Be very Careful about considering Excelsior's Online ADN program... - page 3

:uhoh3: Be very careful before you sign up for the Excelsior program if you plan on working in a major metropolitan hospital or even a larger hospital in a rural area. I know of two people here... Read More

  1. by   Nurse_Ben
    Hey all,

    I will get my RN this coming may. I am planning to go the ec route because i will already have 160+ credit hours of undergrad (including adn) under my belt. Anyone here of any problems with this? Since I will have my RN from a accredited school, should I worry about having a BSN from EC?

    -Benny
  2. by   chip193
    Quote from ColoLPNStudent


    Be very careful before you sign up for the Excelsior program if you plan on working in a major metropolitan hospital or even a larger hospital in a rural area.
    I know of two people here in Colorado that have had problems with their Excelsior education. One spent over $5,000, passed the Colorado NCLEX and has found that major hospitals will not hire her because of the lack of additional clinical hours and real-time instruction. The second stopped taking the course after spending more than $3,000 after finding out the same information.

    I signed up last April and immediately after had the RN that had taught my CNA class the year before tell me that many hospitals have problems with these types of degrees. I had already bought a bunch of books, but basically left it where it stood thinking I could always get my money back. Boy was I wrong.

    I was using the istudysmart.com system to get some of the classes out of the way for Excelsior and when I wanted to get a refund, I was shocked at what I heard. If you do not request a refund within 3 days of signing up, you're out of luck. No refunds period. Am I glad I only spent $800 plus another $200 on books.

    So...my advice is to try and get into the second year of an ADN program at a community college if you're an LPN (which in most states has a very small waiting list as compared to entering into it in the first year). If you're a CMA, Paramedic or whatever Excelsior currently says qualifies you for the RN-ADN program, do what it takes to get into a real-time, nursing school. I have heard three stories besides my own now and would council anyone seeking to become a nurse to seek other options than online programs. It may take me longer, but it will be better in the long run.
    (1) You need to research your marketplace before you do anything. I'm a EC ADN grad and had three ER job offers in my area before graduation.

    (2) You used one of the publishing companies. EC tells you basically not to use them. That would be your second error.

    (3) EC actually has offices in the hospitals here to get folks into the ADN and BSN programs with the hospitals paying the bill. Seems to me that the problem is in your particular area - not the the college.

    Chip
  3. by   chip193
    Quote from hippienurse
    I agree.

    I cannot believe people are allowed to learn nursing online, it just doesn't seem right to me. (Sorry if this upsets anyone, it is just my opinion)
    I watched someone make a statement like this at work the other day. She didn't know that her preceptor was a Regents External Degree grad (that was the name of EC long ago).

    Gee, that really made her look dumb.

    Anyway, are you aware of the requirements of the program - prereq and in the program? I'll bet not. In the future, you may want to know a little about what you choose to criticize.

    Chip
  4. by   RN34TX
    I'm just glad that I'd never heard of this website when I was deciding on how to get my RN because I probably would have been steered the wrong way with all of the negative comments I've read about EC here.

    If I'd followed a lot of this "wisdom" on this website I'd probably still be in clinical rotations making beds, hanging IV meds, and passing pills, things I did as an LVN every day.

    I don't know where all of these places are that don't hire EC grads and have a bad attitude toward them because I've worked in 3 different parts of the country as an LVN/LPN and never once heard a bad word about EC. In fact on the East coast it seemed a very common way for LPN's to get their RN and EC was well known and that's where I got the idea.

    The only pattern I see is that a lot of these comments seem to come from CA, CO, and IL and I've never worked in any of those states.

    A couple of months ago, out of curiousity I posted my first and only OP asking if anyone worked with, precepted, supervised, etc. any EC grads and if there were any problems with them regarding competency, skills, etc. and if they lacked anything that was expected of a new RN.
    Not ONE person could come up with anything negative to say that actually worked with EC grads and yet so many people have all of these comments about how bad EC is and how state boards are either going to or should stop licensing them.

    Now when I read these comments I consider the source. A lot of opinion but no true knowledge or experience about what they are talking about.
    I try to stay active here so that people who are considering the program can actually have contact with real EC grads instead of these second hand stories from people who have "heard about" or "my friend or cousin who went to EC" because a lot of it is pure fiction.
  5. by   MtnMan
    As a 7 year navy corpsman I am friends with dozens of Reagents/EC grads. They welcome veterans, LPN/LVN's, and EMT-P's(paramedics). People with enough medical/nursing knowledge and most importantly life experience to comprehend and do well. Most EC grads I am sure have had more time in the field by the time they apply than a lot of administrative BSN or MSN's. Two people I currently work with are doing conversion to RN through EC, one a 12 year LPN, and the other a 16 year paramedic. They are both excelling in their course work and because of their discipline are ahead of EC's schedule for them. As for the lack of clinical time does a 16 year EMT-P that has worked on the street and in ED's need the same amount as a 20 year old that works at TGIFriday's? I think not. My employer wanted me to go through EC but I had been out of the field for 7 years so I chose to go the traditional route because I felt I needed the added instruction. I fully intend to do my Bachelor's through EC either in Nursing or Health Care Administration.
  6. by   Laurie888
    First of all, Excelsior is NOT an ONLINE program. It is a program that gathers up all your credits, gives you credits for exams, and a degree. Took all my old credits from nursing school (I went 3/4 of the way through). Its entrance requirements are pretty strict for nursing (you MUST have clinical experience), and it's clinical exam is very difficult which ensures that its graduates know their nursing, both theory and practice.

