Confused!!!!!! What do I do

  1. Ok, this site has been very informative for me!! I need some advice

    I am a 24 yr old male who has a Bachelor of Business Admin in Management and IT and I am working on my MBA which I will finish in 2 semesters.

    My under gpa was not that good. But I am strongly thinking about nursing. It is one of few professions where I can be guaranteed a job and know I will be challenged each day.

    Should I persue an ASN or ADN in Nursing or BSN in Nusing or is it possible for me to go directly to a masters in Nursing?

    There is one school near me that offers the LPN in 3 semesters and then you can go from LPN to RN in one year. So it would take pretty much 1 yr to get both LPN and RN. Is this a smart thing?

    I am hoping the MBA would be beneficial for me in this career. I want to eventually get into management but not sure what the job market is for that in nursing or maybe become an educator in nursing

    Please help me! I work in IT and dont like it ..Im just hoping my under gpa wont come back to haunt me. I was thinking of beginning pre reqs once I finish my MBA
  2. Visit 2bnurseguy_2005 profile page

    About 2bnurseguy_2005

    Joined: Jun '05; Posts: 194; Likes: 1

    11 Comments

  3. by   billlee2
    Quote from nurseguy_2005
    Ok, this site has been very informative for me!! I need some advice

    I am a 24 yr old male who has a Bachelor of Business Admin in Management and IT and I am working on my MBA which I will finish in 2 semesters.

    My under gpa was not that good. But I am strongly thinking about nursing. It is one of few professions where I can be guaranteed a job and know I will be challenged each day.

    Should I persue an ASN or ADN in Nursing or BSN in Nusing or is it possible for me to go directly to a masters in Nursing?

    There is one school near me that offers the LPN in 3 semesters and then you can go from LPN to RN in one year. So it would take pretty much 1 yr to get both LPN and RN. Is this a smart thing?

    I am hoping the MBA would be beneficial for me in this career. I want to eventually get into management but not sure what the job market is for that in nursing or maybe become an educator in nursing

    Please help me! I work in IT and dont like it ..Im just hoping my under gpa wont come back to haunt me. I was thinking of beginning pre reqs once I finish my MBA

    Dude, I'm totally in the same boat. I graduated with a 2.7 gpa undergrad.
    Here's what I've heard from a few different admissions officers. You MUST, ABSOLUTELY MUST, get A's, maybe a B+ once or twice, but a 3.6 or above is a must. I spoke with drexel, pitt,and holy family, and given the competitiveness of nursing these days, good grades must be a given. What im gonna do is kill myself for high grades and supplement that with workign in a hospital, maybe as nurses aid. YOU CAN DO IT.
  4. by   chris_at_lucas_RN
    Having completed a bachelors degree and holding an advanced degree demonstrates that you do have the intellectual ability. If your GPA improved in grad school, you can always suggest that you "grew up a bit" and now that you are more mature than you were then..... yada, yada, yada, you get where I'm going with this.

    What were your grades in your pre-reqs? (A&P I and II, Micro, Algebra) If you were good there, you probably won't have a problem.

    I don't think you'd have difficulty getting into LPN/LVN school with a bachelors /master's degree, but why would you want to? You are bascially talking about an RN in 5 or 6 semesters (counting the LPN program), when you can get an RN in four semesters at a community college, once you have your pre-reqs. Doesn't sound like the LVN to RN plan is the best solution.

    BSN's are often more attractive than ADN/ASN candidates, so you should consider checking into a BSN program where you get enough credit for your prior degrees that all you have to do is your nursing stuff.

    In any case, you are probably looking at two years--and you should plan to get the best credential you can.

    And I wouldn't count on being assured of a job--yeah, there's a shortage, but the best slots will always have competition, and with the influx of foreign nurses, there is more "supply" (if you subscribe to the supply and demand concept applied to employment dynamics).

    Hope this helps.... Good thread, great questions, good luck!
  5. by   2bnurseguy_2005
    Thanks ..your advice about the LPN route is true. I guess I would be 'cheating' myself by going for LPN....So Im guessing the BEST way if Im gonna do it is go for the BSN...I see some accelerated programs for ppl with 4 yr degrees already. I am thinking that maybe this would be best. So did you have a hard time looking for a job?

    Yeah I eventually want to get into healthcare management. I dont think I would like to be a bedside nurse for an entire career

    I am GRATEFUL for your advice!! Thank you so much. Well the nursing jobs seem to be more plentiful than some careers


    Quote from chris_at_lucas_RN
    Having completed a bachelors degree and holding an advanced degree demonstrates that you do have the intellectual ability. If your GPA improved in grad school, you can always suggest that you "grew up a bit" and now that you are more mature than you were then..... yada, yada, yada, you get where I'm going with this.

    What were your grades in your pre-reqs? (A&P I and II, Micro, Algebra) If you were good there, you probably won't have a problem.

    I don't think you'd have difficulty getting into LPN/LVN school with a bachelors /master's degree, but why would you want to? You are bascially talking about an RN in 5 or 6 semesters (counting the LPN program), when you can get an RN in four semesters at a community college, once you have your pre-reqs. Doesn't sound like the LVN to RN plan is the best solution.

    BSN's are often more attractive than ADN/ASN candidates, so you should consider checking into a BSN program where you get enough credit for your prior degrees that all you have to do is your nursing stuff.

    In any case, you are probably looking at two years--and you should plan to get the best credential you can.

