either have acquired or are going for Magnet status. I haven't heard of anyone being fired and replaced by a BSN nurse, but I do know some places will say "BSN preferred" for all jobs. I still hear of lots of ADNs being hired for those jobs, though. In most cases, experience and skill still trump the credentials.
  7. by   elkpark
    Lots of hospitals, Magnet or not, are going (or have already gone) to minimum-BSN for management positions. 17 years ago, I was in a BSN-completion program with a sizeable group of NMs from the local hospital -- administration had told them that they either had to go finish a BSN or give up their management position. I don't know if anyone just opted to step down from their position (obviously, that person would not have been in classes with me ), but a whole bunch of them schlepped down to the local uni and signed up for the BSN-completion program (against their will, and they let everyone around them know this in no uncertain terms -- they were a v. negative influence in the classes, IMHO).
  8. by   Supasoldja
    Quote from maggie24
    I will be graduating with my B.S. in Health Care Admin., and planning to go into an ADN program afterwards. Will it matter that my B.S. is not in nursing?

    I would have preferred to get my B.S.N or even go to an entry-level Master's, but my my Anatomy will be 5 yrs old by the time I graduate, so I will have to take it over to even qualify for these programs. I chose to stop pursuing the B.S.N route b/c of how impacted it is, and I am on wait lists (2-3 yrs) for 2 ADN programs, so I am finishing my degree while I wait. I will be graduating spring 2010; N.S. fall 2010.

    I am just wondering what impact my B.S. degree will have once I graduate N.S.?
    Do employers look at non-nursing degrees in addition to an R.N., or is it ignored b/c it is not a B.S. in Nursing?
    Would it be better to use my B.S. as a stepping-stone into an entry-level M.S.N.?

    p.s. I have also contemplated re-taking my Anat. so that I can apply to entry-level MSN, but I am fearful of the impaction of these programs b/c of my experience with B.S.N programs. I am leaning towards taking the "safe" route and going to the ADN program so that I don't have to keep waiting and potentially get again.

    Oh, and I just really want to be a nurse!:heartbeat

    Any advice would be greatly appreciated!
    It does not matter. I have a BS in Business Administration, an ADN, and a MBA. The bottom line is that a hospital is a business and they want a person who can read the bottom line (profit and loss statements) your degree in Public Health Administration will be fine. Go for an ADN, then get your MBA. You will go far.
  9. by   Valerie Salva
    Quote from daytonite
    a bsn is required for supervision and management nursing positions......
    no, it isn't.
    most nurse unit managers i've had have been aas nurses, two have been diploma nurses.
    this has been recently.

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