Need Advice(Study time)

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I need advice how to maintain good grade I only have 5 left to finish my Prerequisites class before admission into the nursing class and I will be taking Human Anatomy and Physiology I online in the fall and I need advice how to maintain good grade and how to study them because I believe it will be a challenge course for me any tips, advice will be great!

My goal to pass all my classes with A and B and I pretty much concern with Human Anatomy & Physiology I &II and Microbiology

I just want to keep a great GPA so that I can enroll in the BSN once I grauduate with my Associate Degree in Nursing (RN)

shukry

41 Posts

I need advice how to maintain good grade I only have 5 left to finish my Prerequisites class before admission into the nursing class and I will be taking Human Anatomy and Physiology I online in the fall and I need advice how to maintain good grade and how to study them because I believe it will be a challenge course for me any tips, advice will be great!

My goal to pass all my classes with A and B and I pretty much concern with Human Anatomy & Physiology I &II and Microbiology

I just want to keep a great GPA so that I can enroll in the BSN once I grauduate with my Associate Degree in Nursing (RN)

I got an A and a B in A&P and I was pregnant. I think studying a head of the class, and immediately after is the key to my success. Find online virtual Labs to help with the lab. I found out a lot of sites after I finished. Check this one out http://mandevillehigh.stpsb.org/2005site/teacher_sites/laura_decker/biology2.html

Daytonite, BSN, RN

4 Articles; 14,603 Posts

Specializes in med/surg, telemetry, IV therapy, mgmt. Has 40 years experience.

I would use flashcards to memorize and learn the definitions of the cells and all the cell inclusions. You should also be able to name the parts of a cell if you are given a picture. For practice, xerox the one from your textbook, white out the labels and xerox a couple to quiz yourself with. By the way. . .how are you able to take this course on line without a hands on lab?

Next, is bones. Use flashcards again to memorize and learn the definitions of the names of all the little bumps and groves that anatomists have given to bones in general. As for the actual names of bones, I would list them under headings like arm, leg, head, back, hands and feet. Know the total number of bones in the body. This is a simple question, but you wouldn't believe how many people get the answer wrong! We had bone boxes at my school that we could sign out over the weekend to study with (to learn all the tuberosities, etc). Don't wait until a week before the test to get them if your school does this because most people wait until the last minute.

Next, is muscles. Again, flashcards for the terminology associated, in general, with muscle. I thought muscles were the hardest because I had trouble understanding the difference between the origin and the insertion of each muscle. If you get that cleared up, you're good to go. You will have to memorize names of muscles and what part of the body they move.

Circulation is probably next. The circulation of blood through the heart you need to learn. The St. Joseph commercial on TV with that catchy song really sums it up good! It helps me to kind of close my eyes and take an imaginary trip through the heart.

I don't remember what comes after those systems or in what order. Those are the four biggest to learn though.

Did I scare you too much? To me, anatomy is kind of cut and dry (memorizing). Physiology is a tad different because it involves how the different systems work. Don't wait until the last minute to study stuff for a test. Start working on learning it from Day 1. It helps if you can find one or two people to study with. By quizzing each other and trying to anticipate the questions you will be asked on a test you will be way ahead of the other students and headed for higher test scores.

I have a great idea for making flashcards and study questions using Microsoft Word. Set up a Table in a Word document with two columns and you will keep adding rows as you work on this. A term or question goes on the left sided cell. The definition or answer goes on the right sided cell. When you want to quiz yourself, position the pointer at the top of the right column with your mouse, click the mouse to select the entire column, then change the font color to white. The answers then become "invisible". To reveal the answers while you are quizzing yourself, click on the cell to select all the "invisible" text and then change the font color for that cell only back to black. This saves printing out a lot of paper. You can also e-mail these documents to other buddies. Just the activity of making these flashcards is a form of studying. For definitions or questions that you have trouble with select the entire row, copy it, and paste it onto another document that you print will out so you can carry those cards with you for little quicky learning lessons. Once printed out the line down the middle will be your folding line. I used to print the cards, fold the paper in half, use rubber cement to glue the paper together and when it dried, cut them into cards using the table lines as cutting guides. I had a part time job teaching medical terminology at a vocational school a few years ago and this is how I had my students learn their medical terminology ('cause it's all memorization).

Good luck!

BESTRONG

18 Posts

I would use flashcards to memorize and learn the definitions of the cells and all the cell inclusions. You should also be able to name the parts of a cell if you are given a picture. For practice, xerox the one from your textbook, white out the labels and xerox a couple to quiz yourself with. By the way. . .how are you able to take this course on line without a hands on lab?

Next, is bones. Use flashcards again to memorize and learn the definitions of the names of all the little bumps and groves that anatomists have given to bones in general. As for the actual names of bones, I would list them under headings like arm, leg, head, back, hands and feet. Know the total number of bones in the body. This is a simple question, but you wouldn't believe how many people get the answer wrong! We had bone boxes at my school that we could sign out over the weekend to study with (to learn all the tuberosities, etc). Don't wait until a week before the test to get them if your school does this because most people wait until the last minute.

Next, is muscles. Again, flashcards for the terminology associated, in general, with muscle. I thought muscles were the hardest because I had trouble understanding the difference between the origin and the insertion of each muscle. If you get that cleared up, you're good to go. You will have to memorize names of muscles and what part of the body they move.

Circulation is probably next. The circulation of blood through the heart you need to learn. The St. Joseph commercial on TV with that catchy song really sums it up good! It helps me to kind of close my eyes and take an imaginary trip through the heart.

I don't remember what comes after those systems or in what order. Those are the four biggest to learn though.

Did I scare you too much? To me, anatomy is kind of cut and dry (memorizing). Physiology is a tad different because it involves how the different systems work. Don't wait until the last minute to study stuff for a test. Start working on learning it from Day 1. It helps if you can find one or two people to study with. By quizzing each other and trying to anticipate the questions you will be asked on a test you will be way ahead of the other students and headed for higher test scores.

I have a great idea for making flashcards and study questions using Microsoft Word. Set up a Table in a Word document with two columns and you will keep adding rows as you work on this. A term or question goes on the left sided cell. The definition or answer goes on the right sided cell. When you want to quiz yourself, position the pointer at the top of the right column with your mouse, click the mouse to select the entire column, then change the font color to white. The answers then become "invisible". To reveal the answers while you are quizzing yourself, click on the cell to select all the "invisible" text and then change the font color for that cell only back to black. This saves printing out a lot of paper. You can also e-mail these documents to other buddies. Just the activity of making these flashcards is a form of studying. For definitions or questions that you have trouble with select the entire row, copy it, and paste it onto another document that you print will out so you can carry those cards with you for little quicky learning lessons. Once printed out the line down the middle will be your folding line. I used to print the cards, fold the paper in half, use rubber cement to glue the paper together and when it dried, cut them into cards using the table lines as cutting guides. I had a part time job teaching medical terminology at a vocational school a few years ago and this is how I had my students learn their medical terminology ('cause it's all memorization).

Good luck!

Thank you so much Daytonite for the great tips and information how to study. YOu ask me how am I able to take this course online with a hands on lab? There is a lab require for this course I am not sure how that work I havent went to the orentiona yet the class start on Aug 29 2005 so I will find out about the lab and how it work before we start our class. I will keep youposted on that

Thank you so much

bestrong(Nicole)

God bless

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