New RN in Charge - Advice??

Nurses General Nursing

Published

I'm a new grad in a charge nurse position in a psych hospital ... I have had some issues w/ the company I'm working for, but have decided to stick it out & do the best job I can :uhoh21:

Sooooooooo here's the situation I need advice on: How do I effectivly manage the aides/Mental Health workers

With my personality I just hate being in charge, but this is where I am right now ... it seems like whatever decision I make someone is mad @ me or badmouthing me after/during the shift. There are no other RN's on the floor who i can talk to & find myself very discourage b/c I'm truly doing my best & it bugs me that some people don't like me or respect that I am giving this job my all.

Grant it there are some awesome MHW's on my unit, but for some reason the complainer's r really getting to me.

Any advice for a newbie/pushover by nature, on how to effectivly manage staff & being confident in the decision I make???

Specializes in Critical Care, Education.

Congrats on your rapid career progression. One of the most difficult transitional issues for new managers is effective use of power. It's tough to become comfortable being the "boss" - some people just dont want this burden and it keeps them from accepting management positions. Others new managers over-use power from day one, with equally disatrous results.

I would suggest working on increasing your assertiveness. Enroll in an assertiveness training program if possible. Take advantage of available resources. Enlist the aid of a more experienced mentor who can help you 'rehearse' effective strategies and analyze situations to determine the best approach. Make sure you are very familiar with all your organizational policies - especially those concerning employee discipline. Don't hesitate to ask you HR folks for help in any employee relations issue.

MedSurgeMess

985 Posts

Specializes in Med/Surg, ICU, educator.

Just remember, that no matter where you work, you will always have at least 1 person complaining about the job you do, regardless of how good/bad of a job you do! Start by asking the complainer if they have a better suggestion of how the job should be done, in a non-confrontational way, of course. Listen to suggestions, and as long is no one person is getting the short end of the stick work load wise, you may be able to reach an agreeable workday. But remember, the patients are your 1st priority. You are not working to make friends, but if you can get along with your coworkers, great, if not, just always be fair in a way that you can justify in the face of complaints. This is the reason I've turned down more than 1 charge position. I get tired of whiners

+ Add a Comment

By using the site, you agree with our Policies. X