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My experience with CNA class and exams.

CNA/MA   (5,640 Views | 7 Replies)
by ceebeeaitch ceebeeaitch (New) New

852 Profile Views; 4 Posts

Hi, everyone, I wanted to share my experience with the whole process of becoming a CNA since I didn't really know what I was in for when I started and I had some trouble finding out everything I wanted to know.

So, I did my classes here in Austin, Texas at Central Texas Nurse Network. I'd like to start by saying that if you live in Austin, don't take classes there!!! I can't stress that enough. The information about the class online is all wrong, staff gave conflicting information, some of my payments weren't recorded, and at the end of the class the Spanish speaking students were given exams in English even though they requested oral Spanish exams. I could go on for hours about how horrible this class was.

As for the exam itself, my skills were hand washing, communication, range of motion (upper extremity), shaving with disposable razor, and ambulations. Some of the things my classmates got were oral care, dependant oral care, moving to the head of the bed, unoccupied bed, occupied bed, weight, TPR axillary, blood pressure, and moving on the side of the bed towards you.

Range of motion was easy. The resident I worked with had very good motion in her arms and was able to help with the movements.

I actually had the most difficulty with the shaving. The resident I worked with for this skill only spoke Spanish, which I don't speak. It was a real challenge and test of my communication skills. The shaving itself went fine but when I was done I realized I hadn't brought a linen bag in with me. I had to leave to get the bag and forgot to knock before reentering the room. I was pretty flustered at that point and wound up taking all my supplies out with my gloves still on. I was mortified and ran back into the room and placed them in trash, but I was certain at that point that I was going to fail.

When I got to ambulations the resident wasn't pleased with the gait belt saying she didn't need it and didn't want it tight, but I was able to coax her into wearing it. She was very mobile and was fine walking, she mostly just needed help to stand.

When I was finished the woman doing the exam informed me that I had passed everything, she pointed out that I should never leave the room with my gloves on. I was so happy and shocked that I passed even with that glaring mistake.

I was super nervous about written portion, mostly because I felt least informed about it. In the end I felt that it was mostly common sense information. A lot of the questions I got were focused on moral/religious dilemmas of one sort or another. There were also a few medical terminology questions. There were some questions I blanked on but I ended up missing only two questions out of 70.

My suggestion to any one worried about the exam is just to study the provided materials and use your common sense. Whatever you do, always remember that the safety of the resident is the most important things. If you do all that you'll be fine.

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20 Posts; 1,541 Profile Views

I would like to thank you for posting this! I am going to start my CNA class this summer and this helped give me knowledge about what to expect! Good luck and thanks again!

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99 Posts; 4,978 Profile Views

Thanks for sharing, I started my CNA class yesterday and am already stressing over the skills portion.

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2 Posts; 844 Profile Views

My first week finished in a condensed 3 wk CNA class (I am now wishing I had taken the regular 6 wk class, lol). I too, am VERY stressed about the skills portion of the class. It is definitely not my strong suit to recite a task back to an instructor without getting flustered:eek:! If anybody has any advise and what to expect for testing, it would be GRATEFULLY appreciated:) Good luck to all!!!

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tomc5555 has 2 years experience.

250 Posts; 4,612 Profile Views

[h=3][color=#3366ff]these six principles of care helped me remember the opening and closing tasks.

[color=#3366ff]

six principles of care:[/h]

  • dignity: treat each person with respect at all times.

  • independence: encourage each person to do as much as possible.

  • safety: keep a person free from harm by preventing injuries
  • communication: be available to talk, listen, and respond to a person's thoughts and feelings. tell the person about the care you plan to provide. report information about the person to your supervising nurse.
  • infection control: help control the spread of germs.
  • privacy: keep a person's private business private, and do not allow private things to be seen or overheard by other people.

as far as the skills test goes, practice the skills you feel unsure about. are there classmates you can work with? if not watch the youtube videos and practice on a friend or family member. you must practice, practice, practice.

it helped me to pretend the skills test was the clinical site and i was working with a resident. i talked to them as i would a resident and explained what i was doing. that was less artificial than reciting to the instructor.

good luck.

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214 Posts; 4,903 Profile Views

Is anyone taking the CNA skills in North Texas? I am coming from Washington and transferring my school to Texas so I will only have to take the CEP exam. The problem I am encountering is that the skills are very different here in Washington than in Texas as far as being tested on them. What should I do? Does anyone tutor prior to skills for free without having to pay money again for an entire training program?

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8 Posts; 760 Profile Views

This school is not for the lazy or faint of heart. You have to care and want to learn. The professors are full of knowledge and willing to share it with you as long as you don't act like a spoiled brat, showing up late, skipping class, and texting. When you show you want to actually learn and that you actually care, you will have a wonderful learning experience with years of knowledge to back it up. I passed both my skills and my written on the first try because of what I learned at this school. The knowledge is priceless. I have now landed a career at a large well known hospital, all because of what I learned at Central Texas Nurse Network.

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118 Posts; 3,428 Profile Views

This school is not for the lazy or faint of heart. You have to care and want to learn. The professors are full of knowledge and willing to share it with you as long as you don't act like a spoiled brat, showing up late, skipping class, and texting. When you show you want to actually learn and that you actually care, you will have a wonderful learning experience with years of knowledge to back it up. I passed both my skills and my written on the first try because of what I learned at this school. The knowledge is priceless. I have now landed a career at a large well known hospital, all because of what I learned at Central Texas Nurse Network.

I agree with you. I had the same experience training at the American Red Cross and I got a job at a major hospital because of it.

For everyone just starting school, etc: Get together with your classmates if you can outside of school and practice with each other. Know your own learning style and cater to it. You can go online and take a quiz to figure it out.

Here is a great one: LEARNING STYLES TEST PAGE You write your answers down on paper. Whichever letter you answer the most of for V, R, A, or K; you click on the corresponding green and black hand at the bottom of the page to go to a different page. On there, it will tell you your preferred learning style, what you should do in class, how you should study, etc to get the most benefit out of your education. I personally am a reading/writing learner.

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