Need Japanese language skills?

U.S.A. Hawaii

Published

Since it's so hard to get your foot in the door, I'm wondering if having a comfort level with spoken Japanese would give me a better chance. After all, tourists get sick and need care just like anyone else. What kind of certification or proof of skills would I need? Would a good score on the SAT II subject test, Japanese with Listening, be good enough? Or is there any specific credential that would open some doors? Thanks in advance... Oh, BTW I'm hoping to be working in Kona.

Slobgob

184 Posts

I would think Japanese is needed more in town near Waikiki... but who knows...

No cert needed... just say you're fluent... they should believe you. =)

BigIsleBound

65 Posts

Thanks, slobgob... I remember when I was job searching in town, every classified ad wanted Japanese speakers! It was ridiculous... I speak Spanish but that didn't amount to a hill of beans. I do want to learn Japanese anyway, but I won't make it as high of a priority if it won't give me a competitive edge.

Specializes in Critical Care.

No nursing position I ever applied for here in Hawaii required that I speak Japanese. With the exception of the clinic at the Hilton Hawaiian Village or the Straub Doctors on Call service I doubt that it would be much of an advantage.

Hospitals here have a list of interpreters that can be called upon should the need arise for an interpreter.

Where I see the requirement for fluency in Japanese is in the upscale retail market and hotel concierge jobs which, at this point, might be a better job market than nursing in Hawaii.

BigIsleBound

65 Posts

Thanks WindwardOahuRN... when I was job searching in Honolulu it was as a college student at HPU... the thought of nursing hadn't even crossed my mind as an option at that time. Perhaps working as a concierge is a viable option for some but not for me... kissing up to rich folks isn't my cup of tea.

Lisa From Maui

143 Posts

dear big isle bound:

to answer your question: put on your application "fluent in japanese." even if you have the language skills and vocabulary of a 5 year old child, you're still fluent. if you can understand, i want to go to the bathroom. i want to call my family. i'm hungry. i'm in pain. then you're fluent. if the patient needs a better explanation, then you call an interpreter. that's what they are hired for.

on a side note... keep in mind... if you're not getting a job, it has less to do with the language that you speak and more to do with the economy. put another way... the thing that would make you (and all the other nurses) more marketable would be for the economy to turn around. best of luck!

I think it would be more helpful if you could speak Ilocano.

That way you'd be able to understand what your co-workers are saying...about you!

:rolleyes:

BigIsleBound

65 Posts

I think it would be more helpful if you could speak Ilocano.

That way you'd be able to understand what your co-workers are saying...about you!

:rolleyes:

I'm not familiar with this language... is it from the Philippines?

Slobgob

184 Posts

Yep, Philippines.

Tagalog = city

Ilocano = country-side

Atleast, that's my easy generalization. =)

petunia2016

108 Posts

Since it's so hard to get your foot in the door, I'm wondering if having a comfort level with spoken Japanese would give me a better chance. After all, tourists get sick and need care just like anyone else. What kind of certification or proof of skills would I need? Would a good score on the SAT II subject test, Japanese with Listening, be good enough? Or is there any specific credential that would open some doors? Thanks in advance... Oh, BTW I'm hoping to be working in Kona.

You want to work in Kona? Why???

BigIsleBound

65 Posts

You want to work in Kona? Why???

lol why wouldn't I? The Big Island is more affordable than many other islands, and I hope to buy some farmland up by the Parker Ranch area... I figure commuting to Kona wouldn't be too brutal from there.

petunia2016

108 Posts

lol why wouldn't I? The Big Island is more affordable than many other islands, and I hope to buy some farmland up by the Parker Ranch area... I figure commuting to Kona wouldn't be too brutal from there.

I'm from Kona. Kona is actually pretty expensive as well, Hilo is cheaper. And Kona Hospital? That's the worst hospital on the whole island. My friend commutes to Waimea just to work there. But good luck, either way! :D

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