    Be careful about third-party companies, though. Most are probably not worth it, you can find the same information online for nothing.

    All in all, be careful anyway -- research your educational choices and don't judge any, positive or negative, based on one person's comments.
    Last edit by Laurie888 on Dec 25, '04
  7. by   traumaRUs
    This thread just reinforces the fact that as with any program for an LPN or RN - you need to check with your local board of nursing to ensure that it meets your state's requirements. No matter how we become nurses, we must stick together. Have a great day everyone!
  8. by   kesneysmom
    Quote from hippienurse
    I agree.

    I cannot believe people are allowed to learn nursing online, it just doesn't seem right to me. (Sorry if this upsets anyone, it is just my opinion)

    This is an insane statement. Most nurses of whatever status, learn skills ect in whatever area they are practicing in at the time. I have been an Lpn for 8 years my husband has been an RN for 9 years I am more educated with hands on skills. I know way to many RN'S that went through traditional schools that didnt know squat when they got out. It doesnt depend on the school it depends on the student.
  9. by   gonnanurse
    On several occasions on this website I have read abut students paying outside companies for help to get classes out of the way when doing Excelsior. I don't understand why.

    There are THOUSANDS of universities out there that let you enroll and take general education courses easily if you are not a degree seeking student. It can be done online, or through the external degree programs/non-traditional degree/degree completion programs. Some places let you take classes through correspondence vs online. Programs like this are available at reputable state universities for relatively low tution. The other option is registering for CLEP exams, buying a study guide on amazon.com and going from there.

    Obviously, this doesn't apply to the nursing courses. I just say beware of the middle man!

    You don't need anyone to "help" you get through the general education courses.

    Good luck.

    Quote from ColoLPNStudent


    Be very careful before you sign up for the Excelsior program if you plan on working in a major metropolitan hospital or even a larger hospital in a rural area.
    I know of two people here in Colorado that have had problems with their Excelsior education. One spent over $5,000, passed the Colorado NCLEX and has found that major hospitals will not hire her because of the lack of additional clinical hours and real-time instruction. The second stopped taking the course after spending more than $3,000 after finding out the same information.

    I signed up last April and immediately after had the RN that had taught my CNA class the year before tell me that many hospitals have problems with these types of degrees. I had already bought a bunch of books, but basically left it where it stood thinking I could always get my money back. Boy was I wrong.

    I was using the istudysmart.com system to get some of the classes out of the way for Excelsior and when I wanted to get a refund, I was shocked at what I heard. If you do not request a refund within 3 days of signing up, you're out of luck. No refunds period. Am I glad I only spent $800 plus another $200 on books.

    So...my advice is to try and get into the second year of an ADN program at a community college if you're an LPN (which in most states has a very small waiting list as compared to entering into it in the first year). If you're a CMA, Paramedic or whatever Excelsior currently says qualifies you for the RN-ADN program, do what it takes to get into a real-time, nursing school. I have heard three stories besides my own now and would council anyone seeking to become a nurse to seek other options than online programs. It may take me longer, but it will be better in the long run.
  10. by   gonnanurse
    Since you will be an RN, why risk going to EC for the RN to BSN? There are many reputable schools out there that let you do RN to BSN online for probably the same price or less than EC, and then you don't have to worry about whether or not your degree will be accepted. Just do a search for rn to bsn online on google and see how many programs come up.

    Quote from Nurse_Ben
    Hey all,

    I will get my RN this coming may. I am planning to go the ec route because i will already have 160+ credit hours of undergrad (including adn) under my belt. Anyone here of any problems with this? Since I will have my RN from a accredited school, should I worry about having a BSN from EC?

    -Benny
  11. by   chip193
    Quote from gonnanurse
    Since you will be an RN, why risk going to EC for the RN to BSN? There are many reputable schools out there that let you do RN to BSN online for probably the same price or less than EC, and then you don't have to worry about whether or not your degree will be accepted. Just do a search for rn to bsn online on google and see how many programs come up.
    The EC BSN (as well as the ADN) is well accepted here. It all depends on where you live.
  12. by   Sheri257
    Quote from traumaRUs
    This thread just reinforces the fact that as with any program for an LPN or RN - you need to check with your local board of nursing to ensure that it meets your state's requirements. No matter how we become nurses, we must stick together. Have a great day everyone!
    Actually, I'd take it a step further. Besides the BON, I'd call all of the local hospitals in my area and see if they hire EC grads. Find out first hand if they have a problem with the program or not.

  13. by   CarVsTree
    Quote from Nurse_Ben
    Hey all,

    I will get my RN this coming may. I am planning to go the ec route because i will already have 160+ credit hours of undergrad (including adn) under my belt. Anyone here of any problems with this? Since I will have my RN from a accredited school, should I worry about having a BSN from EC?

    -Benny
    I don't see where you would run into any problems. The people facing problems with hiring are EC-ADN's (and these are few and far between). Since you will already have your ADN through a traditional program you will not have any problems. It is the RN accreditation that can be problematic and again, I believe this is rare. I have a co-worker going through EC right now and I can tell you that her schooling is definitely more rigorous than mine, which is a traditional ADN program. Because EC is online, the clinical signoffs need to be more intense in order to prove that the work is being done as it should be.

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