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Nurse Manager Hiring Questions

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Miss McK Miss McK (New) New

Hello everyone!

We will begin the hiring process for a new nurse manager on our 28-bed MICU unit. The staff RNs have been asked to participate in the interview process. They would like us to come up with questions for the prospective hires. This is a role reversal for most of us.

We have come up with generic interview questions. The basic who, what, where, and most important...why.

I am asking those of you out there, staff RNs and managers, for questions to ask. Questions that will be a bit more thought provoking and challenging for the candidates.

All suggestions welcome.

Thank you!

Been there,done that, ASN, RN

Has 33 years experience.

Been there , done that... man were we bamboozled. She turned out to be a nut job. Managers are masters at interviewing.

Why did you leave your last position?

Are you a leader or a manager? Give examples of each.

How will you support nursing?

How and when do you discipline nursing?

What plans to you have to improve the unit if you are hired?

Good luck, let us know how it went.

HouTx, BSN, MSN, EdD

Specializes in Critical Care, Education. Has 35 years experience.

Recommend you utilize behavioral approach rather than asking "what if" questions... it's just too easy to espouse theories that sound good.

This means putting together some 'scenario' questions such as "Tell us about a time when you had to implement a major policy change" or "Tell us about a time when you were faced with escalating conflict between two staff members" or "Tell us how you deal with medication errors"

You ask each candidate to respond to exactly the same set of behavioral questions. Do not let them fall back into general statements ("I always try to ....") You want them to tell you the story of how they actually dealt with the issue. This reveals a lot. You can then compare responses between the candidates to see which one best fits the overall 'wish list'.

It's great that you're involved. Make the most of it!

MrChicagoRN, RN

Specializes in Leadership, Psych, HomeCare, Amb. Care. Has 30 years experience.

Definitely go with the behavioral interview.

Also, in formulating your questions, what is important to you and the team? What did the previous manager do that was really good, and what did they do that you don't want to see repeated?

AOx1

Specializes in ER, ICU, Education. Has 15 years experience.

Recommend you utilize behavioral approach rather than asking "what if" questions... it's just too easy to espouse theories that sound good.

This means putting together some 'scenario' questions such as "Tell us about a time when you had to implement a major policy change" or "Tell us about a time when you were faced with escalating conflict between two staff members" or "Tell us how you deal with medication errors"

You ask each candidate to respond to exactly the same set of behavioral questions. Do not let them fall back into general statements ("I always try to ....") You want them to tell you the story of how they actually dealt with the issue. This reveals a lot. You can then compare responses between the candidates to see which one best fits the overall 'wish list'.

It's great that you're involved. Make the most of it!

Great suggestions from HouTx here. I strongly suggest this type of interviewing as well.

I would also want to know about how they would handle any current issues in the unit. For example, let's say that your unit is currently understaffed. I would ask about what they would do in such a case, as HouTx has mentioned. For example: "Tell us about how you would manage a situation in which a shift was not adequately staffed." I would want to know if the manager would be proactive, how he or she would react if this were a recurring issue vs a temporary issue.

I would also ask about a time the manager had to advocate for staff in the past. Was it successful?

I would also want to know about a case in which the manager was unsuccessful. How did he or she handle it? How someone handles frustration and disappointment can tell you plenty, and as a middle manager, there are plenty of opportunities for frustration!

Here are a few more: "Tell me about a time in which a patient complained about a staff member to you. How did you handle the patient's complaint?"

In other words, will the manager correctly assess first, or jump on the staff member without thoroughly gaining an understanding of what happened?

The team really liked these. Especially about not falling back on the general. Thank you! Moe

got it. Thank you!