    And I wouldn't count on being assured of a job--yeah, there's a shortage, but the best slots will always have competition, and with the influx of foreign nurses, there is more "supply" (if you subscribe to the supply and demand concept applied to employment dynamics).

    Hope this helps.... Good thread, great questions, good luck!
  6. by   KatieBell
    Before you completely change tracks, I'd strongly suggest that you get some experience working in health care. Jobs are plentiful for a reason. In our state, it's estimated that most new grads do not stay 5 years in the profession. There is a reason for that, because it is a difficult job at times, and can cause quite a lot of stress. Health care is one of the most regulated industries- and this regularly spills over to nursing.
    Accelerated programs are great, but more than one time recently I've met people from those programs who have said they felt "rushed" after graduation and not prepared (even though technically the clinical time is the same etc)...
    Could be that you really like nursing, and it is the thing for you, but before you commit to it, I'd really recommend you get some experience as a care-giver...get certified as a nurses aide, or a EMT-B...
  7. by   billlee2
    Quote from KatieBell
    Before you completely change tracks, I'd strongly suggest that you get some experience working in health care. Jobs are plentiful for a reason. In our state, it's estimated that most new grads do not stay 5 years in the profession. There is a reason for that, because it is a difficult job at times, and can cause quite a lot of stress. Health care is one of the most regulated industries- and this regularly spills over to nursing.
    Accelerated programs are great, but more than one time recently I've met people from those programs who have said they felt "rushed" after graduation and not prepared (even though technically the clinical time is the same etc)...
    Could be that you really like nursing, and it is the thing for you, but before you commit to it, I'd really recommend you get some experience as a care-giver...get certified as a nurses aide, or a EMT-B...
    whether he's a nurses aid or an emt, either way he's leaving corporate america so he might as well go into nursing. once youve left corporate america, it's unbelievably difficult to explain leaving and then reentering. one really doesnt have the luxury of getting some experience. you either do it or you dont.

    thats what i think at least.
  8. by   chris_at_lucas_RN
    Quote from KatieBell
    Before you completely change tracks, I'd strongly suggest that you get some experience working in health care. Jobs are plentiful for a reason. In our state, it's estimated that most new grads do not stay 5 years in the profession. There is a reason for that, because it is a difficult job at times, and can cause quite a lot of stress. Health care is one of the most regulated industries- and this regularly spills over to nursing.
    Accelerated programs are great, but more than one time recently I've met people from those programs who have said they felt "rushed" after graduation and not prepared (even though technically the clinical time is the same etc)...
    Could be that you really like nursing, and it is the thing for you, but before you commit to it, I'd really recommend you get some experience as a care-giver...get certified as a nurses aide, or a EMT-B...
    Nursing students often work as "nurse externs," which is like a nurse's aide but pays a little better and sometimes gives you the chance to do some nurse-y type tasks under close supervision.

    Plus, when the time comes, you've got a place that knows you, with staff you already can work with, and generally speaking a job waiting for you.

    Good luck!
  9. by   2bnurseguy_2005
    You stated I should get healthcare experience? So nursing has high turnover? Or is it best for me to shadow a nurse or soemthing like that?....


    Quote from chris_at_lucas_RN
    Nursing students often work as "nurse externs," which is like a nurse's aide but pays a little better and sometimes gives you the chance to do some nurse-y type tasks under close supervision.

    Plus, when the time comes, you've got a place that knows you, with staff you already can work with, and generally speaking a job waiting for you.

    Good luck!
  10. by   2bnurseguy_2005
    Quote from GRUGAN02
    whether he's a nurses aid or an emt, either way he's leaving corporate america so he might as well go into nursing. once youve left corporate america, it's unbelievably difficult to explain leaving and then reentering. one really doesnt have the luxury of getting some experience. you either do it or you dont.

    thats what i think at least.

    Did you leave corp America? Well, I find it hard for me to gain employment in Corp America..Seems nursing has alot of avenues to explore
  11. by   billlee2
    Quote from nurseguy_2005
    Did you leave corp America? Well, I find it hard for me to gain employment in Corp America..Seems nursing has alot of avenues to explore
    well, im planning on leaving. im workign as an accounting temp for a few months and then ill enter school full time this spring, to take my pre-reqs. hopefully by next fall ill be enrolled in an accelerated bsn program.
  12. by   purplemania
    you are going to need to talk to school advisors. I know that the Univ. of Texas in Austin offers an accelerated program for people with a degree in non-nursing areas to obtain a BSN. My thoughts would be if that is not available then get the ADN and you will be fine. I worked for a VP of nursing who had an ADN and MBA. Obviously she did not need the BSN.
  13. by   nursing 101
    [QUOTE=nurseguy_2005]
    Yeah I eventually want to get into healthcare management. I dont think I would like to be a bedside nurse for an entire career

    Why does everyone want to automatically be in management without even giving the bedside a chance? I mean I understand people have different wants and that nursing offers different avenues but I feel as though people just want to take up nursing just to get into "management". I am really not trying to be offensive. It's just that everyone in my class wanted to be in management. Like everyone wants to forget about the real patient care which is bedside nursing. Don't get me wrong I don't think people have to stay at the bedside forever because it isn't pleasant at times. But most students/people think that after a year or two they are going to land a management position because there is a shortage. I am all for advancement but I do think that we should try to put in our time just like most other careers. JMO...
    Again I am not trying to be offensive here! And I apoligize if I do sound so.

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