Hospitals offer big bonuses, free housing and tuition to recruit nurses - page 2

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  1. by   Mr_Edwino
    Quote from OrganizedChaos
    Unaccredited degrees? It doesn't sound like you truly did your homework.

    I've taken the courtesy of linking an informative article written here on A.N. about an individual (and a large percentage of RNs) who have non-accredited degrees and the problems they encounter.


    http://allnurses.com/online-nursing-...ed-912463.html


    Also a peer article:
    "Earning a degree from an unaccredited school or program may prevent you from becoming licensed in certain [nursing]professions." -roseman.edu 2014


    Quote from OrganizedChaos
    On top of all of that not every LVN wants to bridge to become an RN. So there is no reason why hospitals shouldn't hire LVNs & do team nursing, as it would benefit everyone.
    The communal benefit of hiring more LVNs is not relevant to the topic. If there is a surplus of LVNs, hiring more of them would not help if there is a deficit of RNs in a particular facility. Simply put, it is a question of supply and demand.




    Reference
    Roseman.edu 2014
    Nursing School Accreditation Importance Explained
  2. by   AJJKRN
    Quote from Mr_Edwino
    I've taken the courtesy of linking an informative article written here on A.N. about an individual (and a large percentage of RNs) who have non-accredited degrees and the problems they encounter.


    http://allnurses.com/online-nursing-...ed-912463.html


    Also a peer article:
    "Earning a degree from an unaccredited school or program may prevent you from becoming licensed in certain [nursing]professions." -roseman.edu 2014



    The communal benefit of hiring more LVNs is not relevant to the topic. If there is a surplus of LVNs, hiring more of them would not help if there is a deficit of RNs in a particular facility. Simply put, it is a question of supply and demand.




    Reference
    Roseman.edu 2014
    Nursing School Accreditation Importance Explained
    You may want to reread your posts and the link you provided. An unaccredited nursing education can be obtained at any educational level, not just LPN or ADN/ASN. There are BSN and MSN programs that are unaccredited and there are NP programs that are unaccredited. What stats do you have that "many" ADN programs are unaccredited? What exactly does any of your argument have to do with hiring, and most importantly retaining bedside nurses, regardless of the nurse's educational level or the employor's wanted educational level? Supply and demand does not help with retention or attrition...now wages and maybe even sometimes working conditions...
  3. by   Mr_Edwino
    Quote from AJJKRN
    What exactly does any of your argument have to do with hiring, and most importantly retaining bedside nurses, regardless of the nurse's educational level or the employor's wanted educational level? Supply and demand does not help with retention or attrition...now wages and maybe even sometimes working conditions...
    I'm sorry you're having trouble understanding. That's my fault for not explaining it in a way that you can understand. You are correct in saying supply and demand does not help with retention, it actually works in reverse. It is more accurate to think of retention/attrition/wages as variables which affect the rate of the supply and demand of employees needed in a facility. Working conditions would would be an additional factor. These factors, as well as the surplus/deficit of employees in each respective level of nursing, affect the shortage/surplus in a facility.

    "Hospitals offer big bonuses, free housing and tuition to recruit nurses" as the title of the thread states, is an effort put forth by facilities in order to procure and retain personnel in response to these shortage factors, by promoting career advancement (tuition) and long term employment (free housing).





    Quote from AJJKRN
    You may want to reread your posts and the link you provided. An unaccredited nursing education can be obtained at any educational level, not just LPN or ADN/ASN. There are BSN and MSN programs that are unaccredited and there are NP programs that are unaccredited.
    If there are programs like this, I haven't heard of them.

    Quote from AJJKRN
    What stats do you have that "many" ADN programs are unaccredited?
    I don't know how many there are exactly, but there are numerous. I know of at least two in my own city. It's not anything that google would not be able to provide for you if you needed to compile a list.

    "Many of the new programs are at private for-profit schools that offer associate degrees. These schools don't have the waiting lists many community colleges have had to create because of demand. But many of these schools lack the accreditation that graduates need to get a bachelor's degree at local colleges and universities." -MCCN.edu

    -http://www.mccn.edu/news/in-the-news/297-nursing-grads-can-lack-credit
    Last edit by Mr_Edwino on Mar 11
  4. by   Mr_Edwino
    Quote from AJJKRN
    You may want to reread your posts and the link you provided.
    Actually, the links I provided reference ADN programs specifically...if you read them.
  5. by   AJJKRN
    Quote from Mr_Edwino
    I'm sorry you're having trouble understanding. That's my fault for not explaining it in a way that you can understand.(
    Ok. Well good luck in your education and ego, passing the NCLEX, and actually working as a nurse.
  6. by   Mr_Edwino
    Quote from AJJKRN
    Ok. Well good luck in your education and ego, passing the NCLEX, and actually working as a nurse.
    Yes, exactly the same to you.
  7. by   smartnurse1982
    I know what is going to happen.

