Jump to content

NP or CRNA

NP   (3,100 Views 12 Comments)
by rnything rnything (Member) Member

1,328 Profile Views; 18 Posts

I just recently got accepted to a Gerontology NP program and I have to make a decision by this week whether i want to attend or not. i'm reluctant to make the decision bc i'm also interested in the crna program and don't know if i should apply for that program instead for 2008. can someone please give me some advice. i know that the decision is ultimately mine but just need some advice. i already have all the requirements and experience to apply for the crna program for next year.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

traumaRUs has 27 years experience as a MSN, APRN, CNS and specializes in Nephrology, Cardiology, ER, ICU.

15 Followers; 165 Articles; 21,009 Posts; 190,275 Profile Views

Hi and welcome. I think maybe looking over your motives might help you:

1. Are you in a position where you can quit work and go to school for a couple of years full-time? (This is what is required for most CRNA schools).

2. Where do you ultimately want to work? (OR or something else).

3. Have you shadowed an NP and CRNA? (Which role suits you the best?

Good luck

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Are you a credible source? Add your Credentials, Experience, etc.

18 Posts; 1,328 Profile Views

thank you tramaRUs~

in reply to your post

1) yes, i can quit work and go back to school full time.

2)I'm open to working in different parts of the hospital including OR

3)I have shadowed both and realize that they have different roles. i can't figure out what i want to specialize in. I can see myself as a gero NP cuz i love working with the older adults. however, i can see myself also as a crna in the OR intubating and sedating pts.

i'm thinking maybe that i'll hold off on the np until later and try and get into a crna program. maybe i'll pursue gnp later on in life.

traumaRUs, r u a crna? or a NP? just curious. but anyways, thank you for your reply. those questions really helped a lot.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

traumaRUs has 27 years experience as a MSN, APRN, CNS and specializes in Nephrology, Cardiology, ER, ICU.

15 Followers; 165 Articles; 21,009 Posts; 190,275 Profile Views

Actually, I'm an adult health CNS (clinical nurse specialist). I'm in an NP-type role though in a nephrology practice. When I personally was considering CRNA versus other APN, I shadowed a CRNA and decided there was absolutely no way that I could sit or stand still long enough. It seemed all the good stuff was on the other side of the curtain - lol. That's what made the decision for me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

MaleAPRN specializes in Nurse Practitioner/CRNA Pain Mgmt.

206 Posts; 3,604 Profile Views

Hi,

I am an APN with dual roles. I am an NP and a CRNA. I was an NP first then several years later decided to become a CRNA. If you decide to become a CRNA first, thinking that you might want to become an NP later on, I personally would think that you will not pursue it unless you are really craving the "patient-provider" interaction (i.e., continuity of care). As a CRNA, I only meet my patient whom I give anesthesia to for only a few hours during their surgery. After that, I won't see him/her anymore...or for a while until they have another surgical procedure.

When I work in the Pain Clinic in my NP role, I get to see the same patients over and over again. The continuity of care is there.

Also, once you earn a living as a CRNA and start your life as an anesthesia provider, you might find it difficult to go back to school to become an NP. CRNA's make considerably more than NPs. Unless you plan to work and split your time between nurse anesthesia and work as an NP (which might be a hard thing to do, unless you do it like I do - working in the Pain Clinic and providing anesthesia for the same organization) and get paid in one lump package for doing both advanced roles, then you will have it made.

Send me a PM if you want more information to how I did it and like doing both advance roles at the same tiime.

Vince

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

subee has 45 years experience as a MSN, CRNA.

1 Follower; 1,756 Posts; 18,139 Profile Views

I just recently got accepted to a Gerontology NP program and I have to make a decision by this week whether i want to attend or not. i'm reluctant to make the decision bc i'm also interested in the crna program and don't know if i should apply for that program instead for 2008. can someone please give me some advice. i know that the decision is ultimately mine but just need some advice. i already have all the requirements and experience to apply for the crna program for next year.

Are you an adrenaline junkie? If you are then you will like the OR. Doesn' mean its the best thing for you but your adrenaline receptors will be filled. Nice when you young but hard to do in your 60's - a career in gerentology will carry you further into your own aging process. Anesthesia can be very hard on your body after years of lifting very heavy objects. In anesthesia you will become a corporate widget but the bennies are usually better. If you like to talk to people, mull while you're problem solving and like moving around in a larger space while you work then gerontology would probably make you happier. The admission rate to CRNA school is about 1 in 9 (it was the same in 1982 when I started!) The OR can be a real grind - its nothing more than a very highly refined assembly line. Even working for the best of employers there will be days where there are no breaks except for the quickest pee. If you can handle a lot of drama in your life, you might like it. But you often have to work really long shifts and the weekends and nights and the holidays; that aspect never bothered me but a lot of people need to know they will be out at a certain time or that they're not wired to work 16 or 24 hour shifts. Whatever you decide, you'll be in great demand and of use to society so either one ain't bad. You can PM me if you wish.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

traumaRUs has 27 years experience as a MSN, APRN, CNS and specializes in Nephrology, Cardiology, ER, ICU.

15 Followers; 165 Articles; 21,009 Posts; 190,275 Profile Views

Subee - you bring up excellent points. I know that I'm an adrenaline junkie which is why I loved the ER and still love pre-hospital care. It forces you to continually be on your toes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

natrgrrl specializes in LTC.

405 Posts; 9,121 Profile Views

rnything, what programs and how many did you apply for? If you think you should wait, then pay attention to why you want to wait.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

traumaRUs has 27 years experience as a MSN, APRN, CNS and specializes in Nephrology, Cardiology, ER, ICU.

15 Followers; 165 Articles; 21,009 Posts; 190,275 Profile Views

I only applied to one program because I was doing a post-MSN certificate so there was no waiting anywhere.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Are you a credible source? Add your Credentials, Experience, etc.

369 Posts; 7,663 Profile Views

personaly I say go for the np program since you are accepted having classes in pathophysiology pharmacology and physical diagnosis can never hurt you. Then if you decide you still want to go for CRNA you can withdraw from the NP program if you are accepted into a CRNA program. Why did you choose GNP, the scope of practice is very limited compared to ANP or FNP. ANCC if even considering a pathway for FNPs and ANPs to become certified as a GNP without having to attend a postmasters program.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Are you a credible source? Add your Credentials, Experience, etc.

18 Posts; 1,328 Profile Views

thank you all for your great advice. after careful consideration, i decided to go back to school next year instead. I will reapply to grad school next year whether it's for crna or np. i'll continue to ask some of you guys for more advice. I was in a rush to go back to school and have only had a 1.5 years of experience in the ICU. although its adequate for most grad school programs, i felt that i needed more experience. but thank you very much, i really appreciate the advice!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
×