MSN or DNP for NP degree - what's better??

Posted

I've been trying to decide between getting a MSN/FNP vs a DNP/FNP. I currently have a BSN and have heard differing opinions about whether or not to get a DNP. I have had 3 professors tell me that if I'm going to become an FNP to definitely get DNP; and 2 NP's tell me don't bother getting it. What do you all think?? Is it worth doing a BSN-DNP program or just get a MSN??

Also - I've been struggling to decide whether to get an FNP or PNP. I love working with pediatrics, but am afraid to limit myself when I graduate. I know with an FNP you can work with kids, but how likely is it for a peds clinic or peds doctor's office to hire you with a FNP vs having a PNP? Someday I might want to work in an urgent care, which for that they'd want an FNP I'm assuming? Any thoughts or insight on whether to do the FNP or PNP route? I hurt my back working with adults so peds inpatient is all I can do with my RN; that's why I've chosen to go back to school to get an NP degree - I think it will offer more options for my future; hence why I'm afraid to get a PNP - I'm afraid that will limit my options.

Any advice would be much appreciated!! Thank you in advance!

sallyrnrrt, ADN, RN

Specializes in critical care, ER,ICU, CVSURG, CCU. 2,395 Posts

Both fnp and dnp are providers making similar salary....

Edited by sallyrnrrt
Sp

cleback

cleback

1,381 Posts

Professors telling you that you need more schooling... yes, they are partial to that.

The additional classes for the DNP are management/program development/evaluation courses. If you aren't interested in leadership positions, you are probably good with MSN. There has been talk of making the DNP the entry degree for nurs practitioners but it's far from official. (It's a similar discussion as the ADN/BSN debate.) You can always go back for your doctorate as a master's prepared NP if you so choose.

Personally, I would pursue the FNP for thr flexibility but that's entirely a personal choice. Good luck to you.

localgirl85

localgirl85

43 Posts

Thank you for your thoughtful and helpful reply!! My friend said the same thing about what our old professors told me...And in regards to the DNP - I don't really care for a leadership role necessarily. I more want to work in a doctor's office or clinic...

Do you have any opinion on whether a FNP can work in a peds doctor's office/clinic and whether a PNP (pediatric NP) can work in an urgent care...I love working with peds, but I don't want to limit myself and limit my job outlooks for the future. Any advice on that?? Thanks so much!

localgirl85

localgirl85

43 Posts

hmm good to know they make the same salary--I have been told one of the benefits is a DNP would make more money, as well as being more competitive in the job market...but maybe that isn't true; and maybe like"cleback" wrote the DNP is more for development/leadership roles...

audreysmagic, RN

Specializes in Psych, Peds, Education, Infection Control. Has 15 years experience. 458 Posts

Can't speak to the MSN vs DNP specifically, but I did work at a pediatric office that hired both FNP and PNP. I would think FNP would offer the most flexibility, since you did mention wanting to do urgent care specifically - and FNPs comfortable with smaller kids are quite sought after at a lot of urgent care facilities.

lhflanurseNP

lhflanurseNP, APRN

Specializes in Adult Nurse Practitioner. Has 40 years experience. 737 Posts

A DNP, just like a MSN, is a DEGREE, not a LICENSE. There is no REQUIREMENT for a nurse practitioner to have a DNP over a MSN. Pay is the same because you are paid by your license. You can choose to be a family, adult/gero, pediatric, psych, women's health, etc nurse practitioner. Of course schools and educators are going to push a DNP...lot's more money to the school! Most of the nurses I know that are doing DNP programs complain about the amount of research and that they are really not learning anything more in nursing.

localgirl85

localgirl85

43 Posts

Thank you audreysmagic for your response! It's good to know a peds office would hire either because that's the type of place I want to work but I don't want to limit myself and just have the PNP. Yes I'm hoping the FNP offers more flexibility after graduating. And good to remember urgent cares would appreciate a FNP that is comfortable with kids - you're right! Thank you.

localgirl85

localgirl85

43 Posts

Thank you lhflanurseNP! You're right, a degree is a degree--I never thought about it that way really. I've just heard so much about the push for the DNP degree to practice, but it's not required yet so I'd be "grandfathered in" supposedly!! And yes - why pay for more school to not get paid more?! And to just do more research. No thanks! Thanks for your response.

jessika12gold

jessika12gold

Specializes in pediatrics/ geriatrics. 34 Posts

If this is the case, how come going from MSN-DNP is the same amount of time as going from BSN-MSN? It's frustrating because I so badly want to pursue MSN for anesthesia. I'm worried that I'll complete four yrs of school for my MSN and then be told I have to go back for DNP.