Jump to content

New grad as only RN in cardiology office?

First Year   (3,684 Views | 10 Replies)

1,236 Profile Views; 22 Posts

Ok, so, I got a call from a cardiology office. They don't have a RN on staff and called me to express interest in me. This terrifies me because I have 0 experience and there aren't any other RNs to train me. Help!! If offered a position, should I even take it? I'm just not sure if it would be safe, especiag since its been a long time since graduation and this would (possibly) be my first job.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

DatMurse has 3 years experience and specializes in Hematology/Oncology.

792 Posts; 19,230 Profile Views

are there any experienced LPNs that cold help guide you?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

22 Posts; 1,236 Profile Views

I think there's at least 1 LPN. I didn't think about that because I know RNs have a little more certification than LPNs so I assumed an RN would have to train me(?). My understanding of the exact differences between LPN and RN isn't very clear, but I'm pretty sure its not very much. That and the office manager asked me how I would feel acting as a leader to staff, so....there's that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

DatMurse has 3 years experience and specializes in Hematology/Oncology.

792 Posts; 19,230 Profile Views

I think there's at least 1 LPN. I didn't think about that because I know RNs have a little more certification than LPNs so I assumed an RN would have to train me(?). My understanding of the exact differences between LPN and RN isn't very clear, but I'm pretty sure its not very much. That and the office manager asked me how I would feel acting as a leader to staff, so....there's that.

Not necessarily. Depending on the LPN they can be an amazing teacher. RNs teach RNs in school. I had an LPN of 30+ years teach me the proper protocol on administering blood in the hospital.

Do not ever let a license limit you. You may be teaching a new doctor in 20+ years from now on what an experienced doctor would do.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

22 Posts; 1,236 Profile Views

Thats good to hear, thank you! I've met LPNs in clinicals that were absolutely wonderful, one was more helpful than the RN. Licensing is necessary to do certain jobs, but to me experience is way more valuable.

That eases my anxiety a little for sure.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

22 Posts; 1,236 Profile Views

Meant to add this to my last comment: I hope no one misunderstands me, I certainly do not think of LPNs as "beneath me" in any way. I just didn't know how much it would matter, as far as licensing goes on paper, with training another nurse. The most valuable knowledge comes with experience after all!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pixie.RN has 12 years experience as a MSN, RN, EMT-P and specializes in EMS, ED, Trauma, CNE, CEN, CPEN, TCRN.

8 Followers; 32 Articles; 13,363 Posts; 130,679 Profile Views

This job sounds less clinical and more administrative - so, think very stable patients. :) You might have to do EKGs on patients if they come in with chest pain or need a stress test, but I am sure the LPN can show you the ins and outs of the clinical aspects of the position. I work with LPNs in my ER, and they are fabulous. They just can't do IVP meds, we usually do that for them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

56 Posts; 2,107 Profile Views

It sounds like a great opportunity, especially if cardiology is an interest of yours. I can understand your nervousness and hesitation in having an LPN possibly be your teacher. As a new grad, we have heard our teachers say that teaching is the role of an RN. At least, that's what my teachers said much of the time. Maybe in the real world, though, experienced LPNs are called on to help train staff with any and all licenses. In any event, good luck and enjoy the position if you decide to accept it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

HouTx has 35 years experience as a BSN, MSN, EdD and specializes in Critical Care, Education.

9,051 Posts; 45,661 Profile Views

Hang on there a minute.

There is no possible circumstance in which a brand new RN grad can effectively serve as a 'lead' (supervisor), no matter how experienced the LPNs may be. While LPNs may be highly expert, their scope of practice is limited. The RN scope of practice dictates that s/he would be responsible for managing "nursing care" of subordinate staff. In a physician office, there is some wiggle room, because the physician can also act as a supervisor of the LPNs work... but it doesn't negate the RN's accountability. Physicians are clueless about nursing scope of practice - heck, it is sometimes confusing for us!

I urge OP to investigate the state's Nurse Practice Act & BON to seek clarification. In Tx, there are explicit directives that prohibit new grads from assuming any supervisory role until they have achieved independent competency.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

47 Posts; 2,773 Profile Views

I float back and forth between a family practice clinic and an urgent care clinic (they are right across the street from each other and owned by the same company). In the clinic I do more of a teaching role and work very closely with the MAs. The MAs have taught me a lot and I am very appreciative of them. I usually get called over to the urgent care clinic to start IVs and do IV meds, along with other things such as foley catheters. I have only been a nurse since May 2014. Usually I am the only nurse for both clinics. What this means for me is that if I have a question I always make sure to ask the providers or doctors since I don't have another nurse to ask. Or I use resources such as my drug book or my phone. Yes I wish that I had another nurse to work with, but I don't feel that I don't have coworkers who are able to give me feedback. I am doing more IVs and other skills (cathers, blood draws, lots of other labs, procedures) than some of my classmates who are working on hospital floors. I feel like it's a good learning experience, but it also depends on what your goal is.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

22 Posts; 1,236 Profile Views

Thanks everyone! Ann that sounds awesome! Actually the cardiology office never called me so I'm sure they found someone else to fill the position. No big!

I'm glad you commented Ann. E because I may have another amazing clinic opportunity that sounds much better suited for me. They have an amazing reputation, have several branches, and they even told me they enjoy training new grads and that their doctors love to teach! How great is that?! Of course I welcome any nursing opportunity, but I have to admit that I've never really felt compelled to work in a hospital. It's just not my thing, at least as far as I can tell. I honestly just said "yes, I'm looking to work in a x/y/z floor" because I thought that's where new grads were supposed to go for first jobs. I've learned that I have to follow my own path in my nursing career and listen to my gut.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
×

This site uses cookies. By using this site, you consent to the placement of these cookies. Read our Privacy, Cookies, and Terms of Service Policies to learn more.