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New grad struggle

Nurses   (328 Views | 3 Replies)

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Hi all sorry for another typical new grad post. I'm three shifts into a residency program on a busy peds floor and I'm not sure where I'm supposed to be goal wise. Over my three shifts I've had four different preceptors which includes one shift I had to switch mid shift due to the charge nurse not accounting for a patient's family not wanting a male nurse. My first day I pretty much just shadowed and my second day was a week later since my hospital schedules a shift during the classroom part of orientation which makes no sense. On my second shift I got more involved  and had some good learning outcomes. My third shift was a disaster.  My preceptor decided it was a good idea to send me to fiddle with my Ascom during report so I missed about half of the info on two of our patients. She also decided I should take the led on all three patients which had. For reference 2-3 patients is our normal full load. Of course this didn't go well and I felt overwhelmed. She also refused to go over what I missed during report and that made me feel even stupider when I got her questions wrong.  Not sure where I should be at this point of my orientation. Planning to talk to my orientation coordinator this week as I'm confused and scared that I'm not where I should be.  Since I moved for this job also very scared I'm going to get fired.  As, an aside  to how bizarre this program is we don't have a med surg orientation until weeks four and six of the program.  Any thoughts or suggestions would be welcomed!

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2 hours ago, stockmanjr said:

She also decided I should take the led on all three patients which had.

I think you may need to take a more proactive and pleasantly assertive approach in your own best interest.

At the beginning of the shift, see if it's possible to take 5 minutes to discuss goals (for you) for the day. There's nothing wrong with making a suggestion such as "I think I'd like to try taking the lead on one patient and build my way up." [For example].

It's really disappointing to read that such basic things as making a learning plan (a long range one and, separately, goals for the day) is not being done routinely. It's so basic. The alternative is that the entity believes its fine if each day is just a random experience that may or may not work toward the long-term goal. There are numerous things that can work during an orientation but one thing that doesn't seem to work well is this idea of dumping everything on someone right at the beginning--especially when "back-up" means pointing out everything they didn't do or did wrong, and criticizing it.

Get this under control by being proactive. Try to have a meeting with the person in charge of new-staff orientations in order to come up with a plan.

Good luck!

 

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Rose_Queen has 15 years experience as a BSN, MSN, RN and specializes in OR, education.

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31 minutes ago, JKL33 said:

I think you may need to take a more proactive and pleasantly assertive approach in your own best interest.

At the beginning of the shift, see if it's possible to take 5 minutes to discuss goals (for you) for the day.

I agree with this. Where I work, our OR orientees work 8 hours Monday through Friday because that's when the bulk of the surgeries happen. However, this is not what most of the staff work, and therefore orientees have multiple preceptors in a week. I always encourage them to take a few minutes at the beginning of the day to discuss with the preceptor what they are comfortable doing, what they haven't yet experienced, and what their goals are for the day. It helps set the expectations.

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3 minutes ago, Rose_Queen said:

I agree with this. Where I work, our OR orientees work 8 hours Monday through Friday because that's when the bulk of the surgeries happen. However, this is not what most of the staff work, and therefore orientees have multiple preceptors in a week. I always encourage them to take a few minutes at the beginning of the day to discuss with the preceptor what they are comfortable doing, what they haven't yet experienced, and what their goals are for the day. It helps set the expectations.

I'm going to do that next shift. Also, I'll be firmer atleast in the first few weeks about making sure we're on the same page with all the information from report. Thanks everyone!

Edited by stockmanjr

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