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Not getting the job you want as a new grad- wrong to leave?

Nurses   (387 Views 3 Comments)
by jenrae519 jenrae519 (New) New Nurse

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Is it wrong to try (I will further explain) and leave a current position during orientation if the job you really wanted opens up?

ICU is really where I want to be, and what I need for a future job (which requires 3+ years of critical care experience). This unit hires new grads as I share the same new grad classes with them. I started at my organization last month and still have a couple months of orientation left. In my current department we will sometimes float to ICU to work, and after going a few times with my preceptor I realized I would be happier there.

It's not that my current unit is bad, I just feel like it's been incredibly sloppy as far as training goes and have gotten "ripped off" with education more than other new grads that started, and the work load is a lot and overwhelming at times. But I'm afraid to even ask what the rules would be in my organization, let alone try to apply and it fails and word gets out, etc. I overheard one of the nurses say last week (as one was joking about leaving as soon as he got off orientation) "Yeah a lot of people just get trained then leave!" and I wouldn't want to make things weird if they are being floated to a unit that I left for, or even worse I get floated back up there because it happens often! So I am unsure of what to do. Wait a year and maybe things will be different? Or attempt to leave now? 

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Hoosier_RN has 20 years experience as a MSN and specializes in LTC, home health, hospice, ICU, ER, dialysis.

3 Followers; 1,607 Posts; 3,401 Profile Views

You will need to see what your facility's policy is regarding transfers. Some new grad programs don't allow for a specific time frame. 

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7 Followers; 3,266 Posts; 22,042 Profile Views

My experience has been that some places make you work a minimum of six months after orientation prior to transfer although a year is more common. Sometimes 18 months. My advice is for you to stay put, finish your orientation, work for a year, volunteer to float to ICU as much as you can but keep your wish to work there on the down low at first, wow the ICU manager with your attitude/team work/work ethic, wow your current manager with the same attributes, keep your CRNA/flight nurse/NP plans to yourself then put in for a transfer when a job opens up. Asking for a transfer now is premature and likely to come back and bite you in the butt. This year will go faster than you think. 

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