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Non-Nursing related bachelors to NP?

I'll be completeing my bachelors in the next 1.5 years and was originally planning on medical school, however have changed my mind as I'm more interested in the patient aspect. It feels way too late now to get a nursing degree for undergrad. I've heard about programs that allow you to get an MSN degree even if you have no BSN/RN, but just any old bachelors. What I don't get, is an MSN degree what allows you to take an exam to become a certified nurse practitioner? Or are these programs just to become an RN? 

 

Basically -- I want to be a family nurse practitioner, starting with an unrelated bachelors degree. Is this possible and how long would it take?

6 hours ago, Epic Bawler said:

I'll be completeing my bachelors in the next 1.5 years and was originally planning on medical school, however have changed my mind as I'm more interested in the patient aspect.

What do you mean, the patient aspect?

verene, MSN

Specializes in mental health / psychiatic nursing.

If you have 1.5 years left on your bachelor's it is likely MORE cost effective to switch your major to nursing and get a BSN now if you want to go the NP route. (You can also still go to med school with a BSN, if you decide you still want to do this).

While it is possible to go from non-nursing bachelor's to NP this path is NOT for everyone and I would strongly urge you to do  your research before going this direction.

These programs are either an accelerated Bachelors + MSN-NP (and/or DNP-NP) OR are a direct-entry MSN, some of which combine RN + NP education (typically 3 years) some of which are RN-only and which require post-masters certification or DNP for NP training.

However, these programs are often expensive and financial aid may or may not apply for RN portion of program if you have a prior bachelor's degree. They can also be incredibly intense and time consuming (which may not phase you if you are currently thinking med school) and may not allow as much opportunity for working along side school as other paths. NP programs also tend to be much less flexible (when compared to med school) with allowing one to run down your own interest areas - I.e. some med schools allow a "sabbatical" year for research during medical school and/or option for co-degrees (clinical research, public health, etc). 

I would urge you to really take some time to look at the pros/cons of each pathway (Med school, switching to BSN, various direct or accelerated NP routes, etc) and in relationship with your career and life goals.

If possible, try to have some informational interviews and/or shadow opportunities (may be difficult with COVID) with both physicians and NPs to get a better sense of the similarities and the differences between the roles.

You may also want to look at the PA route as well, which is it's own pathway and set of opportunities. Just to give yourself a broad spectrum understanding of what is out there.

 

 

 

londonflo

Specializes in oncology.

On 7/11/2020 at 9:46 AM, verene said:

some med schools allow a "sabbatical" year for research during medical school and/or option for co-degrees (clinical research, public health, etc). 

My son loved that feature and that is why he chose Harvard residency. It really enhanced his view of healthcare in the US and the world. He did several projects with the WHO and some were as basic as incorporating a pulse ox into surgery vitals in undeveloped programs. 

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