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Nurse Attorney -- which branch has more opportunities?

Posted

Hello,

For years, I have considered joining the military. I have a law degree and currently work in state government, advocating for abused and neglected children. I am trained in conflict resolution, have a third degree in conflict studies, and I previously worked with sexual assault and domestic violence victims.

I'm applying to a forensic psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner program. For a long time, I have been following the military's handling of sexual assault within its ranks, and I am curious to know if any branch has a need for a forensic nurse attorney.

It seems that I would either have to apply for the JAG Corps or, eventually, the Medical Corps. I would like to find out if there was a resource officer or an investigative role that would utilize someone with that specialized skillset?

Thanks,

BG

Pixie.RN, MSN, RN

Specializes in EMS, ED, Trauma, CNE, CEN, CPEN, TCRN. Has 13 years experience.

The Army does not utilize nurse attorneys as far as I know. Nurses, yes. Attorneys, yes. Combination? No, not in an active duty role.

jfratian, MSN, RN

Specializes in ICU. Has 9 years experience.

If you are willing to take cases that are non-medical, I'm sure nothing will stop you from joining as an attorney. Your expertise would make you extremely competitive. My base in the Air Force has a sexual assault victim advocate lawyer; your expertise would make you ideal for that role.

If you are willing to take cases that are non-medical, I'm sure nothing will stop you from joining as an attorney. Your expertise would make you extremely competitive. My base in the Air Force has a sexual assault victim advocate lawyer; your expertise would make you ideal for that role.

Thanks. Giving a term to what I'm looking for was extremely helpful. I think serving as the Victim's Legal Counsel would be awesome; I am even more interested in the Sexual Assault Resource Coordinator because they focus on the coordination of services for the victim. That, on the surface, would use my legal and nursing knowledge (once I have it).

However, I am not sure if the SARC is a civilian role or not.

Pixie.RN, MSN, RN

Specializes in EMS, ED, Trauma, CNE, CEN, CPEN, TCRN. Has 13 years experience.

SARCs can be military or civilian in the Army. For military, it's usually a collateral duty: SEXUAL HARASSMENT/ASSAULT RESPONSE & PREVENTION

In the course of my duties as a SANE nurse, I have had to testify in military court, and there was a special victims prosecutor who acted as a consultant to the prosecutor team. She was active duty - an O-4 (Major). I am not sure how she ended up in this role, but she was part of JAG. You'd probably be great in that role.

SARCs can be military or civilian in the Army. For military, it's usually a collateral duty: SEXUAL HARASSMENT/ASSAULT RESPONSE & PREVENTION

In the course of my duties as a SANE nurse, I have had to testify in military court, and there was a special victims prosecutor who acted as a consultant to the prosecutor team. She was active duty - an O-4 (Major). I am not sure how she ended up in this role, but she was part of JAG. You'd probably be great in that role.

Thanks.

Collateral duty means that you have a primary assignment doing something else than a secondary role (collateral) as a Victim Advocate?

windsurfer8, BSN

Specializes in Psych/Military Nursing. Has 14 years experience.

It means be prepared to work 6 days a week sometimes 12 hours or more. Not saying you will, but many do. In the military a nurse is a nurse..and also has multiple other responsibilities. So "days off' your phone is ringing and you are coming in for this meeting or that meeting. And when you are in the military there is no "I can't make it in". You say "yes ma'am/yes sir" and you go in.

Pixie.RN, MSN, RN

Specializes in EMS, ED, Trauma, CNE, CEN, CPEN, TCRN. Has 13 years experience.

Thanks.

Collateral duty means that you have a primary assignment doing something else than a secondary role (collateral) as a Victim Advocate?

Yep. It is typical for soldiers to be a unit victim advocate as a collateral duty (additional duty). I am an ER nurse, but being a SANE was a collateral duty.