    Those states with an Lpn shortage will start hiring medical assistants in their place(when they can).

    I dont know why it is so hard to hire an Rn for an Lpn position.
  8. by   smartnurse1982
    Quote from OrganizedChaos
    And hire LVNs to boot. Ain't nothing wrong with us!

    Lpn/Lvn have different scopes in different states.

    In Nj we could not hang blood,do an initial assessment,do a full comprehensive assessment,start IV's,replace an NGT,and write a nursing care plan.

    Some deregulation would need to take place I assume before an Lpn can work in acute care.

    But hospitals are probably using this fake shortage as an excuse to hire Bsn equivalent nurses from overseas.
  9. by   JKL33
    I realize that being quoted is not fun...things so often don't seem to appear in print the way they were actually spoken. That said,

    The American Nurses Association's Ross worries that rich bonuses and creative perks may not go far enough to retain nurses in the long run.

    "What's to stop nurses from accepting a job because of the perks and then hop to another hospital after two years because of their perks," she said.

    A better approach would be to invest in improving the work environment for nurses and offering better pay, career development and hours to help make sure they don't burn out, she said....
    God forbid nurses should "hop around" concerning themselves with money and trying to get ahead just a little. I'm certainly not a job-hopper but that's quite a haughty statement! It's not like those who gain these benefits because they are willing to work in a place that "for some unimaginable reason" no one else wants to should be made out to practically be villians.

    There are ways to stem the tide for these places that can't keep help. They don't want to try them.

    Hint: "Respect" would've been an excellent word for Ms. Ross to somehow finagle into her commentary. She does mention improving the work environment, but that's awfully vague.
  10. by   sharon23RN
    The main reason that it's hard to hire an RN for an LPN post is money. Most RN's do not want to work for LPN salary, unless it's a new grad looking for experience (as I once did).

    As for why hospitals don't hire LPN's..
    Where I live it's all about Magnet status. That means you must have a certain amount of BSN nurses including ADN's in BSN programs. So the hospital would rather pay for the RN to keep the Magnet status instead of drop the status and hire some LPN's. It's so sad because I worked with some awesome LPN's when I worked at a SNF. They gave me tips on time management and other things. But nursing is heading in the corporate direction. Our hospital just merged with a larger city hospital and we are now an "enterprise". ugh
  11. by   OrganizedChaos
    Quote from smartnurse1982
    Lpn/Lvn have different scopes in different states.

    In Nj we could not hang blood,do an initial assessment,do a full comprehensive assessment,start IV's,replace an NGT,and write a nursing care plan.

    Some deregulation would need to take place I assume before an Lpn can work in acute care.

    But hospitals are probably using this fake shortage as an excuse to hire Bsn equivalent nurses from overseas.
    That's why they do team nursing. You don't need as many RNs & then the RNs only need to do what the LVNs can't buy the LVNs can still do a LOT of the work.
  12. by   OrganizedChaos
    Quote from sharon23RN
    The main reason that it's hard to hire an RN for an LPN post is money. Most RN's do not want to work for LPN salary, unless it's a new grad looking for experience (as I once did).

    As for why hospitals don't hire LPN's..
    Where I live it's all about Magnet status. That means you must have a certain amount of BSN nurses including ADN's in BSN programs. So the hospital would rather pay for the RN to keep the Magnet status instead of drop the status and hire some LPN's. It's so sad because I worked with some awesome LPN's when I worked at a SNF. They gave me tips on time management and other things. But nursing is heading in the corporate direction. Our hospital just merged with a larger city hospital and we are now an "enterprise". ugh
    It's stupid. If hospitals wouldn't think that way & realize LVNs are such a benefit they wouldn't be in such dire need.
  13. by   OrganizedChaos
    Quote from Mr_Edwino
    I've taken the courtesy of linking an informative article written here on A.N. about an individual (and a large percentage of RNs) who have non-accredited degrees and the problems they encounter.


    http://allnurses.com/online-nursing-...ed-912463.html


    Also a peer article:
    "Earning a degree from an unaccredited school or program may prevent you from becoming licensed in certain [nursing]professions." -roseman.edu 2014



    The communal benefit of hiring more LVNs is not relevant to the topic. If there is a surplus of LVNs, hiring more of them would not help if there is a deficit of RNs in a particular facility. Simply put, it is a question of supply and demand.




    Reference
    Roseman.edu 2014
    Nursing School Accreditation Importance Explained
    You still don't know what you're talking about & it is so painfully obvious.

    So now there are a SURPLUS of LVNs?!

    If hospitals wouldn't worry about Magnet Status & hire ADN-RNs & LVNs (also do team nursing) this wouldn't be an issue. Team nursing is amazing. I know the scope of practice for LVNs vary from state to state but that's where the RN steps in & does whatever task needs to be done that the LVN can't do. I've done team nursing & it's amazing. I love it. So much more gets done.

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