Career path...?? MSN concentration?

  1. I am currently a BSN prepared Registered Nurse and am interested in getting a MSN. I am unsure of what concentration would leave me with the best options as my career progresses. I currently working in Perioperative Services and LOVE it. My ideal position would allow me to continue to work in the OR. I am back in forth on a MSN concentration in Education and Administration/Leadership. I would love to work as a Staff Development Coordinator or Nurse Educator but would also like to entertain the idea of being the Service Line Manager (Patient Care Manager) in Perioperative Services. I know many people transition between roles and often experience in a specific specialty can open many doors within itself.

    If I go the more "administrative/management" route in my education..will I still be a good candidate for Staff Development and Educator roles or should I go more for Education route and then with experience and advanced roles...eventually seek opportunities in management if I choose to? I don't want to limit myself because I am truly interested in both roles.
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  2. Visit sophie<3 profile page

    About sophie<3, BSN

    Joined: Nov '09; Posts: 307; Likes: 87
    RN; from US
    Specialty: 4 year(s) of experience

    5 Comments

  3. by   tampanurse2000
    Hello Sophie<3, In general, a MSN degree is definitely a competitive edge in terms of advancement within nursing specialties. IMO, MSN-nursing education emphasis will provide you with opportunites in management if you choose, because employers seek not only good managemnt skills/.experience, but someone who can present the goals, missions, objectives of the company to staff using proven teaching/demonstration techniques. My Opinion Anyway, good luck.
  4. by   HouTx
    Based on your post, it would seem that you're interested in workplace education rather than academia, right? If so, an MSN is going to be "necessary, but not sufficient" to achieve your goals. In order to move ahead in staff development, you'll need to acquire the knowledge & practical skills that come with solid experience - most of us began at the unit level &/or BLS Instructors.

    Our bag of tricks has to include things like: employment law (VERY important for staff development); instructional design; psychometrics; program evaluation; performance analysis; graphic design; . . . . in addition to business/operations basics such as: basic accounting; budget development; feasibility studies; staffing & productivity . . . Organizations are looking for Clinical Education leaders who can function as strategic leaders for this essential (and very expensive) function. It's complex and challenging, but I think it's the best job in healthcare.
  5. by   HouTx
    Based on your post, it would seem that you're interested in workplace education rather than academia, right? If so, an MSN is going to be "necessary, but not sufficient" to achieve your goals. In order to move ahead in staff development, you'll need to acquire the knowledge & practical skills that come with solid experience - most of us begin at the unit level &/or BLS Instructors.

    Our bag of tricks has to include things like: employment law (VERY important for staff development); instructional design; psychometrics; program evaluation; performance analysis; graphic design; . . . . in addition to business/operations basics such as: basic accounting; budget development; feasibility studies; staffing & productivity . . .

    Organizations are looking for Clinical Education leaders who can function as strategic leaders for this essential (and very expensive) function. It's complex and challenging, but I think it's the best job in healthcare.
  6. by   llg
    I am a Nursing Professional Development Specialist -- Nursing Professional Development (NPD) is the official specialty and certification for the staff development field. I think either MSN degree is OK for a staff development position -- because there are almost no programs of any kind that teach staff development content. Most people in staff development learn about the role through a combination of experience and continuing education (CE) courses. They get MSN's in a variety of fields, then supplement those MSN's with CE focusing on staff education. They get experience along the way by participating in education at the unit level.

    So in your case, I would recommend that you get the MSN that seems best for you without worrying about it too much. If that means something in Leadership or Management, that's OK. So is Nursing Education (which may focus exclusively on academic education and not staff education, depending on the school you choose) or even Nurse Practitioner or Clinical Specialist programs. Just be prepared to supplement your MSN with CE and experience in Nursing Professional Development.
  7. by   sophie<3
    Thank you all for your input! I think I am most interested in Staff Development...I am not interested in academia as I want to stay within the hospital setting. I *almost* accepted a position at a nearby hospital being an educator in the OR at it was an ideal position for me. But after the interview..I felt the role of the position wasn't cleraly defined. I only had 1.5 years in the OR and didn't feel this qualified me for the job..despite them offering it to me. But I feel the best option for me is an MSN in Education and then follow up with CEUs in Staff Development. What are your thoughts on a Post-MSN in Administration. Or any post-MSN certificate for that matter? Is this similar to the information CEUs would give me and is it worth my time? Are you happy with your Staff Development jobs? What is your favorite thing about it?

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